31

I have a pretty big table (around 1 billion rows), and I need to update the id type from SERIAL to BIGSERIAL; guess why?:).

Basically this could be done with this command:

execute "ALTER TABLE my_table ALTER COLUMN id SET DATA TYPE bigint"

Nevertheless that would lock my table forever and put my web service down.

Is there a quite simple way of doing this operation concurrently (whatever the time it will take)?

3 Answers 3

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If you don't have foreign keys pointing your id you could add new column, fill it, drop old one and rename new to old:

alter table my_table add column new_id bigint;

begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 0 and 100000; commit;
begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 100001 and 200000; commit;
begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 200001 and 300000; commit;
begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 300001 and 400000; commit;
...

create unique index my_table_pk_idx on my_table(new_id);

begin;
alter table my_table drop constraint my_table_pk;
alter table my_table alter column new_id set default nextval('my_table_id_seq'::regclass);
update my_table set new_id = id where new_id is null;
alter table my_table add constraint my_table_pk primary key using index my_table_pk_idx;
alter table my_table drop column id;
alter table my_table rename column new_id to id;
commit;
9
  • 1
    Thanks, this solution is pretty elegant. It seems to me that there is still a problem. When new rows will be inserted into our table while we are filling the new_id columns, the new_id value won't be set and the unique index creation may fail. Can we add a trigger setting new_id at insertion during until we add the nexval default value on it? Nov 4, 2015 at 9:35
  • Unique index ignores null values, so there is no need for trigger. Nov 4, 2015 at 11:28
  • What if alter table my_table add column new_id bigint; takes long time (It takes more than 1 hour and not finished yet), and block other read operations? Feb 14, 2017 at 10:15
  • Honestly: I don't know :). Maybe ask separate question how it is possible to speed up adding column itself? Feb 14, 2017 at 16:47
  • 2
    When you say "If you don't have foreign keys pointing your id", what does that mean? Do you mean this solution won't work if any other table have a column that is a foreign key to this table?
    – TheJKFever
    Jan 10, 2019 at 2:33
2

Radek's solution looks great. I would add a comment if I had the reputation for it, but I just want to mention that if you are doing this you'll likely want to widen the sequence for the primary key as well.

ALTER SEQUENCE my_table_id_seq AS bigint;

If you just widen the column type, you'll still end up with problems when you hit 2 billion records if the sequence is still integer sized.

I think the issue that James points out about adding the primary key requiring a table scan can be solved with the NOT VALID/VALIDATE dance. Instead of doing alter table my_table add constraint my_table_pk primary key using index my_table_pk_idx;, you can do

ALTER TABLE my_table ADD UNIQUE USING INDEX my_table_pk_idx;
ALTER TABLE my_table ADD CONSTRAINT my_table_id_not_null CHECK (id IS NOT NULL) NOT VALID;
ALTER TABLE my_table VALIDATE CONSTRAINT my_table_id_not_null;

I think it's also worth mentioning that

create unique index my_table_pk_idx on my_table(new_id);

will do a full table scan with an exclusive lock on my_table. It is better to do

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX CONCURRENTLY ON my_table(new_id);
0

I tried @radek-postołowicz solution, but it failed for me as I needed to set the new_id column as not null, and that locks the table for a long time.

My solution:

  1. Select records from the old table, and insert it into a new table my_table_new with id being bigint. Run this as a standalone transaction.
  2. In another transaction: do the step 1) again for the records which could have been created in the meantime, drop my_table and rename my_table_new to my_table.

The downside of this solution is that it auto-scaled the storage of my AWS RDS, and it could not be scaled back.

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