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I'd like my templateCache to be in my main angular module - for the sake of explanation let's call that module "app." I set up a gulp-angular-templatecache task to create the template cache:

gulp.task('templates', function () {
return gulp.src(path.templates)
    .pipe(templateCache({
        moduleSystem: 'IIFE',
        standalone: false,
        root: 'views/',
        module: "app"
    }))
    .pipe(gulp.dest(path.dist));
});

This creates an IIFE module that looks like this:

(function(){
    angular.module("app").run(["$templateCache", function($templateCache) {
    $templateCache.put("views/add_tag_dlg.html",...
    ...
})();

That's pretty reasonable, but in order to work the main.js (which contains the angular entry point) needs to run FIRST, to create the 'app' module.

I believe this is a chicken-and-egg situation. The application will fail to load because I'm initializing it prior to the templates being loaded; but I can't initialize the templates ahead of time because angular module 'app' hasn't been created yet.

The only solution I have found so far is to make the gulp task create its own separate module, let's call it "templates":

gulp.task('templates', function () {
return gulp.src(path.templates)
    .pipe(templateCache({
        moduleSystem: 'IIFE',
        standalone: true,
        root: 'views/',
        module: "templates"
    }))
    .pipe(gulp.dest(path.dist));
});

Which produces this:

(function(){
    angular.module("templates", []).run(["$templateCache", function($templateCache) {
    $templateCache.put("views/add_tag_dlg.html",...
    ...
})();

Note that instead of just using the angular module, it creates its own. To make this work, when I create my main module it has to depend on 'templates':

var app = angular.module('app', ['templates', ... ]);

This works, but it's not what I want, because now there's no way to run without compiling the templates. I prefer a workflow where I don't need the templates to be compiled in order to debug ... they will just get loaded by the browser as resources under the views/ subdirectory.

So I'm not entirely sure what to do here. The best I have come up with so far is to have a different index.html for both dev and prod scenarios, and stop treating 'templates' like a systemjs global module... then for dev load an empty template cache, and for prod load the generated one.

It's either that, or I can remove angular from the systemjs loading strategy altogether and just load angular myself, but I hate to do that. It's really nice that I just load app.js, and angular (and all its components) are listed in systemjs as dependencies of app.js so it just does everything itself in the right order.

None of the seeds I have been able to locate really deal with this problem. What is the prevailing thought on how to handle template caches in a systemjs environment?

0

There is a SystemJs plugin for caching templates. Using it may be a large refactor, but you can probably use their method of caching templates to get what you want:

angular.module('ng').run(["$templateCache", function($templateCache) {
    $templateCache.put("views/add_tag_dlg.html",...
    ...
})();

By changing the module in your task from app to ng.

0

There is a gulp plugins which can read your routes,directives and replace the templateUrl with the template referenced in the templateUrl.

src
+-hello-world
  |-hello-world-directive.js
  +-hello-world-template.html

hello-world-directive.js:

angular.module('test').directive('helloWorld', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        // relative path to template
        templateUrl: 'hello-world-template.html'
    };
});

hello-world-template.html:

<strong>
    Hello world!
</strong>

gulpfile.js:

var gulp = require('gulp');
var embedTemplates = require('gulp-angular-embed-templates');

gulp.task('js:build', function () {
    gulp.src('src/scripts/**/*.js')
        .pipe(embedTemplates())
        .pipe(gulp.dest('./dist'));
});

gulp-angular-embed-templates will generate the following file:

angular.module('test').directive('helloWorld', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        template:'<strong>Hello world!</strong>'
    };
});

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