14

How can the instruction rep stosb execute faster than this code?

    Clear: mov byte [edi],AL       ; Write the value in AL to memory
           inc edi                 ; Bump EDI to next byte in the buffer
           dec ecx                 ; Decrement ECX by one position
           jnz Clear               ; And loop again until ECX is 0

Is that guaranteed to be true on all modern CPUs? Should I always prefer to use rep stosb instead of writing the loop manually?

  • 5
    What kind of answer do you expect? rep stosb happens to be an optimized instruction for this purpose. – Jester Nov 2 '15 at 15:23
  • 1
    Hello Jester thank you very much for the prompt reply. Okay I'll put it this way.. there is an adder in CPU for adding. Likewise for the instruction "rep stosb" is there a separate circuit in the CPU? – Promod Sampath Elvitigala Nov 2 '15 at 16:49
29
0

In modern CPUs, rep stosb's and rep movsb's microcoded implementation actually uses stores that are wider than 1B, so it can go much faster than one byte per clock.

(Note this only applies to stos and movs, not repe cmpsb or repne scasb. They're still slow, unfortunately, like at best 2 cycles per byte compared on Skylake, which is pathetic vs. AVX2 vpcmpeqb for implementing memcmp or memchr. See https://agner.org/optimize/ for instruction tables, and other perf links in the x86 tag wiki.

See Why is this code 6.5x slower with optimizations enabled? for an example of gcc unwisely inlining repnz scasb or a less-bad scalar bithack for a strlen that happens to get large, and a simple SIMD alternative.)


rep stos/movs has significant startup overhead, but ramps up well for large memset/memcpy. (See the Intel/AMD's optimization manuals for discussion of when to use rep stos vs. a vectorized loop for small buffers.) Without the ERMSB feature, though, rep stosb is tuned for medium to small memsets and it's optimal to use rep stosd or rep stosq (if you aren't going to use a SIMD loop).

When single-stepping with a debugger, rep stos only does one iteration (one decrement of ecx/rcx), so the microcode implementation never gets going. Don't let this fool you into thinking that's all it can do.

See What setup does REP do? for some details of how Intel P6/SnB-family microarchitectures implement rep movs.

See Enhanced REP MOVSB for memcpy for memory-bandwidth considerations with rep movsb vs. an SSE or AVX loop, on Intel CPUs with the ERMSB feature. (Note especially that many-core Xeon CPUs can't saturate DRAM bandwidth with only a single thread, because of limits on how many cache misses are in flight at once, and also RFO vs. non-RFO store protocols.)


A modern Intel CPU should run the asm loop in the question at one iteration per clock, but an AMD bulldozer-family core probably can't even manage one store per clock. (Bottleneck on the two integer execution ports handling the inc/dec/branch instructions. If the loop condition was a cmp/jcc on edi, an AMD core could macro-fuse the compare-and-branch.)


One major feature of so-called Fast String operations (rep movs and rep stos on Intel P6 and SnB-family CPUs is that they avoid the read-for-ownership cache coherency traffic when storing to not-previously-cached memory. So it's like using NT stores to write whole cache lines, but still strongly ordered. (The ERMSB feature does use weakly-ordered stores).

IDK how good AMD's implementation is.


(And a correction: I previously said that Intel SnB can only handle a taken-branch throughput of one per 2 clocks, but in fact it can run tiny loops at one iteration per one clock.)

See the optimization resources (esp. Agner Fog's guides) linked from the tag wiki.


Intel IvyBridge and later also ERMSB, which lets rep stos[b/w/d/q] and rep movs[b/w/d/q] use weakly-ordered stores (like movnt), allowing the stores to commit to cache out-of-order. This is an advantage if not all of the destination is already hot in L1 cache. I believe, from the wording of the docs, that there's an implicit memory barrier at the end of a fast string op, so any reordering is only visible between stores made by the string op, not between it and other stores. i.e. you still don't need sfence after rep movs.

So for large aligned buffers on Intel IvB and later, a rep stos implementation of memset can beat any other implementation. One that uses movnt stores (which don't leave the data in cache) should also be close to saturating main memory write bandwidth, but may in practice not quite keep up. See comments for discussion of this, but I wasn't able to find any numbers.

For small buffers, different approaches have very different amounts of overhead. Microbenchmarks can make SSE/AVX copy-loops look better than they are, because doing a copy with the same size and alignment every time avoids branch mispredicts in the startup/cleanup code. IIRC, it's recommended to use a vectorized loop for copies under 128B on Intel CPUs (not rep movs). The threshold may be higher than that, depending on the CPU and the surrounding code.

Intel's optimization manual also has some discussion of overhead for different memcpy implementations, and that rep movsb has a larger penalty for misalignment than movdqu.


See the code for an optimized memset/memcpy implementation for more info on what is done in practice. (e.g. Agner Fog's library).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Great answer. I actually did a comparison of the different approaches some time ago, see here: stackoverflow.com/questions/27940150/… Unfortunately the full code has been removed by pastebin. – zx485 Nov 3 '15 at 10:00
  • Why is SNB limited to one byte per two clocks? More importantly, I am not sure your statement about rep stos and movnt on IVB and later is correct. I would argue it's the other way around. See my answer to whats-missing-sub-optimal-in-this-memcpy-implementation and also read the comments to my answer. – Z boson Nov 3 '15 at 12:56
  • @Zboson: my mistake, for some reason I thought I remembered finding that SnB couldn't do one-iteration-per-clock loops. Maybe my test was suffering from some weird alignment thing? Anyway, I just re-tested, and it can run a tiny loop at one iteration per clock after all. – Peter Cordes Nov 4 '15 at 0:13
  • 1
    crap, I'm going to have to go and fix all my recent answers where I included that error about SnB loop throughput. – Peter Cordes Nov 4 '15 at 0:26
  • 2
    From the link I pointed you to I wrote "So you mean I can do better than movntdqa for my 1 GB case?" and then Stephen Canon wrote "Yes, rep movsb is significantly faster than movntdqa when streaming to memory on Ivybridge and Haswell (but be aware that pre-Ivybridge it is slow!)" – Z boson Nov 4 '15 at 19:37
4
0

If your CPU has CPUID ERMSB bit, then rep movsb and rep stosb commands are executed differently than on older processors.

See Intel Optimization Reference Manual, section 3.7.6 Enhanced REP MOVSB and REP STOSB operation (ERMSB).

http://www.intel.com/content/dam/www/public/us/en/documents/manuals/64-ia-32-architectures-optimization-manual.pdf

Both the manual and my tests show that the benefits of REP STOSB appear only on large memory blocks, larger than 128 bytes. On smaller blocks, like 5 bytes, the code that you have shown (mov byte [edi],al;inc edi;dec ecx;jnz Clear) would be much faster, since the startup costs of REP STOSB are very high - about 35 cycles.

In order to get the benefits of REP STOSB on new processors with CPUID ERMSB bit, the following conditions shouls be met: - the destination buffer have to be aligned to a 16-Byte boundary; - if the length is a multiple of 64, it can produce even higher performance; - the direction bit should be set "forward" (CLD).

ERMSB begin to outperform other methods when the length is at least 128 bytes, because, as I wrote, there is high internal startup in ERMSB - about 35 cycles. ERMSB begin to clearly outperform other methods when the length is more than 2048 bytes.

When the destination buffer is 16-byte aligned, REP STOSB using ERMSB can perform better than SIMD approaches. When the destination buffer is misaligned, memset() performance using ERMSB can degrade about 20% relative to aligned case, for processors based on Intel microarchitecture code name Ivy Bridge. In contrast, SIMD implementation of REP STOSB will experience smaller degradation when the destination is misaligned.

I have Intel Core i5 6600 processor with 32K L1 cache, 256K L2 cache and 6MB L3 cache, and I could obtain ~100 GB/sec on REP STOSB with 32K blocks.

Here are the results of REP STOSB memset() implementation:

  • 1297920000 data blocks of 16 bytes took 13.6022 seconds to process by memset(); 1455.9909 Megabytes per second
  • 648960000 data blocks of 32 bytes took 6.7840 seconds to process by memset(); 2919.3058 Megabytes per second
  • 1622400000 data blocks of 64 bytes took 16.9762 seconds to process by memset(); 5833.0883 Megabytes per second
  • 817587402 data blocks of 127 bytes took 8.5698 seconds to process by memset(); 11554.8914 Megabytes per second
  • 811200000 data blocks of 128 bytes took 8.5197 seconds to process by memset(); 11622.9306 Megabytes per second
  • 804911628 data blocks of 129 bytes took 9.1513 seconds to process by memset(); 10820.6427 Megabytes per second
  • 407190588 data blocks of 255 bytes took 5.4656 seconds to process by memset(); 18117.7029 Megabytes per second
  • 405600000 data blocks of 256 bytes took 5.0314 seconds to process by memset(); 19681.1544 Megabytes per second
  • 202800000 data blocks of 512 bytes took 2.7403 seconds to process by memset(); 36135.8273 Megabytes per second
  • 101400000 data blocks of 1024 bytes took 1.6704 seconds to process by memset(); 59279.5229 Megabytes per second
  • 3168750 data blocks of 32768 bytes took 0.9525 seconds to process by memset(); 103957.8488 Megabytes per second
  • 2028000 data blocks of 51200 bytes took 1.5321 seconds to process by memset(); 64633.5697 Megabytes per second
  • 413878 data blocks of 250880 bytes took 1.7737 seconds to process by memset(); 55828.1341 Megabytes per second
  • 19805 data blocks of 5242880 bytes took 2.6009 seconds to process by memset(); 38073.0694 Megabytes per second

Here are the results of memset() implementation that uses MOVDQA [RCX],XMM0:

  • 1297920000 data blocks of 16 bytes took 3.5795 seconds to process by memset(); 5532.7798 Megabytes per second
  • 648960000 data blocks of 32 bytes took 5.5538 seconds to process by memset(); 3565.9727 Megabytes per second
  • 1622400000 data blocks of 64 bytes took 15.7489 seconds to process by memset(); 6287.6436 Megabytes per second
  • 817587402 data blocks of 127 bytes took 9.6637 seconds to process by memset(); 10246.9173 Megabytes per second
  • 811200000 data blocks of 128 bytes took 9.6236 seconds to process by memset(); 10289.6215 Megabytes per second
  • 804911628 data blocks of 129 bytes took 9.4852 seconds to process by memset(); 10439.7473 Megabytes per second
  • 407190588 data blocks of 255 bytes took 6.6156 seconds to process by memset(); 14968.1754 Megabytes per second
  • 405600000 data blocks of 256 bytes took 6.6437 seconds to process by memset(); 14904.9230 Megabytes per second
  • 202800000 data blocks of 512 bytes took 5.0695 seconds to process by memset(); 19533.2299 Megabytes per second
  • 101400000 data blocks of 1024 bytes took 4.3506 seconds to process by memset(); 22761.0460 Megabytes per second
  • 3168750 data blocks of 32768 bytes took 3.7269 seconds to process by memset(); 26569.8145 Megabytes per second
  • 2028000 data blocks of 51200 bytes took 4.0538 seconds to process by memset(); 24427.4096 Megabytes per second
  • 413878 data blocks of 250880 bytes took 3.9936 seconds to process by memset(); 24795.5548 Megabytes per second
  • 19805 data blocks of 5242880 bytes took 4.5892 seconds to process by memset(); 21577.7860 Megabytes per second

As you see, on 64-bit blocks REP MOVSB is slower, but starting from 128-byte blocks, REP MOVSB begin to outperform other methods, and the difference is very significant starting from 512-byte blocks and longer.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.