19

I am trying to loop through the below JSON file in PowerShell.

Without specifically naming the top tags (e.g. 17443 and 17444), as I do not know them in advance I cannot find a way to loop through the data.

I want to output tags 3, 4 and 5 (title, firstname, surname) for all the records.

How would I accomplish that?

{
   "17443":{
      "sid":"17443",
      "nid":"7728",
      "submitted":"1436175407",
      "data":{
         "3":{
            "value":[
               "Mr"
            ]
         },
         "4":{
            "value":[
               "Jack"
            ]
         },
         "5":{
            "value":[
               "Cawles"
            ]
         }
      },
      "17444":{
         "sid":"17444",
         "nid":"7728",
         "submitted":"1436891400",
         "data":{
            "3":{
               "value":[
                  "Miss"
               ]
            },
            "4":{
               "value":[
                  "Charlotte"
               ]
            },
            "5":{
               "value":[
                  "Tann"
               ]
            }
         }
      },
      "17445":{
         "sid":"17445",
         "nid":"7728",
         "submitted":"1437142325",
         "data":{
            "3":{
               "value":[
                  "Mr"
               ]
            },
            "4":{
               "value":[
                  "John"
               ]
            },
            "5":{
               "value":[
                  "Brokland"
               ]
            }
         }
      }
   }
}

I can access the data with the code below, but I want to avoid putting in 17443, 17444, etc.

$data = ConvertFrom-Json $json

foreach ($i in $data.17443)
{
   foreach ($t in $i.data.3)
   {
      Write-Host $t.value
   }
   foreach ($t in $i.data.4)
   {
      Write-Host $t.value
   }
   foreach ($t in $i.data.5)
   {
      Write-Host $t.value
   }
}
  • 2
    Have you tried anything yourself or are you waiting that someone implements this for you? – Tomalak Nov 4 '15 at 11:38
  • Yes, I can get to the data by specifically adding the top tags, e.g foreach ($i in $data.17443) { foreach ($t in $i.data.3) { write-host $t.value } foreach ($t in $i.data.4) { write-host $t.value } foreach ($t in $i.data.5) { write-host $t.value } } – Omen9876 Nov 4 '15 at 11:50
  • I've edited my question with this, so it is more helpful – Omen9876 Nov 4 '15 at 11:57
  • That's a lot better. :) You should generally include the code that you have been working with, this gives others the chance to evaluate your approach and to work with something tangible. – Tomalak Nov 4 '15 at 12:01
30

PowerShell 3.0+

In PowerShell 3.0 and higher (see: Determine installed PowerShell version) you can use the ConvertFrom-Json cmdlet to convert a JSON string into a PowerShell data structure.

That's convenient and unfortunate at the same time - convenient, because it's very easy to consume JSON, unfortunate because ConvertFrom-Json gives you PSCustomObjects, and they are hard to iterate over as key-value pairs.

In this particular JSON, the keys seem to be dynamic/not known ahead of time, like "17443" or "17444". That means we need something that can turn a PSCustomObject into a key-value list that foreach can understand.

# helper to turn PSCustomObject into a list of key/value pairs
function Get-ObjectMembers {
    [CmdletBinding()]
    Param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$True, ValueFromPipeline=$True)]
        [PSCustomObject]$obj
    )
    $obj | Get-Member -MemberType NoteProperty | ForEach-Object {
        $key = $_.Name
        [PSCustomObject]@{Key = $key; Value = $obj."$key"}
    }
}

Now we can traverse the object graph and produce a list of output objects with Title, FirstName and LastName

$json = '{"17443": {"17444": {"sid": "17444","nid": "7728","submitted": "1436891400","data": {"3": {"value": ["Miss"]},"4": {"value": ["Charlotte"]},"5": {"value": ["Tann"]}}},"17445": {"sid": "17445","nid": "7728","submitted": "1437142325","data": {"3": {"value": ["Mr"]},"4": {"value": ["John"]},"5": {"value": ["Brokland"]}}},"sid": "17443","nid": "7728","submitted": "1436175407","data": {"3": {"value": ["Mr"]},"4": {"value": ["Jack"]},"5": {"value": ["Cawles"]}}}}'

$json | ConvertFrom-Json | Get-ObjectMembers | foreach {
    $_.Value | Get-ObjectMembers | where Key -match "^\d+$" | foreach {
        [PSCustomObject]@{
            Title = $_.value.data."3".value | select -First 1
            FirstName = $_.Value.data."4".value | select -First 1
            LastName = $_.Value.data."5".value | select -First 1
        }
    }
}

Output

Title                      FirstName                  LastName                 
-----                      ---------                  --------                 
Miss                       Charlotte                  Tann                     
Mr                         John                       Brokland                 

PowerShell 2.0 / Alternative approach

An alternative approach that also works for PowerShell 2.0 (which does not support some of the constructs above) would involve using the .NET JavaScriptSerializer class to handle the JSON:

Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Web.Extensions
$JS = New-Object System.Web.Script.Serialization.JavaScriptSerializer

Now we can do a very similar operation—even a bit simpler than above, because JavaScriptSerializer gives you regular Dictionaries, which are easy to iterate over as key-value pairs via the GetEnumerator() method:

$json = '{"17443": {"17444": {"sid": "17444","nid": "7728","submitted": "1436891400","data": {"3": {"value": ["Miss"]},"4": {"value": ["Charlotte"]},"5": {"value": ["Tann"]}}},"17445": {"sid": "17445","nid": "7728","submitted": "1437142325","data": {"3": {"value": ["Mr"]},"4": {"value": ["John"]},"5": {"value": ["Brokland"]}}},"sid": "17443","nid": "7728","submitted": "1436175407","data": {"3": {"value": ["Mr"]},"4": {"value": ["Jack"]},"5": {"value": ["Cawles"]}}}}'

$data = $JS.DeserializeObject($json)

$data.GetEnumerator() | foreach {
    $_.Value.GetEnumerator() | where { $_.Key -match "^\d+$" } | foreach {
        New-Object PSObject -Property @{
            Title = $_.Value.data."3".value | select -First 1
            FirstName = $_.Value.data."4".value | select -First 1
            LastName = $_.Value.data."5".value | select -First 1
        }
    }
}

The output is the same:

Title                      FirstName                  LastName                 
-----                      ---------                  --------                 
Miss                       Charlotte                  Tann                     
Mr                         John                       Brokland                 

If you have JSON larger than 4 MB, set the JavaScriptSerializer.MaxJsonLength property accordingly.


On reading JSON from files

If you read from a file, use Get-Content -Raw -Encoding UTF-8.

  • -Raw because otherwise Get-Content returns an array of individual lines and JavaScriptSerializer.DeserializeObject can't handle that. Recent Powershell versions seem to have improved type-conversion for .NET function arguments, so it might not error out on your system, but if it does (or just to be safe), use -Raw.
  • -Encoding because it's wise to specify a text file's encoding when you read it and UTF-8 is the most probable value for JSON files.

Notes

  • ConvertFrom-Json() gives you a PowerShell custom object (PSCustomObject) that reflects the data in the JSON string.
  • You can loop though the properties of a custom object with Get-Member -type NoteProperty
  • You can access the properties of an object dynamically using the $object."$propName" syntax, alternatively $object."$(some PS expression)".
  • You can create your own custom object and initialize it with a bunch of properties with New-Object PSObject -Property @{...}, alternatively [PSCustomObject]@{ .. } `
  • thank you, that is what I need – Omen9876 Nov 4 '15 at 12:51
-11

Here's a simple regex-based solution. Assuming that $sRawJson contains your JSON input:

$oRegex = [Regex]'(?:(?<="[345]":\{"value"\:\["))[^"]+'
$cParts = $oRegex.Matches(($sRawJson -replace '\s')) | Select-Object -ExpandProperty "Value"

Joining parts to get full names:

for ($i = 0; $i -lt $cParts.Count / 3; $i++) { $cParts[($i * 3)..($i * 3 + 2)] -join ' ' }
  • 5
    You never ever want to touch JSON with regular expressions. – Tomalak Nov 4 '15 at 12:17
  • 1
    According to you maybe. Also downwoting an answer that outputs precisely what what asked is just plain disruptive. – Alexander Obersht Nov 4 '15 at 12:17
  • 5
    I downvote answers that do unhelpful and unwise things. Whether they by chance output the right thing is entirely besides the point. I also downvote answers that suggest XML or HTML could be parsed with regular expressions, which they can't - for exactly the same reason that JSON can't be parsed with regular expressions. – Tomalak Nov 4 '15 at 12:27
  • 3
    That is not an "entitled to my opinion" thing. There are very specific technical reasons why regular expressions are unsuitable and inappropriate for this kind of task. – Tomalak Nov 4 '15 at 12:33
  • 5
    And there goes your chance to learn something. Too bad. – Tomalak Nov 4 '15 at 12:45

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