5

The following simple program can't be compiled in cygwin with gcc

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::cout << std::to_string(4) << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

Command line:

$ g++ -std=c++0x to_string.cc

Error:

to_string.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
to_string.cc:6:16: error: ‘to_string’ is not a member of ‘std’
   std::cout << std::to_string(4) << std::endl;

G++ version:

$ g++ --version
g++ (GCC) 5.2.0
Copyright (C) 2015 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

The same code can be compiled in Ubuntu.

Is it possible at all compile this code with cygwin or I need to write a workaround?

8
  • 1
    You may need to use -std=c++11 instead of -std=c++0x – NathanOliver Nov 3 '15 at 13:15
  • 1
    @NathanOliver the same result. – Alex Nov 3 '15 at 13:15
  • Have you checked which <string> header is used? – Simon Kraemer Nov 3 '15 at 13:24
  • @SimonKraemer What exactly do you mean and how can I do it? – Alex Nov 3 '15 at 13:25
  • Try g++ -E -x c++ -std=c++11 - -v < /dev/null – Simon Kraemer Nov 3 '15 at 13:43
-2

You are mixing gcc and g++ here

To quote Mike F: "The probably most important difference in their defaults is which libraries they link against automatically."

What is the difference between g++ and gcc?

4
  • I edited my question. – Alex Nov 3 '15 at 13:22
  • 3
    He obviously uses g++ to compile the file, see his command line. So this should be totally fine. – leemes Nov 3 '15 at 13:26
  • @leemes Why don't you check the times on my answer and Alex's edit? – Simon Kraemer Nov 3 '15 at 13:39
  • 1
    The command line uses g++ before the edit... – leemes Nov 3 '15 at 13:44

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