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So I am a little confused as to how I am supposed to handle this problem. I have been asked to write a program as part of a job application. It requires me to take in 2 numbers. One of them I need to check if it is an int 1-32, another I have to make sure its bigger than 0.

In the task description it says "throw a GameException".

When then looking into exceptions and creating an exception class, it seems that this is not the right use of exceptions.

Which way would you normally attack this problem?

  • Do you have any code you've tried yet? Things aren't looking good for your job, bro. – 9Deuce Nov 6 '15 at 14:07
  • I have to agree with the above comments. What will happen to you if you get offered the job? Will you ask questions on here about every detail of your work? Will your work day be spent just waiting for answers? You'll be fired in no time. Sorry. – NickJ Nov 6 '15 at 14:09
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    When then looking into exceptions and creating an exception class, it seems that this is not the right use of exceptions. What made you think that? – Stefan Nov 6 '15 at 14:10
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    @MDeSchaepmeester Well that really depends on the job, but that comment is a touch rude. – DavidG Nov 6 '15 at 14:11
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    If the spec calls for exceptions, then the component should throw exceptions. The component could be part of a bigger picture where the approach makes more sense. As a word of professional advice... Rather than approaching with "I don't think your design is right", instead approach with "Help me to understand your design, I'd like to make sure I maintain the goals of the architecture in my implementation. Can you explain to me the semantics of this GameException and how consuming code is expected to use it?" – David Nov 6 '15 at 14:14
4

To create an Exception in Java, you could do something like this:

class GameException extends Exception {
 GameException() {
  super();
 }
 GameException(String msg) {
  super(msg);
 }
 GameException(String msg, Throwable cause) {
  super(msg, cause);
 }
 GameException(Throwable cause) {
  super(cause);
 }
}

To use this Exception, you can do the following:

if(!checkNumbers(num1, num2)) throw new GameException();

Where checkNumbers() is your method on seeing if your two input numbers are acceptable with your requirements.

| improve this answer | |
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    is he asking how exceptions work though? Rather than where they should be applied?! – Ross Drew Nov 6 '15 at 14:14
  • I might not of made it clear, I have used exceptions in another language but in Java and so I was confused as to how they can be implemented. – Murphy Nov 6 '15 at 14:22
  • @Murphy: One key difference in Java is that it has checked exceptions, which could play a significant role in a component spec. If the consuming code is excepting a component to throw a given exception, then the compiler is going to want to enforce that. Not knowing the consuming code or anything about the architecture, an almost questionable use of exceptions in one small component may fit a much larger design pretty effectively without requiring changes to the consuming code. – David Nov 6 '15 at 14:24
  • "When then looking into exceptions and creating an exception class, it seems that this is not the right use of exceptions." I took this as OP was unsure of how to create and implement an Exception class. – MrPublic Nov 6 '15 at 14:27

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