63

Background:

Currently we're using Docker and Docker Compose for our services. We have externalized the configuration for different environments into files that define environment variables read by the application. For example a prod.env file:

ENV_VAR_ONE=Something Prod
ENV_VAR_TWO=Something else Prod

and a test.env file:

ENV_VAR_ONE=Something Test
ENV_VAR_TWO=Something else Test

Thus we can simply use the prod.env or test.env file when starting the container:

docker run --env-file prod.env <image>

Our application then picks up its configuration based on the environment variables defined in prod.env.

Questions:

  1. Is there a way to provide environment variables from a file in Kubernetes (for example when defining a pod) instead of hardcoding them like this:
apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata: 
  labels: 
    context: docker-k8s-lab
    name: mysql-pod
  name: mysql-pod
spec: 
  containers: 
    - 
      env: 
        - 
          name: MYSQL_USER
          value: mysql
        - 
          name: MYSQL_PASSWORD
          value: mysql
        - 
          name: MYSQL_DATABASE
          value: sample
        - 
          name: MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD
          value: supersecret
      image: "mysql:latest"
      name: mysql
      ports: 
        - 
          containerPort: 3306
  1. If this is not possible, what is the suggested approach?
87

You can populate a container's environment variables through the use of Secrets or ConfigMaps. Use Secrets when the data you are working with is sensitive (e.g. passwords), and ConfigMaps when it is not.

In your Pod definition specify that the container should pull values from a Secret:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata: 
  labels: 
    context: docker-k8s-lab
    name: mysql-pod
  name: mysql-pod
spec: 
  containers:
  - image: "mysql:latest"
    name: mysql
    ports: 
    - containerPort: 3306
    envFrom:
      - secretRef:
         name: mysql-secret

Note that this syntax is only available in Kubernetes 1.6 or later. On an earlier version of Kubernetes you will have to specify each value manually, e.g.:

env: 
- name: MYSQL_USER
  valueFrom:
    secretKeyRef:
      name: mysql-secret
      key: MYSQL_USER

(Note that env take an array as value)

And repeating for every value.

Whichever approach you use, you can now define two different Secrets, one for production and one for dev.

dev-secret.yaml:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mysql-secret
type: Opaque
data:
  MYSQL_USER: bXlzcWwK
  MYSQL_PASSWORD: bXlzcWwK
  MYSQL_DATABASE: c2FtcGxlCg==
  MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: c3VwZXJzZWNyZXQK

prod-secret.yaml:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: mysql-secret
type: Opaque
data:
  MYSQL_USER: am9obgo=
  MYSQL_PASSWORD: c2VjdXJlCg==
  MYSQL_DATABASE: cHJvZC1kYgo=
  MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: cm9vdHkK

And deploy the correct secret to the correct Kubernetes cluster:

kubectl config use-context dev
kubectl create -f dev-secret.yaml

kubectl config use-context prod
kubectl create -f prod-secret.yaml

Now whenever a Pod starts it will populate its environment variables from the values specified in the Secret.

  • 3
    This is my current approach, however I have 3 different pods using the same list of secrets exposed as EnvVars. Is it possible to define them once and expose them to the 3 pods? – jävi May 25 '16 at 14:06
  • 1
    Not that I know of. – Pixel Elephant May 25 '16 at 20:07
  • 2
    that would be so great... seems like allot of boilerplate to get the env vars into containers. @PixelElephant – AndrewMcLagan Sep 21 '16 at 7:24
  • @jävi Do you mean replication controllers? Regardless, there's nothing binding a secret/config map to a single pod/RC/Deployment. It's just defined in the manifest as above, and can be mounted to as many things as you would like. – aronchick Jan 9 '17 at 21:58
  • @aronchick I believe they are looking for this feature: github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/issues/26299 which looks like it will be landing soon. I'll update the answer once the feature is in a released version of Kubernetes. – Pixel Elephant Jan 9 '17 at 22:02
21

A new update for Kubernetes(v1.6) allows what you asked for(years ago).

You can now use the envFrom like this in your yaml file:

  containers:
  - name: django
    image: image/name
    envFrom:
      - secretRef:
         name: prod-secrets

Where development-secrets is your secret, you can create it by:

kubectl create secret generic prod-secrets --from-file=prod/env.txt`

Where the txt file content is a key-value:

DB_USER=username_here
DB_PASSWORD=password_here

The docs are still lakes of examples, I had to search really hard on those places:

  • Can you share Kubernetes documentation on this? – Artem Dolobanko May 10 '17 at 19:55
  • @ArtemDolobanko Edited, keep in mind this is still new and lakes of docs, you can find many discussions on Github's issues tracker if you want more details. – Or Duan May 10 '17 at 22:03
10

When defining a pod for Kubernetes using a YAML file, there's no direct way to specify a different file containing environment variables for a container. The Kubernetes project says they will improve this area in the future (see Kubernetes docs).

In the meantime, I suggest using a provisioning tool and making the pod YAML a template. For example, using Ansible your pod YAML file would look like:

file my-pod.yaml.template:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
...
spec:
  containers:
  ...
    env:
    - name: MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD
      value: {{ mysql_root_pasword }}
    ...

Then your Ansible playbook can specify the variable mysql_root_password somewhere convenient, and substitute it when creating the resource, for example:

file my-playbook.yaml:

- hosts: my_hosts
  vars_files: 
  - my-env-vars-{{ deploy_to }}.yaml
  tasks:
  - name: create pod YAML from template
    template: src=my-pod.yaml.template dst=my-pod.yaml
  - name: create pod in Kubernetes
    command: kubectl create -f my-pod.yaml

file my-env-vars-prod.yaml:

mysql_root_password: supersecret

file my-env-vars-test.yaml:

mysql_root_password: notsosecret

Now you create the pod resource by running, for example:

ansible-playbook -e deploy=test my-playbook.yaml
  • 4
    Ideally you should be able to define a Secret (or the eventual config objects we will have) and have that injected as env vars. Unfortunately that work is not done yet, so I am voting for this. – Tim Hockin Nov 2 '15 at 16:09
  • Is this work in progress or on the road map? – Johan Nov 2 '15 at 17:36
  • If you're using ansible, we have a common role to deploy on kubernetes: github.com/ansibl8s/k8s-common. Then it's very easy to prepare new applications, see exemples how to use it in other repo: github.com/ansibl8s – ant31 Nov 4 '15 at 14:03
  • I am hoping that we will do secrets in env vars for 1.2 – Paul Morie Nov 8 '15 at 6:34
  • 1
    Note that there is a proposal for templates: github.com/kubernetes/kubernetes/blob/master/docs/proposals/… – luebken Feb 17 '16 at 11:11
1

This comment shows how to do this w/o having to update kubernetes config when list of environment variables change.

Essentially: 1) Make a secret with env.sh 2) Map secret into container as volume 3) Container's start script runs env.sh then app.

1

This works for me:

file env-secret.yaml

apiVersion: v1
kind: Secret
metadata:
  name: env-secret
type: Opaque
stringData:
  .env: |-
    APP_NAME=Laravel
    APP_ENV=local

and into the deployment.yaml or pod.yaml

spec:
  ...
        volumeMounts:
        - name: foo
          mountPath: "/var/www/html/.env"
          subPath: .env
      volumes:
      - name: foo
        secret:
          secretName: env-secret
````

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