7

I have the following code that attempts to catch a null reference. It then throws an exception with a clearer reason for the error specified in the message property.

What type of exception should it throw? An IndexOutOfRangeException?

var existing = this.GetByItemId(entity.ItemId); // int or long
if (existing == null)
{
    throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("The specified item does not exist.");
}

var price = existing.Price;

or a NullReferenceException?

var existing = this.GetByItemId(entity.ItemId);
if (existing == null)
{
    throw new NullReferenceException("The specified item does not exist.");
}

var price = existing.Price;

or, should we have just let the exception run its course?

var existing = this.GetByItemId(entity.ItemId);
var price = existing.Price; // NullReferenceException coming your way

The reason we tend not to do this last option, is that the default NullReferenceException is light on detail and just states

Object reference not set to an instance of an object.

Which, to be honest, could quite well be the most unhelpful error message in C#.

  • 2
    From your code, IndexOutOfRangeException does't seem to fit: I expect such exception when accessing an indexable structure (array, list) with in integer index, and the index used is out of range. your GetItemById(int itemID) seems to use an id of something for a lookup, not an integer as index – Gian Paolo Nov 4 '15 at 11:32
  • is the existing null or is theexisting.Price null, quite different things that would be. Your examples indicate it both ways however. – Mark Schultheiss Nov 4 '15 at 11:33
  • If you lack details in the null reference exception, perhaps you'll want to inherit it and create your own exception with the properties you need? Or just any old custom exception with some informative description, that's probably what I'd do... – Culme Nov 4 '15 at 11:34
  • In these case, I usually go with a custom mySpecializedException (if I want the caller to be able to handle it in ad hoc way), or a generic ApplicationException("The specified item does not exist."); if the only thing I do with that exception is log and tell the user "sorry, something went wrong" – Gian Paolo Nov 4 '15 at 11:36
  • @MarkSchultheiss the existing object is null. – Rebecca Nov 4 '15 at 11:37
9

I would use a custom exception for this (some thing like ItemNotFoundException).

A NullReferenceExceptionor IndexOutOfRangeException might be thrown by something else inside of this.GetByItemId() or in the Framework somewhere.

The caller might wish to perform a follow up action if the item does not appear in the collection (e.g. adding it). Using your own exception allows the caller to catch that exception specifically and react accordingly.

  • I have taken your advice. We now have a ItemNotFoundException. – Rebecca Nov 4 '15 at 15:18
5

A custom exception with the description of your choice should do it:

 if (existing == null)
    {
        throw new EntityMissingException("'existing' does not exist (ironic, isn't it?).");
    }
  • 2
    Never throw the base class of all Exceptions. This makes it impossible to write focused catch blocks. – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 4 '15 at 11:46
  • 1
    I am honestly interested in why this is downvoted =) The OP argues that the NullReferenceException is "light on detail". Using a custom error text can provide lots ant lots of detail, if required. Agreed, it has drawbacks when it comes to handling etc, but is it really that bad? I tend to do this a lot, so I'll truly appreciate pointers as to why it is bad, I'm not just ranting because I got downvoted! =) – Culme Nov 4 '15 at 11:51
  • 2
    I already explained it in my comment above. The problem is not the custom error message - which is great! - but that you are throwing an instance of Exception. This rule is derived from another rule: Never catch Exception. Instead, catch a more specific exception class. See here for an explanation. Now, when you throw Exception - instead of a more specific exception class - you force the user of your code to write a catch block that violates the rule to never catch the base class Exception. – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 4 '15 at 11:54
  • 1
    @Daniel: Your comment wasn't visible when I wrote mine. Thanks for further details and links! – Culme Nov 4 '15 at 11:58
  • 1
    You are welcome. It's good to ask for clarification, when you don't understand the reason for a downvote. Just like now it can help change your answer into a great one and you might just learn something new :) – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 4 '15 at 12:00
1

The NullReferenceException indicates that you want to access a member of a null reference. Normally you should never throw it (unless if you implement an interpreter or something similar).

If the entity is a parameter, then I would say this is an ArgumentException. If you say that this should never happen in normal circumstances, then this is rather an InvalidOperationException.

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