26

I have three images (transparent pngs)

Image 1

Image 2

Image 3

which are stacked using following html/css

<div style="position: relative; left: 0; top: 0;">
    <img src="img/main.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" />
    <img src="img/middle.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;"/>
    <img src="img/center.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;"/>
</div>

to get this:

Image 4

I want to add hover effect on each of these images(zoom in, border, opacity etc).

A normal CSS for a zoom in on hover would be:

img {
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease; /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transition: all 1s ease; /* Firefox */
    -ms-transition: all 1s ease; /* IE 9 */
    -o-transition: all 1s ease; /* Opera */
    transition: all 1s ease;
}

img:hover {
    -webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transform:scale(1.25); /* Firefox */
    -ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
    -o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
     transform:scale(1.25);
}

which doesn't work in this case because the hover effect gets applied to the whole image not just the image part (images have transparent background).

My question is, is it possible to style transparent images with CSS that are of irregular shapes?

jsfiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/h4mxysw5/

Edit:

There seems to be a confusion. I do not want to zoom all three images at once.

For example - when hovered over the center image, I want just the center image to zoom (not all).

Updated jsfiddle with border: http://jsfiddle.net/h4mxysw5/4/

  • 4
    Since these seem to be reasonably simple shapes, have you considered using SVG? – php_nub_qq Nov 8 '15 at 19:09
  • 1
    @php_nub_qq I thought of it but I have complex images as well. I am analysing the possible solutions (e.g. Flash etc) – WhatisSober Nov 8 '15 at 19:33
  • you can select any child of the wrapper with :nth-child selector. But i suggest you position the imgs with different top, left and z-index and why you need images for all imgs? The two inside circle are simple to reproduce with simple html/css (border-radius). – keypaul Nov 8 '15 at 19:33
25
+50

Two things you have to do.

  • Crop you images to fit only the space need by them, not the whole container size so they don't overlap each other.
  • Remove the :hover from the div and add a :hover behaviour to each image by using the img selector.

Here's the example:

div {
    margin: 50px; /* Just for demo purposes */
}

img {
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease; /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transition: all 1s ease; /* Firefox */
    -ms-transition: all 1s ease; /* IE 9 */
    -o-transition: all 1s ease; /* Opera */
    transition: all 1s ease;
}

img:hover {
    -webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transform:scale(1.25); /* Firefox */
    -ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
    -o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
     transform:scale(1.25);
}
<div style="position: relative; left: 0; top: 0;">
    <img class="one" src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/bFfbC.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" />
    <img class="two" src="http://i.imgur.com/iEwbExs.png" style="position: absolute; top: 76px; left: 72px;"/>
    <img class="three" src="http://i.imgur.com/hdwFlUv.png" style="position: absolute; top: 102px; left: 100px;"/>
</div>

Update

Check what you can do with SVGs:

path {
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease; /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transition: all 1s ease; /* Firefox */
    -ms-transition: all 1s ease; /* IE 9 */
    -o-transition: all 1s ease; /* Opera */
    transition: all 1s ease;
    transform-origin: center center;
}

path:hover {
    -webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transform:scale(1.25); /* Firefox */
    -ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
    -o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
     transform:scale(1.25);
}
<svg width="400px" height="400px">
    <g id="Page-1" stroke="none" stroke-width="1" fill="none" fill-rule="evenodd">
        <path d="M140.5,178 C161.210678,178 178,161.210678 178,140.5 C178,119.789322 161.210678,103 140.5,103 C119.789322,103 103,119.789322 103,140.5 C103,161.210678 119.789322,178 140.5,178 Z M141,158 C150.388841,158 158,150.388841 158,141 C158,131.611159 150.388841,124 141,124 C131.611159,124 124,131.611159 124,141 C124,150.388841 131.611159,158 141,158 Z" fill="#4BA1DF"></path>
            <path d="M140,205 C175.898509,205 205,175.898509 205,140 C205,104.101491 175.898509,75 140,75 C104.101491,75 75,104.101491 75,140 C75,175.898509 104.101491,205 140,205 Z M140,189 C167.061953,189 189,167.061953 189,140 C189,112.938047 167.061953,91 140,91 C112.938047,91 91,112.938047 91,140 C91,167.061953 112.938047,189 140,189 Z" fill="#4BA1DF"></path>
            <path d="M140,280 C217.319865,280 280,217.319865 280,140 C280,62.680135 217.319865,0 140,0 C62.680135,0 0,62.680135 0,140 C0,217.319865 62.680135,280 140,280 L140,280 Z M140.5,226 C187.720346,226 226,187.720346 226,140.5 C226,93.2796539 187.720346,55 140.5,55 C93.2796539,55 55,93.2796539 55,140.5 C55,187.720346 93.2796539,226 140.5,226 L140.5,226 Z" fill="#4BA1DF"></path>
    </g>
</svg>

| improve this answer | |
  • @Dave As shown here: jsfiddle.net/afLmrmmk/2 the background also gets hover effect. Is it possible to apply this only to visible(image) part? – WhatisSober Nov 8 '15 at 19:53
  • You can achieve that behavior using SVGs but is more complicated than this. This way you can't add the hover just to the blue part because the image is a rectangle and it doesn't care about the colors or active regions inside that rectangle – David Gomez Nov 8 '15 at 19:59
  • 2
    Piggybacking this answer - you can add border radius and get away with more accurate hover areas: jsfiddle.net/afLmrmmk/4 – Brian John Nov 13 '15 at 17:05
  • @DaveGomez How do you convert images to SVG? – WhatisSober Nov 16 '15 at 21:55
  • 1
    You can't @WhatisSober, you must explicitly create the image as an SVG using any vector image creation tool, but the burden of creating your images as SVG will be compensated with the flexibility and the image quality that only SVG images can offer you. – David Gomez Nov 16 '15 at 21:57
11

The main issue here is that all of the images you have used are the same size - So because they are sitting on top of each other, you will only ever be hovering over the top one. Just because the image is transparent it will still trigger :hover when you hover over any part of the image. To demonstrate using your own CSS, this is how you could do it without images:

div > div {
-webkit-transition: all 1s ease; /* Safari and Chrome */
-moz-transition: all 1s ease; /* Firefox */
-ms-transition: all 1s ease; /* IE 9 */
-o-transition: all 1s ease; /* Opera */
transition: all 1s ease;
border:10px solid #f00;
border-radius:50%;
position: absolute; 
 }

.outer {
width:200px;
height:200px;
    top: 25px; 
left: 25px;
border:30px solid #f00;
}
.middle {
width:150px;
height:150px;
    top: 60px; 
left: 60px;
border:20px solid #f00;
}
.inner {
width:100px;
height:100px;
top: 95px; 
left: 95px;
border:10px solid #f00;
}

div > div:hover {
-webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
-moz-transform:scale(1.25); /* Firefox */
-ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
-o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
 transform:scale(1.25);
}
<div style="position: relative; left: 0; top: 0;">
    <div class="outer"></div><div class="middle"></div><div class="inner"></div>
</div>

And here, with a bit of tweaking you can use the same CSS but also using the images as "background-images" to give the effect you are trying to achieve.

div > div {
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease; /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transition: all 1s ease; /* Firefox */
    -ms-transition: all 1s ease; /* IE 9 */
    -o-transition: all 1s ease; /* Opera */
    transition: all 1s ease;
    border:1px solid #f00;
border-radius:50%;
position: absolute; 
 }

.outer {
    width:280px;
    height:280px;
        top: 25px; 
    left: 25px;
    background-image:url(http://i.stack.imgur.com/bFfbC.png);
}
.middle {
    width:130px;
    height:130px;
        top: 100px; 
    left: 100px;
    background-image:url(http://i.stack.imgur.com/Eewcq.png);
    background-position:center;
}
.inner {
    width:75px;
    height:75px;
    top: 125px; 
    left: 125px;
    background-image:url(http://i.stack.imgur.com/VXk7A.png);
    background-position:center;
}

div > div:hover {
    -webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transform:scale(1.25); /* Firefox */
    -ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
    -o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
     transform:scale(1.25);
}
<div style="position: relative; left: 0; top: 0;">
    <div class="outer"></div>
    <div class="middle"></div>
    <div class="inner"></div>
</div>

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is what I am trying to achieve but with images. Is it possible to use images in place of outer, inner, middle elements? – WhatisSober Nov 8 '15 at 19:36
  • 1
    Yes, you can but you need to make sure that the images are not overlapping each other. If you imagine that you have 3 images positioned absolutely, you will only ever be able to hover over 1 of them if they are all the same size (the one with the highest z-index). I'll make some images now and will update my answer – wf4 Nov 8 '15 at 19:38
  • 3
    How is not using the images in the question an answer at all. Just a comment about border-radius. – Shikkediel Nov 8 '15 at 19:39
  • 1
    Its showing that the technique being used by the OP works, but the implementation is not. The previous answers do not seem to be grasping what the OP is asking. @Shikkediel – wf4 Nov 8 '15 at 19:42
  • 2
    That last bit is true in any case. ;-) – Shikkediel Nov 8 '15 at 19:47
8

Out of sheer curiosity if it could be done I just needed to create a CSS only version. While it doesn't use the images as the OP required, I still think, as an alternative to img and/or JS, the result is worth posting.

In the snippet you will see both an unshaded and shaded version. Please do give your comments...

(btw: tested in FF DE 44+, Chrome 46+ and IE11+ on W7)

html, body      { box-sizing: border-box; 
                  height: 100%; width: 100%; background-color: #f9f7f1;
                  margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px;
                  cursor: default }
*, *:before, 
*:after         { box-sizing: inherit }

.donut-button   { position: relative;
                  width:  280px;
                  height: 280px; 
                  margin: 100px auto;
                  cursor: pointer }

.r-outer        { width: 100%; height: 100%; border-width: 55px; top:  0.0%; left:  0.0% }
.r-middle       { width:  50%; height:  50%; border-width: 15px; top: 25.0%; left: 25.0% }
.r-center       { width:  25%; height:  25%; border-width: 20px; top: 37.5%; left: 37.5% }

.ring           { position: absolute;
                  border-color : hsl(205, 69%, 58%);
                  border-style : solid;
                  border-radius: 50%;
                  transition: all 50ms }

.ring:hover     { transform: scale(1.10) }
.ring:active    { transform: scale(0.95) }


/* demo extras, shadow and color manipulation during hover */
[btn]           { box-shadow: inset    0    0    1px hsla(205, 69%,48%, 1),  /* hide white overflow (quirk) */
                              inset   10px 10px 10px hsla(205, 69%, 8%,.3),  /* inset shadow */
                                       0    0    1px hsla(205, 69%,58%, 1),  /* hide white overflow (ditto) */
                                      20px 20px 10px hsla(205, 69%, 8%,.4),  /* inner outside shadow */
                                       0    0    1px hsla(205, 69%, 8%,.3) } /* outer outside shadow */

[btn]:hover     { border-color: hsl(205, 69%, 62%);
                  box-shadow: inset 10px 10px 10px hsla(205, 69%, 8%,.4),
                                    20px 20px 10px hsla(205, 69%, 8%,.3) }

[btn]:active    { border-color: hsl(205, 69%, 54%);
                  box-shadow: inset  8px  8px  8px hsla(205, 69%, 8%,.5),
                                    10px 10px 10px hsla(205, 69%, 8%,.4) }
    <div id="donut-1" class="donut-button">
        <div class="ring r-outer"></div>
        <div class="ring r-middle"></div>
        <div class="ring r-center"></div>
    </div>

    <div id="donut-2" class="donut-button">
        <div btn class="ring r-outer"></div>
        <div btn class="ring r-middle"></div>
        <div btn class="ring r-center"></div>
    </div>

| improve this answer | |
  • Very impressing Rene. But what about polygons or even images that cannot be drawn using CSS? – WhatisSober Nov 12 '15 at 7:26
  • You really are pushing me to even dive in deeper? Oy.... But I think in that case you can always fallback to stacking several images with transparent background. But, why don't you add a few links to complicated images so we (I) can have a look? – Rene van der Lende Nov 12 '15 at 13:15
  • This is the answer I would have provided, except I would have figured out some what of adding the long shadow (probably pseudo element with overflow:hidden; on the parent). – Donnie D'Amato Nov 15 '15 at 8:56
  • @fauxserious do show me! Create a pen or something and post the link. – Rene van der Lende Nov 15 '15 at 15:55
  • @fauxserious, I will digg into this and come up with another nice solution later on. tnx for the example (and challenge!) – Rene van der Lende Nov 15 '15 at 18:23
6

With JavaScript, you can hard-code the hovering areas as follows:

JavaScript

function animateCircles(obj) {
    var x = window.event.x - obj.offsetLeft;
    var y = window.event.y - obj.offsetTop;
    var img1 = document.getElementById('1');
    var img2 = document.getElementById('2');
    var img3 = document.getElementById('3');

    var centerR = 45;
    var middleR = 75;
    if (x >= img3.offsetLeft + (img3.offsetWidth / 2 - centerR) && 
        x <= img3.offsetLeft + (img3.offsetWidth / 2 + centerR) && 
        y >= img3.offsetTop + (img3.offsetHeight / 2 - centerR) && 
        y <= img3.offsetTop + (img3.offsetHeight / 2 + centerR))
        img3.className += " onhover";
    else
        img3.className = "normal";
        
    if (x >= img2.offsetLeft + (img2.offsetWidth / 2 - middleR) && 
        x <= img2.offsetLeft + (img2.offsetWidth / 2 + middleR) && 
        y >= img2.offsetTop + (img2.offsetHeight / 2 - middleR) && 
        y <= img2.offsetTop + (img2.offsetHeight / 2 + middleR))
        img2.className += " onhover";
    else
        img2.className = "normal";
    
    if (x >= img1.offsetLeft && 
        x <= img1.offsetLeft + img1.offsetWidth && 
        y >= img1.offsetTop && 
        y <= img1.offsetTop + img1.offsetHeight)
        img1.className += " onhover";
    else
        img1.className = "normal";
}

Where you specify the size of the hover 'squares' (center of the images from which the hovering should take place) with the variables centerR and middleR. Note that you can also improve this code to enlarge the hovering area as the images grow as well, such that the images only shrink when you hover outside of the enlarged image. Note that I've soft-coded all the widths and heights of the images on purpose: this allows for greater flexibility if you ever decide to change the pictures.

With the following HTML:

<div style="position: relative; left: 0; top: 0;">
    <img id="1" src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/bFfbC.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" onmousemove="animateCircles(this)" />
    <img id="2" src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/Eewcq.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" onmousemove="animateCircles(this)" />
    <img id="3" src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/VXk7A.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" onmousemove="animateCircles(this)" />
</div>

and CSS:

.normal {
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease;
    -moz-transition: all 1s ease;
    -ms-transition: all 1s ease;
    -o-transition: all 1s ease;
    transition: all 1s ease;
}
.onhover {
    -webkit-transform:scale(1.25);
    -moz-transform:scale(1.25);
    -ms-transform:scale(1.25);
    -o-transform:scale(1.25);
    transform:scale(1.25);
}

This yields the following result:

demo

> DEMO

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Might be that I interpreted the question wrong, but this solution guarantees that as the cursor moves inwards, the outer images retain the hover animation. The other solutions seem to have interpreted the question differently (e.g. animating the images seperately). – Jean-Paul Nov 8 '15 at 20:08
  • 2
    Note: individual animations can be constructed very quickly from my provided solution too. Simply add some extra add class and remove class lines to the if statements. – Jean-Paul Nov 8 '15 at 21:18
4

Try Pixel Selection: a JQuery library that can handle transparency in hovering.

$(function() {
  $('img').Pixelselect({
    over: function(e, obj, hit) {
      if (hit) {
        obj.addClass('hover');
      } else {
        obj.removeClass('hover');
      }
      e.preventDefault();
    },
    out: function(e, obj) {
      obj.removeClass('hover');
      e.preventDefault();
    },
    sublayers: true
  })
})
img {
  -webkit-transition: all 1s ease;
  /* Safari and Chrome */
  -moz-transition: all 1s ease;
  /* Firefox */
  -ms-transition: all 1s ease;
  /* IE 9 */
  -o-transition: all 1s ease;
  /* Opera */
  transition: all 1s ease;
  opacity: 1;
}
img.hover {
  opacity: 0.5;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div style="position: relative; left: 0; top: 0;">
  <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/80Jxj.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" />
  <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/Eewcq.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" />
  <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/VXk7A.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" />
</div>

(This won't work create with scaling the image, as the hover area will change, also the images need to be on the same domain)

| improve this answer | |
  • That is jQuery, not plain JavaScript – Jean-Paul Nov 8 '15 at 20:04
  • @Jean-Paul, but it has a clean syntax, and might be ok for what the op wants. – Ben Aubin Nov 8 '15 at 20:05
  • Sure, but OP didn't include the jQuery tag (which might be on purpose) – Jean-Paul Nov 8 '15 at 20:06
  • 1
    @Jean-Paul sure, but it might help someone else – Ben Aubin Nov 8 '15 at 20:07
  • @penne12 Can you write a jsfidddle? I couldn't get it to work jsfiddle.net/63rec2qv/view – WhatisSober Nov 8 '15 at 20:16
3

Demo
I have used z-index for three div's and each div has background-image

  • /*Largest Circle*/ Div1=z-index:1
  • /*second Circle*/ Div1=z-index:2
  • /*Middle Small Circle*/ Div1=z-index:3

    Stack

z-index is basically is used to stack it so Middle Circle is at top,second circle is in between Largest Circle and Middle Small Circle, Largest Circle is at last this does not influence mouse hover on other circle, since all circle is larger then circle above from it(in z-index) so they are visible and hoverable. Div id allImg is used to set align, size since all children div to allImg have width,height in percentage they will automatically resize

/*Outer Div use for alignment and to set size*/
		#allImg{
			width: 200px;
			height: 200px;
			margin: 0 auto;
			position: relative;
			 top:100px;
		}
		/*Styling appling to all desendant div inside allImg*/
		#allImg > div{
			position:absolute;
			padding: 0px;
			-webkit-transition: all 1s ease;/* Safari and Chrome */
		    -moz-transition: all 1s ease;/* Firefox */
		    -o-transition: all 1s ease; /* IE 9 */
		    -ms-transition: all 1s ease;/* Opera */
		    transition: all 1s ease;
		    position: absolute;
			padding: 0px;
			transition: all 1s ease 0s;
			border: 1px solid #000;
			border-radius: 100px;
		}
		/*Div with smallest z-index i.e outer circle*/
		#img1{
			background-image: url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/GWShR.png');
			background-size: 100% 100%;
			width: 100%;
			height: 100%; 
			z-index: 1;

		}

		#img1:hover{
			-moz-transform: scale(1.25);/* Firefox */
			-webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
		    -ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
		    -o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
		     transform:scale(1.25);
		}
		/*Div with greater z-index  then Outer circle i.e 2nd circle*/
		#img2{
			background-image: url("http://i.stack.imgur.com/eWisy.png");
			background-size: 100% 100%;
			width: 50%;
			height: 50%;
			left: 25%;
			top: 25%;
			z-index:2;

		}
		#img2:hover{
			-moz-transform: scale(1.16);/* Firefox */
			-webkit-transform:scale(1.16); /* Safari and Chrome */
		    -ms-transform:scale(1.16); /* IE 9 */
		    -o-transform:scale(1.16); /* Opera */
		     transform:scale(1.16);
		}
		/*Div with greatest z-index i.e middle circle*/
		#img3{
			background-image: url("http://i.stack.imgur.com/VjygS.png");
			background-size: 100% 100%;
			width: 30%;
			height: 30%;
			left: 35%;
			top: 35%;
			z-index:3;
		}
		#img3:hover{
			-moz-transform: scale(1.13);/* Firefox */
			-webkit-transform:scale(1.13); /* Safari and Chrome */
		    -ms-transform:scale(1.13); /* IE 9 */
		    -o-transform:scale(1.13); /* Opera */
		     transform:scale(1.13);
		}
<div id="allImg">
  <div id="img1"></div>
  <div id="img2"></div>
  <div id="img3"></div>
</div>

Also Note that you need to Crop image it to actual size as said by @Dave Gomez

| improve this answer | |
1

I think you need => JSFiddle demo :)

    div:hover > img {
    -webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transform:scale(1.25); /* Firefox */
    -ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
    -o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
     transform:scale(1.25);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    "the hover effect gets applied to the whole image not just the image part " – Morpheus Nov 4 '15 at 8:07
  • I would also suggest to add -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden; to prevent the jagged edges shown on chrome :) – rpirsc13 Nov 8 '15 at 19:05
1

One solution possible could be :
(using The HTML map element)

var vi = function(el) {
  
  var imgEl  = document.getElementById(el.getAttribute('data-img'));
  if(imgEl) imgEl.classList.add('effectOn');
}

var vo = function(el) {
  
  var imgEl  = document.getElementById(el.getAttribute('data-img'));
  if(imgEl) imgEl.classList.remove('effectOn');
  

}
img {
    -webkit-transition: all 1s ease; /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transition: all 1s ease; /* Firefox */
    -ms-transition: all 1s ease; /* IE 9 */
    -o-transition: all 1s ease; /* Opera */
    transition: all 1s ease;
}

img.effectOn {
    -webkit-transform:scale(1.25); /* Safari and Chrome */
    -moz-transform:scale(1.25); /* Firefox */
    -ms-transform:scale(1.25); /* IE 9 */
    -o-transform:scale(1.25); /* Opera */
     transform:scale(1.25);
}
<div style="position: relative; left: 0; top: 0;">
  
  <img id='main' src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/80Jxj.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" usemap='#main' />
  <img id='middle' src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/Eewcq.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" usemap='#main'/>
  <img id='center' src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/VXk7A.png" style="position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0;" usemap='#main'/>

  <map id="main">

    <area shape="circle" onmouseover='vi(this)' onmouseout='vo(this)' data-img='center' coords="147,147,58" />
    <area shape="circle" onmouseover='vi(this)' onmouseout='vo(this)' data-img='middle' coords="147,147,90" />
    <area shape="circle" onmouseover='vi(this)' onmouseout='vo(this)' data-img='main' coords="147,147,147" />

  </map>

</div>


You can use this way on any kind of forms, rect, triangle, poly ...
The most difficult is to delimit the map, but there is various software that can help you with that (GIMP do that).

| improve this answer | |
  • Its not doing anything on hover. Also how do you calculate coordinates? Can it be done via GIMP? – WhatisSober Nov 16 '15 at 21:48
  • I have used the working snippet above with Firefox 42 ! For the coords you can read this and yes you can use GIMP. – Anonymous0day Nov 19 '15 at 14:12
0

As said in the comment just one image and the other 2 only with html/css. Here the fiddle, hope the effect you need is this :)

https://jsfiddle.net/keypaul/8dr25184/

HTML

<div id="wrap">
    <div></div>
    <div></div>
    <img src="http://i.stack.imgur.com/bFfbC.png" alt="" />
</div>

CSS

    #wrap {
    position:relative;
    width:280px;
    height:280px;
}

#wrap img{
    position:relative;
    max-width:100%;
    height:auto;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    z-index:1;
    transform: scale(1);
    transition: 0.4s;
}

#wrap img:hover {
     transform:scale(1.25);
}

#wrap div:nth-child(1){
    background: transparent;
    border: 15px solid red;
    border-radius: 100px;
    height: 99px;
    left: 75px;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: absolute;
    top: 77px;
    width: 99px;
    z-index: 2;
    transform: scale(1);
    transition: 0.4s;
}

#wrap div:hover:nth-child(1){
    transform: scale(1.5);
}

#wrap div:nth-child(2){
    background: transparent;
    border: 20px solid red;
    border-radius: 40px;
    height: 34px;
    left: 103px;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: absolute;
    top: 105px;
    width: 34px;
    z-index: 3;
    transform: scale(1);
    transition: 0.4s;
}

#wrap div:hover:nth-child(2){
    transform: scale(1.5);
}

You need only to delete inner little circle from the big png, change color of internal donuts and add vendor prefix in the css.

| improve this answer | |
  • I do not want to use CSS to draw shapes. The question is to have hover effect on irregular images (images with transparent background). – WhatisSober Nov 8 '15 at 20:26
  • 1
    Sorry i've seen now also the effect you need. – keypaul Nov 8 '15 at 21:01

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