1

I'm trying to test out the failure recovery behavior of ZeroMQ ( via pyzmq ) when using DEALER and ROUTER sockets. Here's my code:

import sys, zmq
import threading
import time, gc
import socket

def tprint(msg):
    """like print, but won't get newlines confused with multiple threads"""
    sys.stdout.write(msg + '\n')
    sys.stdout.flush()

class ClientWorker(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, id, ports):
        self.id = id
        self.ports = ports
        super(ClientWorker, self).__init__()

    def run(self):
        context = zmq.Context()
        socket = context.socket(zmq.DEALER)
        for port in self.ports:
            socket.connect("tcp://localhost:%d" % port)

        tprint("client %d started" % (self.id))
        for ia in xrange(self.id*100,self.id*100+100):
            socket.send_string('request %d' % (ia))
            time.sleep(1)

        socket.close()
        context.term()

class ServerWorker(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, port, maxReq=None):
        self.port = port
        self.maxReq = maxReq
        super(ServerWorker, self).__init__()

    def run(self):
        context = zmq.Context()
        socket = context.socket(zmq.ROUTER)

        socket.bind("tcp://127.0.0.1:%d" % (self.port))
        tprint("server started on port %d" % (self.port))

        numReq = 0
        while True:
            ident, msg = socket.recv_multipart()
            print self.port, ident, msg
            numReq += 1
            if self.maxReq and numReq >= self.maxReq:
                tprint("server on port %d exiting" % (self.port))
                break

        socket.unbind("tcp://127.0.0.1:%d" % (self.port))
        socket.close()
        context.term()

def main():
    ports = [5555,5556,5557]
    servers = [ServerWorker(port,10 if port==5555 else None) for port in ports]
    for s in servers: s.start()

    for ia in xrange(1,6):
        w = ClientWorker(ia, ports)
        w.start()

    servers[0].join()
    servers[0] = None
    gc.collect()
    time.sleep(30)
    tprint("restarting server")
    s = ServerWorker(port)
    s.start()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

The behavior I observe is as follows:

  • the server at 5555 will print out 10 items that it receives at which point it exits
  • the client workers will NOT detect this failure, and will continue sending items to that server
  • when I attempt to re-.bind() a new server thread to port 5555, I get the "Address in use" error
  • this despite my closing the socket, calling context.term(), attempting to gc the server object, etc.

Three questions:

  • Am I correct to expect that the DEALER sockets should be able to detect the failure of one of the servers and redistribute the work to the remaining servers? I suspect that perhaps the reason why it can't detect the failure is the same reason that the socket on port 5555 remains open?
  • Any ideas about the "Address in use" error?
  • Am I correct to expect that when I reconnect the server to port 5555, the clients will be able to detect the reconnection and resume sending messages to the server in a round-robin way taking into account the new server?
  • I just did another test with the above code using PUSH / PULL sockets in place of DEALER / ROUTER sockets, and observed the same behavior. My understanding is that PUSH / PULL should handle node failures on the PULL side automatically. Is this not correct? – John Nov 2 '15 at 14:05
  • I have no experience with Python, so I'm just going to comment - when a destination is unreachable, ZMQ will queue messages at the sender's side. Once the endpoint is available, it will deliver the messages. However, this is what happens when you bind/unbind - the unbinding isn't instant. It takes a while, and in C you can use zmq_socket_monitor to observe what's going on. Basically, if you want to simulate a crash, I suggest you spawn the server in a separate process so you can kill and reboot the process for testing purposes. Alternatively, delay the binding a second or so. – Mjh Nov 2 '15 at 14:12
2

Am I correct to expect that the DEALER sockets should be able to detect the failure of one of the servers and redistribute the work to the remaining servers?

No, this isn't how DEALERS work. DEALERs that connect load-balance across their peers, whether or not they are there. That means that messages are still queued to worker 5555, even while it's down. Those messages will be delivered immediately when worker 5555 returns.

Any ideas about the "Address in use" error?

This is caused by the fact that port when you start the resumed worker is ports[-1], not ports[0], so it's binding to a port that's still in use by one of your workers, not the one that stopped.

Am I correct to expect that when I reconnect the server to port 5555, the clients will be able to detect the reconnection and resume sending messages to the server in a round-robin way taking into account the new server?

Yes, messages will resume being delivered to 5555 when it comes back, but I think you aren't quite right about which messages will be delivered there.

With some minor adjustments to your script, I get the output:

server started on port 5555
server started on port 5556
server started on port 5557
client 1 started
client 2 started
client 3 started
client 4 started
client 5 started
5555 00800041a7 request 100
5555 00800041a8 request 200
5555 00800041a9 request 300
5555 00800041aa request 400
5555 00800041ab request 500
5556 0060b7acd9 request 101
5556 0060b7acdb request 301
5556 0060b7acdc request 401
5556 0060b7acdd request 501
5556 0060b7acda request 201
5557 004431b782 request 102
5557 004431b784 request 302
5557 004431b783 request 202
5557 004431b785 request 402
5557 004431b786 request 502
5555 00800041a7 request 103
5555 00800041a9 request 303
5555 00800041ab request 503
5555 00800041a8 request 203
5555 00800041aa request 403
server on port 5555 exiting
5556 0060b7acd9 request 104
5556 0060b7acda request 204
5556 0060b7acdd request 504
5556 0060b7acdb request 304
5556 0060b7acdc request 404
5557 004431b782 request 105
5557 004431b786 request 505
5557 004431b783 request 205
5557 004431b784 request 305
5557 004431b785 request 405
5556 0060b7acd9 request 107 <- note jump from 405 to 107
5556 0060b7acdc request 407
5556 0060b7acdd request 507
5556 0060b7acda request 207
5556 0060b7acdb request 307
restarting server on 5555
server started on port 5555
5557 004431b786 request 508
5557 004431b782 request 108
5557 004431b785 request 408
5557 004431b783 request 208
5557 004431b784 request 308
5555 0041c8aac3 request 506 <- here are the X06 messages on the new 5555 worker
5555 0041c8aac4 request 306
5555 0041c8aac5 request 406
5555 0041c8aac6 request 106
5555 0041c8aac7 request 206
5555 0041c8aac7 request 209
5555 0041c8aac4 request 309
5555 0041c8aac3 request 509
5555 0041c8aac5 request 409
5555 0041c8aac6 request 109
5556 0060b7acdd request 510
5556 0060b7acdb request 310
5556 0060b7acda request 210
5556 0060b7acdc request 410
5556 0060b7acd9 request 110
5557 004431b784 request 311
5557 004431b786 request 511
...

Messages 106-506 were sent to 5555 and redelivered later. They were not re-routed to another worker when 5555 wasn't there to receive them.

You can use client_socket.hwm = N to limit how many messages may be pending on a worker before the client should start excluding it from round-robin, but you can't make it zero.

The version of your script that I used:

from binascii import hexlify
import threading
import socket
import sys
import time

import zmq

def tprint(msg):
    """like print, but won't get newlines confused with multiple threads"""
    sys.stdout.write(msg + '\n')
    sys.stdout.flush()

class ClientWorker(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, id, ports):
        self.id = id
        self.ports = ports
        super(ClientWorker, self).__init__()

    def run(self):
        context = zmq.Context.instance()
        socket = context.socket(zmq.DEALER)
        socket.hwm = 1 # limit messages sent to dead workers
        for port in self.ports:
            socket.connect("tcp://localhost:%d" % port)

        tprint("client %d started" % (self.id))
        for ia in xrange(self.id*100,self.id*100+100):
            socket.send_string('request %d' % (ia))
            time.sleep(1)

        socket.close()
        context.term()

class ServerWorker(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, port, maxReq=None):
        self.port = port
        self.maxReq = maxReq
        super(ServerWorker, self).__init__()

    def run(self):
        context = zmq.Context.instance()
        socket = context.socket(zmq.ROUTER)

        tprint("server started on port %d" % (self.port))
        socket.bind("tcp://127.0.0.1:%d" % (self.port))

        numReq = 0
        while True:
            ident, msg = socket.recv_multipart()
            print self.port, hexlify(ident), msg
            numReq += 1
            if self.maxReq and numReq >= self.maxReq:
                tprint("server on port %d exiting" % (self.port))
                break

        socket.close()
        context.term()

def main():
    ports = [5555,5556,5557]
    servers = [ServerWorker(port,10 if port==5555 else None) for port in ports]
    for s in servers: s.start()

    for ia in xrange(1,6):
        w = ClientWorker(ia, ports)
        w.start()

    servers[0].join()
    time.sleep(10)
    port = ports[0]
    tprint("restarting server on %i" % port)
    s = ServerWorker(port)
    s.start()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    ctx = zmq.Context.instance()
    try:
        main()
    finally:
        ctx.term()
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.