26

This question already has an answer here:

I create a new branch like this:

git branch dev-itt-9

However, it only creates a new branch on local

git branch -a

* dev-itt-9
  master
  testing

  remotes/origin/HEAD -> origin/master
  remotes/origin/development
  remotes/origin/master
  remotes/origin/testing

What is the proper way to create a new branch on both local and remote?

I am quite new to git. Sorry if my question is stupid.

marked as duplicate by Chris Maes, Community Nov 5 '15 at 13:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Do some changes to your branch and commit and push to origin! – deepakb Nov 5 '15 at 13:44
  • git add ., git commit -m "your message", git push origin dev-itt-9 ! – deepakb Nov 5 '15 at 13:44
34

First, you create your branch locally:

git checkout -b your_branch

The remote branch is automatically created when you push it to the remote server. So when you feel ready for it, you can just do:

git push <remote-name> <branch-name>

Where <remote-name> is typically origin, the name which git gives to the remote you cloned from. Your colleagues would then just pull that branch, and it's automatically created locally.

  • can I use "remotes/origin" instead of just pure "origin"? What is the difference? – chipbk10 Nov 5 '15 at 13:52
  • remote name is origin. So basically as per your question you have to do : git push origin dev-itt-9. So it will create origin/dev-itt-9 on your remote. – deepakb Nov 5 '15 at 13:53
22

Suppose you already created your local branch (using git branch <branch-name> or git checkout -b <branch-name>, you can use:

git push -u origin <branch-name>

explications:

  • -u = --set-upstream : set this new remote branch as tracking branch.
  • origin : the name of your remote repository
  • <branch-name> in my case is dev-itt-9 right? So why not "git push -u remotes/origin dev-itt-9" ? – chipbk10 Nov 5 '15 at 13:49
  • not sure what side effect the "remotes/origin" would have. git push origin dev-itt-9 will do the trick for you; add -u if you want to track the (new) remote branch – Chris Maes Nov 5 '15 at 13:51

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