311

I have a form that has a submit button in it somewhere.

However, I would like to somehow 'catch' the submit event and prevent it from occurring.

Is there some way I can do this?

I can't modify the submit button, because it's part of a custom control.

3
  • 1
    You could still access the submit button. Render the page and grab its ClientID by viewing the page source. Then, using something like jQuery you could do something like $('#ctl01_cph01_controlBtn1').click(function() {return false;});
    – rebelliard
    Jul 28, 2010 at 5:59
  • 1
    @Rafael: True... but that would be a last resort - this is a very complex control. Jul 28, 2010 at 6:00
  • 1
    @Raf that's asp.net based, and also not a best practice. But its essentially correct. I'd just avoid peeking at the source and using the control name, as it may change if someone edits the page. Unintended side effects and such.
    – user1228
    Jul 28, 2010 at 11:40

11 Answers 11

349

Unlike the other answers, return false is only part of the answer. Consider the scenario in which a JS error occurs prior to the return statement...

html

<form onsubmit="return mySubmitFunction(event)">
  ...
</form>

script

function mySubmitFunction()
{
  someBug()
  return false;
}

returning false here won't be executed and the form will be submitted either way. You should also call preventDefault to prevent the default form action for Ajax form submissions.

function mySubmitFunction(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  someBug();
  return false;
}

In this case, even with the bug the form won't submit!

Alternatively, a try...catch block could be used.

function mySubmit(e) { 
  e.preventDefault(); 
  try {
   someBug();
  } catch (e) {
   throw new Error(e.message);
  }
  return false;
}
10
  • 6
    Why not return false directly from onsumbit?
    – ProfK
    Mar 22, 2013 at 9:02
  • 3
    You might want to show an error message to the user in the onsubmit. Fore example, "complete this mandatory field then submit". In that case event.preventDefault will come in very handy May 3, 2013 at 9:26
  • 13
    <form onsubmit="return mySubmitFunction(event)"> worked ... had to use the word event in brackets in firefox
    – danday74
    Sep 17, 2016 at 23:37
  • 7
    @BenRowe You Should add evt parameter to the called method. (<form onsubmit="return mySubmitFunction(evt)">) .Otherwise it gives Undefined error.
    – yigitt
    Jan 27, 2017 at 10:21
  • 2
    I had to use the exact word event as parameter in Chrome, just if anyone's struggling with this.. Oct 18, 2018 at 18:32
155

You can use inline event onsubmit like this

<form onsubmit="alert('stop submit'); return false;" >

Or

<script>
   function toSubmit(){
      alert('I will not submit');
      return false;
   }
</script>

<form onsubmit="return toSubmit();" >

Demo

Now, this may be not a good idea when making big projects. You may need to use Event Listeners.

Please read more about Inline Events vs Event Listeners (addEventListener and IE's attachEvent) here. For I can not explain it more than Chris Baker did.

Both are correct, but none of them are "best" per se, and there may be a reason the developer chose to use both approaches.

2
  • 1
    Nice, quickly solution on the road. Sep 2, 2019 at 21:30
  • 2
    for some reason, <form onsubmit="return false;" > does not work for me.
    – rrswa
    Apr 28, 2020 at 14:34
130

Attach an event listener to the form using .addEventListener() and then call the .preventDefault() method on event:

const element = document.querySelector('form');
element.addEventListener('submit', event => {
  event.preventDefault();
  // actual logic, e.g. validate the form
  console.log('Form submission cancelled.');
});
<form>
  <button type="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

I think it's a better solution than defining a submit event handler inline with the onsubmit attribute because it separates webpage logic and structure. It's much easier to maintain a project where logic is separated from HTML. See: Unobtrusive JavaScript.

Using the .onsubmit property of the form DOM object is not a good idea because it prevents you from attaching multiple submit callbacks to one element. See addEventListener vs onclick .

4
  • 2
    & for jquery: $("button").click(function(e) { e.preventDefault() });
    – Nixen85
    Mar 20, 2018 at 15:23
  • 6
    +1 dunno why all the other answers keep using inline onsubmits, since OP mentioned he can't change button (which means he probably can't change form either). Wondering if there's a way to get the 'form' if we have the button id Jun 14, 2019 at 3:32
  • 2
    Inline trash still the most voted, but thats not really the way of programming in JS since...2012? This Solution is THE solution. Feb 3, 2021 at 19:22
  • 1
    I like most of this solution, but I avoid using querySelector because it returns the first element in the document matching the given selector. This can make your code break if a second form is later added earlier in the page, something that happens frequently, such as if you decide to later add a login form to the header, or even if an invisible or hidden form is added by a CMS module. (I've seen this happen on projects.) Using getElementById is more reliable because the ID must be unique, at least per DOM tree, according to HTML specifications, and validators will catch when it is not.
    – cazort
    Nov 12, 2021 at 21:03
18

The following works as of now (tested in chrome and firefox):

<form onsubmit="event.preventDefault(); return validateMyForm();">

where validateMyForm() is a function that returns false if validation fails. The key point is to use the name event. We cannot use for e.g. e.preventDefault()

1
  • 1
    onsubmit="return validateMyForm();" is enough but validateMyForm() should return true or false.
    – Adrian P.
    Sep 30, 2016 at 18:55
17

Try this one...

HTML Code

<form class="submit">
    <input type="text" name="text1"/>
    <input type="text" name="text2"/>
    <input type="submit" name="Submit" value="submit"/>
</form>

jQuery Code

$(function(){
    $('.submit').on('submit', function(event){
        event.preventDefault();
        alert("Form Submission stopped.");
    });
});

or

$(function(){
    $('.submit').on('submit', function(event){
       event.preventDefault();
       event.stopPropagation();
       alert("Form Submission prevented / stopped.");
    });
});
4
  • 27
    There is no jQuery tag in this question. Dec 18, 2015 at 2:33
  • 7
    @Gothdo and yet the solution is still the same. crazy right?
    – Kevin B
    Jan 26, 2016 at 23:27
  • 7
    @Gothdo yea, it's exactly the same. eventObject.preventDefault. The way you bind the handler doesn't change the solution. I would even argue your answer is no different than the accepted one.
    – Kevin B
    Jan 26, 2016 at 23:44
  • stopPropagation was the only thing that worked in my case. thanks! :)
    – cregox
    Mar 11, 2017 at 12:32
7
var form = document.getElementById("idOfForm");
form.onsubmit = function() {
  return false;
}
2
  • 2
    I think that using .onsubmit is a bad idea because it prevents you from attaching multiple submit callbacks to one element. I recommend using .addEventListener(). Dec 18, 2015 at 2:33
  • 3
    Even if you have set an event handler via the property .onsubmit, you can still add additional handlers via .addEventListener(). The handler registered by the property will be invoked first then the ones registered with .addEventListener() in the order in which they were registered. Jan 2, 2016 at 21:37
7

For prevent form from submittion you only need to do this.

<form onsubmit="event.preventDefault()">
    .....
</form>

By using above code this will prevent your form submittion.

3

To follow unobtrusive JavaScript programming conventions, and depending on how quickly the DOM will load, it may be a good idea to use the following:

<form onsubmit="return false;"></form>

Then wire up events using the onload or DOM ready if you're using a library.

$(function() {
    var $form = $('#my-form');
    $form.removeAttr('onsubmit');
    $form.submit(function(ev) {
        // quick validation example...
        $form.children('input[type="text"]').each(function(){
            if($(this).val().length == 0) {
                alert('You are missing a field');
                ev.preventDefault();
            }
        });
    });
});
label {
    display: block;
}

#my-form > input[type="text"] {
    background: cyan;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<form id="my-form" action="http://google.com" method="GET" onsubmit="return false;">
    <label>Your first name</label>
    <input type="text" name="first-name"/>
    <label>Your last name</label>
    <input type="text" name="last-name" /> <br />
    <input type="submit" />
</form>

Also, I would always use the action attribute as some people may have some plugin like NoScript running which would then break the validation. If you're using the action attribute, at the very least your user will get redirected by the server based on the backend validation. If you're using something like window.location, on the other hand, things will be bad.

0

You can add eventListner to the form, that preventDefault() and convert form data to JSON as below:

const formToJSON = elements => [].reduce.call(elements, (data, element) => {
  data[element.name] = element.value;
  return data;

}, {});

const handleFormSubmit = event => {
    event.preventDefault();
    const data = formToJSON(form.elements);
    console.log(data);
  //  const odata = JSON.stringify(data, null, "  ");
  const jdata = JSON.stringify(data);
    console.log(jdata);

    (async () => {
      const rawResponse = await fetch('/', {
        method: 'POST',
        headers: {
          'Accept': 'application/json',
          'Content-Type': 'application/json'
        },
        body: jdata
      });
      const content = await rawResponse.json();

      console.log(content);
    })();
};

const form = document.forms['myForm']; 
form.addEventListener('submit', handleFormSubmit);
<form id="myForm" action="/" method="post" accept-charset="utf-8">
    <label>Checkbox:
        <input type="checkbox" name="checkbox" value="on">
    </label><br /><br />

    <label>Number:
        <input name="number" type="number" value="123" />
    </label><br /><br />

    <label>Password:
        <input name="password" type="password" />
    </label>
    <br /><br />

    <label for="radio">Type:
        <label for="a">A
            <input type="radio" name="radio" id="a" value="a" />
        </label>
        <label for="b">B
            <input type="radio" name="radio" id="b" value="b" checked />
        </label>
        <label for="c">C
            <input type="radio" name="radio" id="c" value="c" />
        </label>
    </label>
    <br /><br />

    <label>Textarea:
        <textarea name="text_area" rows="10" cols="50">Write something here.</textarea>
    </label>
    <br /><br />

    <label>Select:
        <select name="select">
            <option value="a">Value A</option>
            <option value="b" selected>Value B</option>
            <option value="c">Value C</option>
        </select>
    </label>
    <br /><br />

    <label>Submit:
        <input type="submit" value="Login">
    </label>
    <br /><br />


</form>

-1
<form v-on:submit.prevent="yourMethodHere">

The submit event will no longer reload the page. It runs your method.

From vue documentation: https://vuejs.org/guide/essentials/event-handling.html#event-modifiers

2
  • 1
    Please read How do I write a good answer?. While this code block may answer the OP's question, this answer would be much more useful if you explain how this code is different from the code in the question, what you've changed, why you've changed it and why that solves the problem without introducing others. Jun 25 at 13:42
  • This question is not about Vue. Please update or remove this answer.
    – Sean
    Sep 2 at 23:16
-4

Here my answer :

<form onsubmit="event.preventDefault();searchOrder(event);">
...
</form>
<script>
const searchOrder = e => {
    e.preventDefault();
    const name = e.target.name.value;
    renderSearching();

    return false;
}
</script>

I add event.preventDefault(); on onsubmit and it works.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.