21

I have a pretty big table (around 1 billion rows), and I need to update the id type from SERIAL to BIGSERIAL; guess why?:).

Basically this could be done with this command:

execute "ALTER TABLE my_table ALTER COLUMN id SET DATA TYPE bigint"

Nevertheless that would lock my table forever and put my web service down.

Is there a quite simple way of doing this operation concurrently (whatever the time it will take)?

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19

If you don't have foreign keys pointing your id you could add new column, fill it, drop old one and rename new to old:

alter table my_table add column new_id bigint;

begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 0 and 100000; commit;
begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 100001 and 200000; commit;
begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 200001 and 300000; commit;
begin; update my_table set new_id = id where id between 300001 and 400000; commit;
...

create unique index my_table_pk_idx on my_table(new_id);

begin;
alter table my_table drop constraint my_table_pk;
alter table my_table alter column new_id set default nextval('my_table_id_seq'::regclass);
update my_table set new_id = id where new_id is null;
alter table my_table add constraint my_table_pk primary key using index my_table_pk_idx;
alter table my_table drop column id;
alter table my_table rename column new_id to id;
commit;
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  • Thanks, this solution is pretty elegant. It seems to me that there is still a problem. When new rows will be inserted into our table while we are filling the new_id columns, the new_id value won't be set and the unique index creation may fail. Can we add a trigger setting new_id at insertion during until we add the nexval default value on it? – Pierre Michard Nov 4 '15 at 9:35
  • Unique index ignores null values, so there is no need for trigger. – Radek Postołowicz Nov 4 '15 at 11:28
  • What if alter table my_table add column new_id bigint; takes long time (It takes more than 1 hour and not finished yet), and block other read operations? – Cheok Yan Cheng Feb 14 '17 at 10:15
  • Honestly: I don't know :). Maybe ask separate question how it is possible to speed up adding column itself? – Radek Postołowicz Feb 14 '17 at 16:47
  • 1
    When you say "If you don't have foreign keys pointing your id", what does that mean? Do you mean this solution won't work if any other table have a column that is a foreign key to this table? – TheJKFever Jan 10 '19 at 2:33

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