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Probably duplicate, but What is gettimeofday() equivalent in c++11 ?

I am trying to get 64 bit timestamp with microseconds, similar to Java / Python.

  • 2
    If you think it's "probably duplicate", why did you not spend time instead finding that duplicate? – Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 9 '15 at 12:53
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Use std::chrono::system_clock::now().

UPDATE

You can check the necessary minimal precision by this static assert:

static_assert (std::ratio_less_equal<std::chrono::system_clock::duration::period,
    std::ratio<1,100> >::value, "");
  • Are we sure it is always offering a microsecond resolution? Can't a C++11 compliant implementation only give a decisecond-accurate system clock? – Basile Starynkevitch Nov 9 '15 at 12:49
  • @BasileStarynkevitch - decisecond good for me. I don't think Java do microseconds. – Nick Nov 9 '15 at 12:51
  • @Nick I've no idea what Java's resolution is but you seemed to think Java measures in microseconds when you posted your question: trying to get 64 bit timestamp with microseconds, similar to Java / Python. – mah Nov 9 '15 at 12:57
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    there is also a high_resolution_clock which might or might not be the same as system_clock – sp2danny Nov 9 '15 at 13:00
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To get the highest resolution supported by your system, use std::high_resolution_clock::now. The high-resolution clock may be an alias for std::chrono::system_clock.

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