3

I just read Eric Lippert's "Arrays considered somewhat harmful" article. He tells his readers that they "probably should not return an array as the value of a public method or property," with the following reasoning (slightly paraphrased):

Now the caller can take that array and replace the contents of it with whatever they please. The sensible thing to return is IList<>. You can build yourself a nice read-only collection object once, and then just pass out references to it as much as you want.

In essence,

An array is a collection of variables. The caller doesn’t want variables, but it’ll take them if that’s the only way to get the values. But neither the callee nor the caller wants those variables to ever vary.

In an attempt to understand what he meant by variables vs. values, I built demo class that has Array and IList<> fields, and methods that return references to both. Here it is on C# Pad.

class A {

    private readonly int[] arr = new []
    {
        10, 20, 30, 40, 50    
    };

    private readonly List<int> list = new List<int>(new []
    {
        10, 20, 30, 40, 50
    });

    public int[] GetArr()
    {
        return arr;
    }

    public IList<int> GetList()
    {
        return list;
    }
}

If I understand correctly, the GetArr() method is Lippert's bad practice, and GetList() is his sensible practice. Here is a demo of the bad caller mutability behavior of GetArr():

var a = new A();
var arr1 = a.GetArr();
var arr2 = a.GetArr();

Console.WriteLine("arr1[2]: " + arr1[2].ToString());  // > arr1[2]: 30
Console.WriteLine("arr2[2]: " + arr2[2].ToString());  // > arr2[2]: 30

// ONE CALLER MUTATES
arr1[2] = 99;

// BOTH CALLERS AFFECTED
Console.WriteLine("arr1[2]: " + arr1[2].ToString());  // > arr1[2]: 99
Console.WriteLine("arr2[2]: " + arr2[2].ToString());  // > arr2[2]: 99

But I don't understand his distinction - the IList<> reference has the same caller mutation problem:

var a = new A();
var list1 = a.GetList();
var list2 = a.GetList();

Console.WriteLine("list1[2]: " + list1[2].ToString());  // > list1[2]: 30
Console.WriteLine("list2[2]: " + list2[2].ToString());  // > list2[2]: 30

// ONE CALLER MUTATES
list1[2] = 99;

// BOTH CALLERS AFFECTED
Console.WriteLine("list1[2]: " + list1[2].ToString());  // > list1[2]: 99
Console.WriteLine("list2[2]: " + list2[2].ToString());  // > list2[2]: 99

Obviously, I trust that Eric Lippert knows what he's talking about, so where have I misinterpreted him? In what way is a returned IList<> reference safer than an Array reference?

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    I think what's missing here is following this advice: "You can build yourself a nice read-only collection object once, and then just pass out references to it as much as you want." Though, to be fair, it's reasonable nowadays to return an array, but type the return value as an IReadOnlyList<T>. – Dan Bryant Nov 4 '15 at 18:34
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    The most common reason to prefer an interface (iList in this case) is its adaptability (i.e., you can fullfil the given requirements in many different ways unlike with string[] for example, which only accepts a very specific format); and this is the point being made here. Nothing to do with arrays as such (but with its not so adaptable essence). IMHO (and by having very clear that Eric Lippert certainly knows much more about .NET languages than I do), this kind of generic statements are rarely good. Arrays are the ideal approach in certain situations and iLists (or even Lists) in others. – varocarbas Nov 4 '15 at 18:36
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    Your example seems to say that you have to return a List<T> for an IList<T>, but you can return the array as well, as arrays implement IList<T>; however, be careful, you cannot use the Add() method in this case. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 4 '15 at 18:40
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    @varocarbas No, it really is to do with arrays themselves. There is no possibility of making an array read-only. So if you return an array, you cannot prevent the caller from modifying that array. So if you return a list-like structure, and return it as an array, you cannot safely cache the array between for subsequent calls. That's the whole point of the blog post. Therefore, if caching the list is desirable or there is any real chance of it becoming so in the future, don't return arrays. I'm not denying there are exceptions, but if you have to ask if your case is one, it probably isn't. – user743382 Nov 4 '15 at 18:42
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    One minor tidbit, if you intend to pass back a read-only collection typed as an IList<T>, while technically this is correct (as we have the IList<T>.IsReadOnly flag), I think it's better to type it as a IReadOnlyList<T> instead (assuming you're using .NET 4.5 or higher). Reason being that IList<T> is generally consumed as a mutable collection and has a mutable API. A lot of times, people assume that if they have an IList<T> or List<T> they can change it. – Chris Sinclair Nov 4 '15 at 18:45
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Had that article been written today it would have almost certainly suggested using IReadOnlyList<T>, but that type didn't exist in 2008 when that article was written. The only supported means of having a read-only indexable list interface was to use an IList<T> and simply not implement the mutation operations. This does let you return an object that the caller can't mutate, although it's not necessarily clear (particularly from the API) that the object is in fact immutable. That drawback in .NET has been remedied since then.

  • There's a ton of good info in this thread, but this bit of history really clears it up. – kdbanman Nov 4 '15 at 18:58
3

Returning a List<T> object as an IList<T> is not what he is recommending. Instead, you should create a read-only object that implements IList<T> and return that. For example, you could use a ReadOnlyCollection<T> object.

  • "Returning a List<T> object as an IList<T> is not what he is recommending." I think you're right. I guess I was just thrown off because the IList<> interface expresses mutability. Everything would've been much clearer if he suggested returning an IReadOnlyList<> directly. – kdbanman Nov 4 '15 at 18:56
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    @kdbanman IReadOnlyList<> didn't exist yet at the time of the blog post. If he had written it today, I'm convinced IReadOnlyList<> would be used. :) – user743382 Nov 4 '15 at 18:57
  • @hvd, interesting! I think you're right. – kdbanman Nov 4 '15 at 18:58
2

He is referring to the ability to implement IList<T> with a read-only concrete type:

If you are writing such an API, wrap the array in a ReadOnlyCollection and return an IEnumerable or an IList or something, but not an array. (And of course, do not simply cast the array to IEnumerable and think you’re done! That is still passing out variables; the caller can simply cast back to array! Only pass out an array if it is wrapped up by a read-only object.)

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