42

I've been working on a C# application and wanted to try it out the GitLab CI. All I can see is Ruby and can't find any information on how to build a C# application using it.

When I run the test settings, I make the commit, but I don't have my build.

Enter image description here

How should I make a simple build? Which command could I use for that? I don't mind if I get a failed build (but a build).

  • 3
    Do you have a .gitlab-ci.yml file that you can share? – danielcooperxyz Nov 24 '15 at 12:59
39

I just wanted to share my .gitlab-ci.yml complete with unit testing. You will have to adjust your nuget and possibly other paths. This is for a single project in a solution of the same name.

variables:
  PROJECT_NAME: "ProjectNameGoesHere"
before_script:
  - echo "starting build for %PROJECT_NAME%"
  - echo "Restoring NuGet Packages..."
  - d:\tools\nuget restore "%PROJECT_NAME%.sln"
stages:
  - build
  - test
build:
  stage: build
  script:
  - echo "Release build..."
  - '"C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\msbuild.exe" /consoleloggerparameters:ErrorsOnly /maxcpucount /nologo /property:Configuration=Release /verbosity:quiet "%PROJECT_NAME%.sln"'
  artifacts:
    untracked: true
test:
  stage: test
  script:
  - echo "starting tests"
  - cd %PROJECT_NAME%Tests/bin/Release
  - '"C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 14.0\Common7\IDE\MSTest.exe" /testcontainer:%PROJECT_NAME%Tests.dll'
  dependencies:
  - build
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  • 3
    For those reading this comment, you have FIRST to configure your machine to be the runner. Follow the guide of Prasanth Louis below, and especially the link gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab-ci-multi-runner/blob/master/docs/… (because there were updates). Only then you can use this .gitlab-ci.yml. – corentinaltepe Dec 2 '16 at 6:31
  • 1
    @corentin Thank you for including this. Yes and you will need visual studio installed on your build machine as I believe MSTest is part of it. – Jeff Dec 6 '16 at 19:07
  • 2
    Please consider submitting your example to the GitLab CI Yml project. – bbodenmiller Jan 27 '17 at 19:21
  • my project build successfully but removes all untracked files, including needed bin/ folders for testing.. something strange with artifacts: untracked: true? – fiorebat Sep 3 '18 at 15:43
  • 1
    @fiorebat If they are not tracked by git they should be added as per docs.gitlab.com/ee/ci/yaml/#artifacts-untracked If you are checking in dll files to git then you will have to tweak this or ask yourself why you are not pulling them from nugget. – Jeff Sep 4 '18 at 15:34
20

In order to build a C# application you should have a Windows runner (with shell executor) configured for a project in GitLab CI.

Your .gitlab-ci.yml file should look something like that:

stages:
  - build

job:
  stage: build
  script:
  - echo "Restoring NuGet Packages..."
  - '"c:\nuget\nuget.exe" restore "MySolution.sln"'
  - ''
  - echo "Release build..."
  - C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\msbuild.exe /consoleloggerparameters:ErrorsOnly /maxcpucount /nologo /property:Configuration=Release /verbosity:quiet "MySolution.sln"
  tags:
  except:
  - tags

On a Windows machine you need the following tools:

  • Runner installed
  • Git, added to PATH
  • Latest nuget.exe at C:\nuget (or somewhere else. Just make sure you got the path right in the .gitlab-ci.yml file)
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  • I'm sorry, what do you mean with 'git, added to PATH'? – E. van der Spoel Dec 1 '15 at 13:30
  • 1
    Got it, it's for Windows to know where git is located so the git can be executed as shell. – E. van der Spoel Dec 1 '15 at 14:04
  • 2
    Your path to msbuild doesn't work if there is a space in it. – Jeremy Dec 8 '15 at 19:47
  • @grisha On gitlab.com there's not a shared windows runner available. The shared runner on gitlab.com has Docker, but Docker doesn't support (yet) windows containers.* Do you know of plans of Gitlab supporting a windows shared runner? *) Yes, Docker does support windows containers in a weird way, but only if Docker client runs on a windows machine, which to a certain extent defies the purpose. – gijswijs May 29 '16 at 18:52
  • @gijswijs There is installation instructions for windows available here. There are links to x86 and amd64 runners. Hope it helps. – Grisha Jun 14 '16 at 6:43
10

The other answers are good. But I'd like to explain how to install a runner in addition. I use my own local system (Windows), so I chose to run shell. But you could use a Docker image if you'd like.

cd C:\Multi-Runner
gitlab-ci-multi-runner register

Please enter the gitlab-ci coordinator URL (e.g. https://gitlab.com )
https://gitlab.com
Please enter the gitlab-ci token for this runner
xxx
Please enter the gitlab-ci description for this runner
my-runner
INFO[0034] fcf5c619 Registering runner... succeeded
Please enter the executor: shell, docker, docker-ssh, ssh?
shell
INFO[0037] Runner registered successfully. Feel free to start it, but if it's
running already the config should be automatically reloaded!

Source: https://gitlab.com/gitlab-org/gitlab-ci-multi-runner/blob/master/docs/install/windows.md

Afterwards, you can use a YAML file a like this:

stages:
    - build
job:
    stage: build
    script: '"C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\msbuild.exe" "something.sln"'
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8

Installing the build runner on a Windows machine helps a lot, and @prasanth-louis has a great example on how to do that.

As for the .gitlab-ci.yml file, you can simplify it even more by using Cake Build:

stages:
    - build
build:
    stage: build
    script:
        - .\build.ps1 -Target Build
    tags:
        - windows

And your build.cake file can look like this (based of the example repository):

#tool nuget:?package=NUnit.ConsoleRunner&version=3.4.0

var target = Argument("target", "Default");
var configuration = Argument("configuration", "Release");

var solution = "./example-project.sln";
var buildDir = Directory("./example-project/bin");

Task("Default")
    .IsDependentOn("Unit-Tests")
    .Does(() =>
{
    Information("Running Default task!");
});

Task("Clean")
    .Does(() =>
{
    CleanDirectory(buildDir);
});

Task("PackageRestore")
    .IsDependentOn("Clean")
    .Does(() =>
{
    Information("Restoring NuGet packages for {0}", solution);
    NuGetRestore(solution);
});

Task("Build")
    .IsDependentOn("PackageRestore")
    .Does(() =>
{
    Information("Restoring NuGet packages for {0}", solution);
    MSBuild(solution, settings => settings.SetConfiguration(configuration));
});

Task("Unit-Tests")
    .IsDependentOn("Build")
    .Does(() =>
{
    NUnit3("./example-project.Tests/**/bin/" + configuration + "/*.Tests.dll");
});

Task("Publish")
    .Does(() =>
{

});

RunTarget(target);
|improve this answer|||||
  • Cake is definitely the way to go especially if you are transitioning from TeamCity, Jenkins, etc. server that handled a lot of this stuff for you. – David Archer Jan 19 '18 at 0:13
2

Here my working .gitlab-ci.yml file for c# application with NUnit as unit test framework and mono as basic image.

Not very fancy but working:

image: mono:latest

stages:
    - build
    - test

variables:
    solution: "Project.sln"
    test: "Project.Test"

before_script:
    - nuget restore

build:
    stage: build
    script:
        - msbuild /p:Configuration=Release $solution

test:
    stage: test
    script:
        - msbuild /p:Configuration=Release $solution
        - mono ./packages/NUnit.ConsoleRunner.3.10.0/tools/nunit3-console.exe ./$test/bin/Release/$test.dll
|improve this answer|||||

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