3

Imagine this: You want to make some things with a XML element you receive in a method. So you try this:

function makeNiceThings(XMLDOM){
    if(XMLDOM.getElementsByTagName("err")){
        makeReallyNiceThings(XMLDOM.getElementsByTagName("err")[0].childNodes[0].nodeValue);
    }
}

So, Javascript tells you you're trying to call childNodes[0] from a null reference. But if you try:

  function makeNiceThings(XMLDOM){
        if(XMLDOM.getElementsByTagName("err")[0]){
            makeReallyNiceThings(XMLDOM.getElementsByTagName("err")[0].childNodes[0].nodeValue);
        }
    }

It works flawlessly.

However, you update the page sometimes, and both are working again, no problems at all.

I have already faces so many situations like this, that I really want to know if there is a place I can show these bizarre errors in order to make javascript even better. Google returned me nothing but places to discover programmer errors. Ideas?

10
  • 7
    Bugs with JavaScript itself should be reported to the bug tracker of the browser. Though, chances are this is not a bug with JavaScript.
    – gen_Eric
    Nov 2, 2015 at 17:08
  • 5
    Well, I don't see an issue there. In the first example you may get and empty array which is not nothing. So the condition becomes true. Whereas in the second example you do what you really meant to do — check if there's an element with index 0.
    – Timofey
    Nov 2, 2015 at 17:09
  • 3
    Well, this is a programmer mistake. And no, JavaScript will not be changed to treat arrays (or rather, NodeLists/HTMLCollections) as falsy, as that would like break thousands of other web pages.
    – Bergi
    Nov 2, 2015 at 17:11
  • 4
    @MrGuliarte: No, in the case where you did got an exception with your first snippet, the condition in the second did not evaluate to true. And that's the difference. JS did behave as expected.
    – Bergi
    Nov 2, 2015 at 17:14
  • 3
    Report ECMAScript bugs to ECMA, DOM bugs to W3C, and implementation bugs to the implementator.
    – Oriol
    Nov 2, 2015 at 17:17

1 Answer 1

5

Well, I don't see an issue there. In the first example you may get and empty array which is not nothing. So the condition becomes true. Whereas in the second example you do what you really meant to do — check if there's an element with index 0.
Or, if you are really convinced that this is not your fault, you should do what Rocket Hazmat said:

Bugs with JavaScript itself should be reported to the bug tracker of the browser. Though, chances are this is not a bug with JavaScript.

But most probably this is a mistake in the code. If there's no err elements, you'll get an empty array and the condition will be evaluated to true; but there's no 0th element — that's why you get an exeption.
Hope that was clear.

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