1

I have to print numbers with max N bits where count of bits set to 1 = count of bits set to 0. I ignoring leading zeros. I thinking that this applies only when count of bits is even.

My code:

int power(k) {
   return 1 << k;
}


void print_numbers(int n){

   n      -= (n % 2); // FOR EVEN COUNT OF BITS
   int exp = 1; // EXPONENTS WILL BE ODD (2^1, 2^3, 2^5, ...)

   while (exp < n) {

       int start        = power(exp);
       int end          = power(exp + 1);
       int ones         = (exp + 1) / 2; // ALLOWED COUNT OF 1

       for (int i = start; i < end; i++) { 
          int bits_count = 0;

          for (int j = 0; j <= exp; j++){ // CHECK COUNT OF 1
             bits_count += ((i >> j) & 1);
          }
          if (bits_count == ones){
             printf("%d\n", i);
          }
       }
       exp += 2;
   }

For N = 12 this function print 637 numbers. Is this solution correct or am i wrong? Any idea for more efficient or better solution?

  • 2
    Looks like a question for codereview.stackexchange.com, assuming the code works. – vaultah Nov 2 '15 at 15:38
  • 1
    So are you counting the bit-length starting at the highest-order one-bit? In other words, is the first bit of every number always a 1? – rici Nov 2 '15 at 15:45
  • 1
    @VladfromMoscow: he means that the number of bits set to 1 is equal to the number of bits set to 0, such as 11001100. – John Bode Nov 2 '15 at 15:47
  • 1
    MLN96: "every number starts with a 1" is, IMHO, a clearer statement than a partial list of examples which seem to conform to that simple description, as evidenced by @Thomas's question :) – rici Nov 2 '15 at 16:01
  • 2
    Anyway, if you mean that all numbers start with a 1, then the number of "balanced" numbers of length 2k is C(2k, k-1) (where C is the binomial function), and the sum of C(2k, k-1) for k from 1 to 6 is indeed 637. FWIW. – rici Nov 2 '15 at 16:03
1

I came up with this, which is a totally different approach (and perfectible) but works:

#include <stdio.h>

void checker(int number)
{
    int c;
    int zeros = 0;
    int ones = 0;

    for (c = 31; c >= 0; c--)
    {
        if (number >> c & 1) 
        {
            ones++;
        }
        else if(ones > 0)
        {
            zeros++;
        }
    }
    if(zeros == ones)
    {
        printf("%i\n", number);
    }
}

int main()
{
    int c;
    for (c = 4095; c >= 0; c--)
    {
        checker(c);
    }
    return 0;
}

Which get me 638 values (including 0)

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