I do not understand how the while loop dissects the information. Could someone please explain how it works?

private static int sumDigits(int number) {
    int sum = 0;                //Initialize sum
    int rem;                    //Initialize remainder

    while (number > 0) {            //If number is greater than 0 true
        rem = number % 10;          //<-- ??
        sum += rem;                 //<-- ??
        number = number/10;         //<-- ??
    }
    return sum;
}
  • 1
    Do you know what %, += and / do? If you know what each operation does, you can work out an example on paper and figure this out. – lurker Nov 7 '15 at 1:44
  • 1
    "I've created a method" but you don't understand what it says. Are you sure that it was you who wrote it? Try a small program and print the results to see it in action. Learn by example. – code_dredd Nov 7 '15 at 1:50
  • 1
    I don't understand how you created a method but doesn't understand what it does. If this is homework and (I am not accusing) you got the code from somewhere else, note that professors check for software plagiarism, so be careful :) – sam Nov 7 '15 at 1:51
  • Excuse me, yes I need to edit the comment. I copied the answer from a homework helping website, but I'm still unsure of how it works. Thank you. – Oh David Nov 7 '15 at 1:59

The key to understanding this code is the use of two operators - the remainder operator % and the integer division operator /.

  • The % operator produces the remainder from dividing by its right-hand side. In case of % 10 this means "get the last decimal digit of the number"
  • The / division operator discards the remainder, producing an integer result. Dividing an integer by zero discards its last digit.

For example, if you start with n = 1234 and do

int d = n % 10;
int r = n / 10;

then d would be 4 and r would be 123.

At this point it should be clear how the loop proceeds to termination, and how it accumulates the sum of number's digits as it goes through the iterations.

  • So to my understanding, if we start with n = 1234, d = 4, and r = 123. The loop would repeat, and d would = 3, and r would then = 12 and continue? If so where's the information stored and what adds them together.. – Oh David Nov 7 '15 at 1:52
  • @OhDavid Think of an example where number is 1234. After the first iteration number would be 123. After the second iteration it would be 12. After the third iteration it would be 1. After the forth iteration it would be zero, at which point the loop would terminate. – dasblinkenlight Nov 7 '15 at 1:54
  • Thank you for clarifying that. Could you please explain how the numbers are stored, if the variables are being replaced with new ints? and what adds the numbers? – Oh David Nov 7 '15 at 1:57
  • @OhDavid I suggest you check out this link which attempts to explain integer arithmetic. – Thevenin Nov 7 '15 at 1:59
  • @OhDavid number = number/10; is an assignment. The value on the right is calculated using the old value of number, and then the old value is replaced with the result of calculation. – dasblinkenlight Nov 7 '15 at 1:59

Filled in the comments where you noted you had trouble

private static int sumDigits(int number) {
    int sum = 0;                //Initialize sum
    int rem;                    //Initialize remainder



 while (number > 0) {            //If number is greater than 0 true
    rem = number % 10;          //rem now contains the remainder of the number / 10
    //Keep in mind, number % 10 will give you the rightmost digit in your number
    sum += rem;                 //add the remainder to your running total
    number = number/10;         //divide your number by 10 so you can find
    //the next right most digit in your number
}
return sum;

This example tries to sum all the digits of a number % is used to get the last digit on each while loop and divided by 10 is done to reduce the number and sum is added for all digits see the inline comment by me

private static int sumDigits(int number) { int sum = 0; //Initialize sum int rem; //Initialize remainder

    while (number > 0) {            //If number is greater than 0 true
        rem = number % 10; //remainder after division by 10 e.g 12%10=2
        sum += rem;  //sum=sum+rem               //<-- ??
        number = number/10;//reduce one number by dividing to 10         //<-- ??
    }
    return sum;
}

Let's step through the code with an example. Let's call sumDigits(1234).

The first time through the while loop, number equals 1234. rem = 1234 % 10, which evaluates to rem = 4 as the remainder from dividing 1234 by 10 is 4 (which is the rightmost digit in number). sum += rem evaluates to sum += 4, so the value of sum is 4. Since number is an int, storing the value of itself divided by 10 results in 123 being stored in number.

The second time through the while loop, number equals 123. rem = 123 % 10, which evaluates to rem = 3 as the remainder from dividing 123 by 10 is 3 (which is the rightmost digit in number). sum += rem evaluates to sum += 3, so the value of sum is 7, since sum was equal to 4 at the end of the last loop iteration. Since number is an int, storing the value of itself divided by 10 results in 12 being stored in number.

Repeat this two more times, and you'll end up with number equalling zero (as int(1/10) = 0), therefore, you'll exit the loop and sum will contain the sum of the digits in number.

  • Wow perfect. Thank you very much this was the most clarifying explanation that didn't go over my head. I completely understand it now. – Oh David Nov 7 '15 at 2:05
  • I've found that stepping through functions/algorithms with sample data is the best way to understand what's going on. It gets a little more complicated as you learn about more complex data types, but like they say, the best way to learn is to do - and the best way to learn what code is doing to do what the code does! Best of luck on your learning, – Zany Cadence Nov 7 '15 at 2:12

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.