4

I would like to raise KeyboardInterrupt from a C extension.

In C, I've created a module named siginfo via below + setup.py:

static void siginfo_handler(int signum, siginfo_t *siginfo, void *context) {
    printf("got signal from '%d'", siginfo->si_pid);

    //raise(PyExc_KeyboardInterrupt) <--- i want to raise keyboard interrupt here
}

static PyObject * siginfo_register(PyObject *self, PyObject *args) {
    struct sigaction act;
    memset(&act, '\0', sizeof(act));
    act.sa_sigaction = &siginfo_handler;
    act.sa_flags = SA_SIGINFO;
    sigaction(SIGINT, &act, NULL);

    PY_RETURN_NONE;
}

static PyMethodDef SiginfoMethods[] = {
   //blah blah filled out
};
PyMODINIT_FUNC initsiginfo(void) {
   //blah blah filled out
}

In Python:

import siginfo
import os
siginfo.register()

print "talk to me with kill -SIGINT %d" % os.getpid()

try:
    while True:
        time.sleep(1)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    print 'got keybaord interrupt'

The C extension is catching SIGINT fine, but I don't know how to raise a Python exception from it so that I can catch it in Python code.

Any ideas?

EDIT:
I found out that I can raise KeyboardInterrupt by:

PyErr_SetString(PyExc_KeyboardInterrupt, "SIGINT received");

but it does seg fault if i raise it within signal handler.

it does not seg fault if it's raised within other function.

Why cant I raise it in signal handler?

2
  • 3
    I'm not certain there's any way you can get this to work. Certainly not from a signal handler. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 5 '15 at 19:16
  • 1
    @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams it certainly works from a signal handler. – tynn Nov 7 '15 at 18:31
4

You're just not in a state to execute Python code when getting the signal. Before raising an error you need to acquire the GIL:

static void siginfo_handler(int signum, siginfo_t *siginfo, void *context) {
    printf("got signal from '%d'\n", siginfo->si_pid);
    PyGILState_STATE gstate = PyGILState_Ensure();
    PyErr_SetString(PyExc_KeyboardInterrupt, "SIGINT received");
    PyGILState_Release(gstate);
}
9
  • 1
    This does not work reliably. It works most of the time, but it almost guarantees unpredictable and unreproducible problems and crashes. Signal handlers are only allowed to call async-signal-safe functions. Signal handers should not allocate memory or even call printf(). Signal handlers should definitely not call any Python C/API, unless specifically allowed to do so. – sterin Nov 8 '15 at 10:28
  • this works great for me. havent had any issues. but i do worry about what the above comment is saying. I dont fully understand it though @user99279 – ealeon Nov 16 '15 at 5:22
  • @ealeon Python has a library for setting signal handler. Maybe use this instead. It might be a little more work, but safer. – tynn Nov 16 '15 at 8:22
  • 1
    @ealeon a signal handler is called asynchronously in the same thread as your normal code. It could be triggered in the middle of any operation. For example, the PyErr_SetString() function creates a copy of the string and allocates memory for it. If the regular program allocates memory in the same exact time it might result in memory corruption which only be exposed much later. This is obviously probabilistic, the more signals you get the more likely it is to occur. – sterin Nov 16 '15 at 10:05
  • @ealeon may I suggest you describe your higher-level goal. That is, what are you trying to achieve that brought the need for an exception that the normal Python signal handling could not provide? – sterin Nov 16 '15 at 10:08
0

You cannot call arbitrary Python C/API functions from inside a signal handler. Signal handlers are extremely limited in what they can do. See the here and here for more details.

Python deals with it by having a very simple signal handler that sets a variable of type volatile sig_atomic_t to 1. This variable is checked periodically by the interpreter raises a Python exception as part of the regular control flow if it is set to 1.

The main problem is when the interpreter calls C code that takes a long time to execute. The exception will not be raised until the C code returns.

Fortunately, this does not happen too often because most system calls are interrupted when a signal is delivered. In the following program (very similar to yours), the call to time.sleep() will be interrupted by the signal and control will return to the Python code which will raise the exception.

import time
try:
    while True:
        time.sleep(1)
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    print 'got keybaord interrupt'

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