71

I have been experimenting with ES6 classes and am wondering if you can change class names dynamically? For example

class [Some dynamic name] {}; 
19
  • 1
    Why would you want a dynamic name for a class? What would be the point? Nov 9, 2015 at 9:23
  • 1
    That says it all really. The instance should be dynamic, not your class template, but if you're convinced this is the correct approach you can just create a standard function using the Function constructor and use the prototype as you would have in ES5. Or use a task running like Gulp/Grunt to generate the classes pre-build Nov 9, 2015 at 10:12
  • 1
    If using ES5 classes, then let tmp = { [name](){} }; and to access that named function o[name]. Would be cool if we could do that with classes: let o = { class [name] {} }.
    – trusktr
    Jul 14, 2016 at 2:28
  • 1
    @CodingIntrigue I came here looking for something (read dynamic class creation) but your comment " use a task running like Gulp/Grunt to generate the classes " is sending me on a different direction which solves a lot of problem which I hadn't thought off. Thanks ......
    – Ananda
    Apr 8, 2017 at 15:34
  • 10
    That says it all really. The instance should be dynamic, not your class template. I highly disagree. Coming from Java, which is highly static, I appreciate JS being dynamic more every day. I want to set a class name dynamically so my class won't be anonymous. And I want to create classes dynamically because I am working on a library to create and use mixins to achieve multiple inheritance with ES6 classes. The longer I use classical inheritance, the more I have been getting convinced that single inheritance doesn't cut it. JS is fantastic because it is dynamic, not despite of it. Apr 11, 2017 at 21:14

6 Answers 6

69
let C = class
{ // ...
}
Object.defineProperty (C, 'name', {value: 'TheName'});

// test: 
let itsName =  (new C()).constructor.name;
// itsName === 'TheName' -> true
7
  • 6
    Hello, it would be helpful if you provided an explanation of your code.
    – tima
    Sep 9, 2017 at 15:40
  • I believe this is the correct answer. Note: Object.defineProperty(C, 'name', ...) works while C.name = ... throws Script Error: "name" is read-only (at least in Firefox). Feb 21, 2018 at 16:42
  • This should be the correct answer, the accepted answer class does not have a name. Apr 6, 2018 at 12:28
  • 1
    Yes this is the correct answer as of the current date. There is no way of doing this in the class definition itself
    – Hoffmann
    Sep 4, 2018 at 12:36
  • 1
    The issue with this is that if I do console.log(new C()) it prints C {}, but TheName {} would be better. Feb 10 at 9:01
31

There is a pretty simple way to do it:

const nameIt = (name, cls) => ({[name] : class extends cls {}})[name];

Here's the demo.

It uses an object literal to define a field with a desired name that would hold a new class. This causes the new class to automatically get the desired name. After we're done with that, we extract that new class and return it.

Note the parens around the object literal, so that curly braces don't get mistaken for a code block (...) => {...}.

Of course, putting an existing class into named fields won't change the class, so this only works if you are creating a new class. If you only need a dynamic name in one place where you define the class you are naming, you can drop an extra inheritance and just go:

const myClass = {[name]: class {
    ...
}}[name];
2
  • could we add method also?? and add new propherty again??
    – Zum Dummi
    Mar 12, 2019 at 3:38
  • This technique won't work if we have a static method referring the class as "this". Example : static create = (args) => new this(args); In such case the name will be "_class" Oct 26, 2020 at 16:12
24

There is probably a better solution for whatever you are trying to achieve, but you can assign a class expression to an object:

let classes = {};
classes[someName] = class { ... };

This didn't really change in ES2015: if you want to create a dynamically named binding, you have to use an object or some other mapping instead.

15
  • Actually, what changed with ES6, is that the classes' .name is now someName.
    – Bergi
    Nov 9, 2015 at 15:28
  • 1
    Or wait, that was only when doing {[someName]: class {…}}
    – Bergi
    Nov 9, 2015 at 15:35
  • 1
    How to add decorators to such class expression? Apr 7, 2016 at 12:17
  • @FabianZeindl: there is no reason this shouldn't work, since this standard paractice even before ES6 (except for the class value of course). May 14, 2016 at 15:13
  • I checked again, I have a custom babel-transform which, by accident disables this. May 15, 2016 at 11:42
4

To take it a bit further playing with dynamic class names and dynamic inheritance, when using babel you can just do something like this:

    function withname(name, _parent) {
        return class MyDinamicallyNamedClass extends (_parent||Object) {
            static get name() { return name || _parent.name }
        }
    }
2
  • 4
    But console still output class MyDinamicallyNamedClass ...
    – trusktr
    Oct 2, 2017 at 5:24
  • Yeah but I think the point he is making is that       ( MyDinamicallyNamedClass instanceof _parent) returns true \n       (btw thats not how you spell Dynamically, lOlz)
    – JΛYDΞV
    May 22, 2021 at 7:45
4

One way, even if not ideal, is simple with eval:

~function() {
    const name = "Lorem"

    eval(`
        var ${name} = class ${name} {} 
    `)

    console.log(Lorem) // class Lorem {}
}()

Note, it has to be with var. Using let, const, and plain class inside the eval won't work.

Another way with Function:

~function() {
    const name = "Lorem"

    const c = new Function(`
        return class ${name} {}
    `)()

    console.log(c) // class Lorem {}
}()

Sitenote: you can pass scope variables into the Function and use them inside:

~function() {
    const name = "Lorem"
    const val = "foo"

    const Class = new Function('val', `
        return class ${name} {
            constructor() {
                console.log( val )
            }
        }
    `)( val )

    console.log(Class) // class Lorem {}
    new Class // "foo"
}()
5
  • 1
    Note that using Function this way is also eval and carries the same risks. May 12, 2018 at 19:01
  • 3
    That's only a problem if your sticking 3rd-party code inside the Function or eval. It isn't a problem if you own the code your sticking in there (f.e. the code string is generated in the same scope as the Function or eval, with no input from the outside).
    – trusktr
    May 16, 2018 at 20:19
  • @eyelidlessness That's only a problem if your sticking 3rd-party code inside the Function or eval. It isn't a problem if you own the code your sticking in there (f.e. the code string is generated in the same scope as the Function or eval, with no input from the outside). As you can see in my example, the strings are generated in-place, which is completely safe (and assuming my code is inside a module, it is impossible for variables to be modified from the outside).
    – trusktr
    May 16, 2018 at 20:20
  • I've updated my examples to use closures (much like modules).
    – trusktr
    May 16, 2018 at 20:21
  • 2
    It's still worth pointing out because people tend to take code examples and expand on them. It may not be immediately obvious to someone less familiar with how this works that it uses eval. I strongly encourage you to add a warning to that effect. May 17, 2018 at 19:08
0

I can suggest another type of approach, just async but it works:

let protoExtend = function ( className, extendsFrom = Array ) {

    return new Promise( function ( done, fail ) {
        
        const src = URL.createObjectURL(
            new Blob( [`
                self.${className}(
                    class ${className} extends ${extendsFrom.name} {}
                );`
            ] )
        );

        self[ className ] = function ( prototype ){
            URL.revokeObjectURL(src);
            delete self[ className ];
            return done( prototype );
        };

        document.head.append( Object.assign(
            document.createElement("script"), { src }
        ));
        
    });
    
};

triggering class constructor with parent class and a name for new child class:

let myClass = await protoExtend("HelloWorld", String);

now we have what we wanted: dynamically created children without any eval:

new myClass('test');

result can be shown at console as well: console result image

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