0

For a randomly generated 100 Bernoulli trials:

11010101....
  1. How to use "R" to compute di-bit counts, namely the number of times one sees in the sequence each of 00, 01,10,11
  2. How to use "R" to compute tri-bit counts, namely the number of times one sees in the sequence each of 000, 001, 010, 011,100,101,110,111
0
2

Note that if you pasted together the first 99 random draws with the last 99 that you would have all di-bit draws:

set.seed(144)
trials <- rbinom(100, 1, c(.5, .5))
table(paste0(head(trials, -1), tail(trials, -1)))
# 00 01 10 11 
# 21 28 28 22 

To get the tri-bit counts, you could extend this by pasting together the first 98, the middle 98, and the last 98 observations:

table(paste0(head(trials, -2), head(tail(trials, -1), -1), tail(trials, -2)))
# 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111 
#   9  11  14  14  12  16  14   8 

Riffing off of @MrFlick's comment below about the possibility of using embed, you could generate the counts for n consecutive bits in a vectorized way (aka calling paste0 once instead of once per row) with:

nbit <- function(dat, n) {
  e <- embed(dat, n)
  table(do.call(paste0, rev(split(e, col(e)))))
}
nbit(trials, 2)
# 00 01 10 11 
# 21 28 28 22 
nbit(trials, 3)
# 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111 
#   9  11  14  14  12  16  14   8 
2
  • It worked amazingly! But, why? Would you explain it to me a bit more? – andrew Nov 3 '15 at 21:15
  • The embed function can help create the pairs/triplets. The only catch is that it puts them in reverse order: apply(embed(trials,2),1,paste0, collapse="") – MrFlick Nov 3 '15 at 21:39

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