4

Suppose I have a matrix A and I want to apply a function f to each of its elements. I can then use f(A), if f is vectorized or arrayfun(f,A) if it's not.

But what if I had a function that depends on the entry and its indices: f = @(i,j,x) something. How do I apply this function to the matrix A without using a for loop like the following?

for j=1:size(A,2)
   for i=1:size(A,1)
      fA(i,j) = f(i,j,A(i,j));
   end
end

I'd like to consider the function f to be vectorized. Hints on shorter notation for non-vectorized functions are welcome, though.

  • Why do you need a for loop? j and i only ever have 1 value? – IKavanagh Nov 2 '15 at 9:58
  • 1
    Is there a specific function f you are working with or are you looking for a generic case? – Divakar Nov 2 '15 at 9:58
  • @IKavanagh: My mistake, I missed the 1: in the for loops. @Divakar: I'm interested in the generic case. – Wauzl Nov 2 '15 at 9:59
  • 5
    Not sure if this would work for a generic case, but I guess you could try : [I,J] = ndgrid(1:size(A,1),1:size(A,2)); out = f(I,J,A);. – Divakar Nov 2 '15 at 10:03
  • Are the indices always going to be as in your question? – IKavanagh Nov 2 '15 at 10:09
4

I have read your answers and I came up with another idea using indexing, which is the fastest way. Here is my test script:

%// Test function
f = @(i,j,x) i.*x + j.*x.^2;

%// Initialize times
tfor = 0;
tnd = 0;
tsub = 0;
tmy = 0;

%// Do the calculation 100 times
for it = 1:100

   %// Random input data
   A = rand(100);

   %// Clear all variables
   clear fA1 fA2 fA3 fA4;

   %// Use the for loop
   tic;
   fA1(size(A,1),size(A,2)) = 0;
   for j=1:size(A,2)
      for i=1:size(A,1)
         fA1(i,j) = f(i,j,A(i,j));
      end
   end
   tfor = tfor + toc;

   %// Use ndgrid, like @Divakar suggested
   clear I J;
   tic;
   [I,J] = ndgrid(1:size(A,1),1:size(A,2));
   fA2 = f(I,J,A);
   tnd = tnd + toc;

   %// Test if the calculation is correct
   if max(max(abs(fA2-fA1))) > 0
      max(max(abs(fA2-fA1)))
   end

   %// Use ind2sub, like @DennisKlopfer suggested
   clear I J;
   tic;
   [I,J] = ind2sub(size(A),1:numel(A));
   fA3 = arrayfun(f,reshape(I,size(A)),reshape(J,size(A)),A);
   tsub = tsub + toc;

   %// Test if the calculation is correct
   if max(max(abs(fA3-fA1))) > 0
      max(max(abs(fA3-fA1)))
   end

   %// My suggestion using indexing
   clear sA1 sA2 ssA1 ssA2;
   tic;
   sA1=size(A,1);
   ssA1=1:sA1;
   sA2=size(A,2);
   ssA2=1:sA2;
   fA4 = f(ssA1(ones(1,sA2),:)', ssA2(ones(1,sA1,1),:), A); %'
   tmy = tmy + toc;

   %// Test if the calculation is correct
   if max(max(abs(fA4-fA1))) > 0
      max(max(abs(fA4-fA1)))
   end   
end

%// Print times
tfor
tnd
tsub
tmy

I get the result

tfor =
    0.6813

tnd =
    0.0341

tsub =
   10.7477

tmy =
    0.0171
  • 1
    Nice comparison. But your test is not applied to your own solution as you compare fA3-fA1 instead of fA4-fA1. The result actually differs. You need to switch your arguments. Then it is fine. – Dennis Klopfer Nov 2 '15 at 12:16
  • Thanks a lot! I noticed that I made an error (transpose was on the wrong argument), because the test told me the result wasn't correct. – Wauzl Nov 2 '15 at 12:20
2

Assuming that the function is vectorized ( no dependency or recursions involved), as mentioned in the comments earlier, you could use ndgrid to create 2D meshes corresponding to the two nested loop iterators i and j and of the same size as A. When these are fed to the particular function f, it would operate on the input 2D arrays in a vectorized manner. Thus, the implementation would look something like this -

[I,J] = ndgrid(1:size(A,1),1:size(A,2)); 
out = f(I,J,A);

Sample run -

>> f = @(i,j,k) i.^2+j.^2+sin(k);
A = rand(4,5);

for j=1:size(A,2)
   for i=1:size(A,1)
      fA(i,j) = f(i,j,A(i,j));
   end
end
>> fA
fA =
       2.3445       5.7939       10.371       17.506       26.539
       5.7385        8.282       13.538       20.703       29.452
       10.552       13.687       18.076       25.804       34.012
       17.522       20.684       25.054        32.13       41.331
>> [I,J] = ndgrid(1:size(A,1),1:size(A,2)); out = f(I,J,A);
>> out
out =
       2.3445       5.7939       10.371       17.506       26.539
       5.7385        8.282       13.538       20.703       29.452
       10.552       13.687       18.076       25.804       34.012
       17.522       20.684       25.054        32.13       41.331
0

Using arrayfun(), ind2sub() and reshape() you can create the indexes matching the form of A. This way arrayfun() is applicable. There might be a better version as this feels a little bit like a hack, it should work on vectorized and unvectorized functions though.

[I,J] = ind2sub(size(A),1:numel(A));
fA = arrayfun(f,reshape(I,size(A)),reshape(J,size(A)),A)
  • This works as intended, but is still a lot slower than using the for loops. – Wauzl Nov 2 '15 at 11:36

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