4

I have to write a bash script that launches a process in background in accordance to command line argument passed and returns if it were successfully able to run launch the program.

Here is a pseudo code of what I am trying to achieve

if [ "$1" = "PROG_1" ] ; then
    ./launchProg1 &
    if [ isLaunchSuccess ] ; then
        echo "Success"
    else
        echo "failed"
        exit 1
    fi
elif [ "$1" = "PROG_2" ] ; then
    ./launchProg2 &
    if [ isLaunchSuccess ] ; then
        echo "Success"
    else
        echo "failed"
        exit 1
    fi
fi

Script cannot wait or sleep since it will be called by another mission critical c++ program and needs high throughput ( wrt no of processes started per second ) and moreover running time of processes are unknown. Script neither needs to capture any input/output nor waits for launched process' completion.

I have unsuccessfully tried the following:

#Method 1
if [ "$1" = "KP1" ] ; then
    echo "The Arguement is KP1"
    ./kp 'this is text' &
    if [ $? = "0" ] ; then
        echo "Success"
    else
        echo "failed"
        exit 1
    fi
elif [ "$1" = "KP2" ] ; then
    echo "The Arguement is KP2"
    ./NoSuchCommand 'this is text' &
    if [ $? = "0" ] ; then
        echo "Success"
    else
        echo "failed"
        exit 1
    fi
#Method 2
elif [ "$1" = "CD5" ] ; then
    echo "The Arguement is CD5"
    cd "doesNotExist" &
    PROC_ID=$!
    echo "PID is $PROC_ID"
    if kill -0 "$PROC_ID" ; then
        echo "Success"
    else
        echo "failed"
        exit 1
    fi
#Method 3
elif [ "$1" = "CD6" ] ; then
    echo "The Arguement is CD6"
    cd .. &
    PROC_ID=$!
    echo "PID is $PROC_ID"
    ps -eo pid | grep "$PROC_ID" && { echo "Success"; exit 0; }
    ps -eo pid | grep  "$PROC_ID" || { echo "failed" ; exit 1; }
else
    echo "Unknown Argument"
    exit 1
fi

Running the script gives unreliable output. Method 1, 2 always return Success while Method 3 returns failed when process execution finishes before the checks.

Here is sample tested on GNU bash, version 4.1.2(1)-release (x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu) and GNU bash, version 4.3.11(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu)

[scripts]$ ./processStarted3.sh KP1
The Arguement is KP1
Success
[scripts]$ ./processStarted3.sh KP2
The Arguement is KP2
Success
./processStarted3.sh: line 13: ./NoSuchCommand: No such file or directory
[scripts]$ ./processStarted3.sh CD6
The Arguement is CD6
PID is 25050
failed

As suggested in similar questions, I cannot use process names as one process may be executed several times and others can't be applied.

I have not tried screen and tmux, since getting permission to install them on production servers wont be easy ( but will do so if that is the only option left )

UPDATE
@ghoti
./kp is program which exists and launching the program returns Success. ./NoSuchCommand does not exist. Still as you can see from (edited) output, script incorrectly returns Success.

It does not matter when the process completes execution or program abnormally terminates. Programs launched via script are not tracked in any way ( hence we do not store pid in any table nor necessity arises to use deamontools ).

@Etan Reisner
Example of a program which fails to launch will be ./NoSuchCommand,which does not exist. Or maybe a corrupted program which fails to start.

@Vorsprung
Calling a script which launches a program in background does not take alot of time ( and is manageable as per our expectations). But sleep 1 will accumulate over time to cause issues.

Aforementioned #Method3 works fine barring processes which terminate before ps -eo pid | grep "$PROC_ID" && { echo "Success"; exit 0; } check can be performed.

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  • 1
    Do you need to test that they are still running or that they ran correctly at all? How can you tell if they ran correctly if they are still running? Does later failure not matter? Do you care if they fail at some point if they started running? What specific criteria do you need to report on? – Etan Reisner Nov 5 '15 at 15:14
  • script will return if the process launched successfully or not. There is no need to check if they are still running or later terminated abnormally. – parthasarathy Nov 5 '15 at 15:20
  • Under what conditions do these programs fail to launch? Is that a realistic concern if failing later doesn't matter? – Etan Reisner Nov 5 '15 at 15:33
  • @parthasarathy - please update your question with these details. Comments are a great place for comments. – ghoti Nov 5 '15 at 15:44
  • Also, do ./kp and ./NoSuchCommand actually exist? Or is that what you're actually trying to test? – ghoti Nov 5 '15 at 15:46
3

Here is an example which will show the result of a process whether it is started successfully or not.

#!/bin/bash
$1 & #executes a program in background which is provided as an argument
pid=$! #stores executed process id in pid
count=$(ps -A| grep $pid |wc -l) #check whether process is still running
if [[ $count -eq 0 ]] #if process is already terminated, then there can be two cases, the process executed and stop successfully or it is terminated abnormally
then
        if wait $pid; then #checks if process executed successfully or not
                echo "success"
        else                    #process terminated abnormally
                echo "failed (returned $?)"
        fi
else
        echo "success"  #process is still running
fi

#Note: The above script will only provide a result whether process started successfully or not. If porcess starts successfully and later it terminates abnormally then this sciptwill not provide a correct result
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  • Yes, this works fine without waiting for anything of the launched processes – parthasarathy Nov 7 '15 at 9:10
2

The accepted answer doesn't work as advertised.

The count in this check will always be at least 1 because "grep $pid" will find both the process with $pid if it exists and the grep.

count=$(ps -A| grep $pid |wc -l)
if [[ $count -eq 0 ]]
then
    ### We can never get here
else
    echo "success"  #process is still running
fi

Changing the above to check for a count of 1 or excluding the grep from the count should make the original work.

Here is an alternate (maybe simpler) implementation of the original example.

#!/bin/bash
$1 & # executes a program in background which is provided as an argument
pid=$! # stores executed process id in pid

# check whether process is still running
# The "[^[]" excludes the grep from finding itself in the ps output
if ps | grep "$pid[^[]" >/dev/null
then
    echo "success (running)"  # process is still running
else
    # If the process is already terminated, then there are 2 cases:
    # 1) the process executed and stop successfully
    # 2) it is terminated abnormally

    if wait $pid # check if process executed successfully or not
    then
        echo "success (ran)"
    else
        echo "failed (returned $?)" # process terminated abnormally
    fi
fi

# Note: The above script will detect if a process started successfully or not. If process is running when we check, but later it terminates abnormally then this script will not detect this.
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  • ps -A| grep 121233 ( 121233 being an incorrect pid ) never returns anything as the output of ps -A is feed to grep. I have tested this on rhel 6.6 and on Ubuntu 16.04 – parthasarathy Jan 12 '18 at 12:14
0

sorry missed this requirement "Script cannot wait or sleep"

launch the background program, get it's pid. Wait a second. Then check it is still running with kill -0

kill -0 status is taken from $? and this is used to decide if the process is still running

#!/bin/bash

./$1 &
pid=$!

sleep 1;

kill -0 $pid
stat=$?
if [ $stat -eq 0 ] ; then
  echo "running as $!"
  exit 0
else
  echo "$! did not start"
  exit 1
fi

Maybe if your super speedy C++ program cannot wait for a second, it also cannot expect to be able to launch a load of shell commands at a high rate per second?

Maybe you need to implement a queue here?

Sorry for more questions than answers

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  • This will fail if the process legitimately dies in that second though. – Etan Reisner Nov 5 '15 at 15:33
  • @EtanReisner right, good point. The problem with not having a sleep is that if the program being started does not exist then the kill -0 still succeeds as it signals the shell that is still trying to find the program to run (at least in my testing it does) – Vorsprung Nov 5 '15 at 15:40
  • 2
    You don't even need to wait; cmd & kill -0 $!. There's a still a race condition for jobs that can successfully complete before kill is called, but I suspect any real jobs will run long enough to ignore it. – chepner Nov 5 '15 at 15:42
0

use jobs.

put the following in a bash script and execute

#!/bin/bash

{ sleep 1 ; echo sleep1 ; } &
sleep 0
jobs
wait

echo nosleep &
sleep 0
jobs
wait

echo exit1
false &
sleep 0
jobs
wait

notexisting &
sleep 0
jobs
wait

./existingbutnotexecutable &
sleep 0
jobs
wait

output

$ ./testrun.sh 
[1]+  Running                 { sleep 1; echo sleep1; } &
sleep1
nosleep
[1]+  Done                    echo nosleep
exit1
[1]+  Exit 1                  false
./testrun.sh: line 19: notexisting: command not found
[1]+  Exit 127                notexisting
./testrun.sh: line 24: ./existingbutnotexecutable: Permission denied
[1]+  Exit 126                ./existingbutnotexecutable

from the output of jobs we can differ between:

  • a background job that is still running
  • a job that is done running
  • a job that is done running with nonezero exitstatus
  • a job that could not run because command not found
  • and a job that could not run because not executable.

maybe there are even more cases but i did not research more.

the wait is just to make sure that there are no more than one background jobs at once.

the sleep 0 is necessary otherwise jobs will report process is running even before the shell is able to report error command not found. i tried echo but it seems to be not enough delay.

remove the sleep and you get this output

$ ./testrun.sh 
[1]+  Running                 { sleep 1; echo sleep1; } &
sleep1
[1]+  Running                 echo nosleep &
nosleep
exit1
[1]+  Running                 false &
[1]+  Running                 notexisting &
./testrun.sh: line 19: notexisting: command not found
[1]+  Running                 ./existingbutnotexecutable &
./testrun.sh: line 24: ./existingbutnotexecutable: Permission denied

notice that jobs always says "running" and always comes before the result of the commands. error or not.

here is one possibility to act based on the output of jobs

#!/bin/bash

isrunsuccess() {
  case $(jobs) in
    *Running*)   echo ">>> running" ;;
    *Done*)      echo ">>> done" ;;
    *Exit\ 127*) echo ">>> not found" ;;
    *Exit\ 126*) echo ">>> not executable" ;;
    *Exit*)      echo ">>> done nonzero exitstatus" ;;
  esac
}

{ sleep 1 ; echo sleep1 ; } &
sleep 0
isrunsuccess
wait

echo nosleep &
sleep 0
isrunsuccess
wait

echo exit1
false &
sleep 0
isrunsuccess
wait

notexisting &
sleep 0
isrunsuccess
wait

./existingbutnotexecutable &
sleep 0
isrunsuccess
wait

output

$ ./testrun.sh 
>>> running
sleep1
nosleep
>>> done
exit1
>>> done nonzero exitstatus
./testrun.sh: line 29: notexisting: command not found
>>> not found
./testrun.sh: line 34: ./existingbutnotexecutable: Permission denied
>>> not executable

you can merge the "did run" and "did not run" cases

isrunsuccess() {
  case $(jobs) in
    *Exit\ 127*|*Exit\ 126*) echo ">>> did not run" ;;
    *Running*|*Done*|*Exit*) echo ">>> still running or was running" ;;
  esac
}

output

$ ./testrun.sh 
>>> still running or was running
sleep1
nosleep
>>> still running or was running
exit1
>>> still running or was running
./testrun.sh: line 26: notexisting: command not found
>>> did not run
./testrun.sh: line 31: ./existingbutnotexecutable: Permission denied
>>> did not run

other methods to check contents of string in bash: How do you tell if a string contains another string in Unix shell scripting?

documentation of bash stating that exitstatus 127 for not found and 126 for not executable: https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/Exit-Status.html

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