14

I'm facing a compile error when trying to use lambdas / function references with kotlin:

class Foo {

    fun getFilteredList(){
        val numbers = listOf(1, 2, 3)
        numbers.filter(::isOdd) // prints [1, 3]
    }

    fun isOdd(x: Int): Boolean = x % 2 != 0

}

But I get a compile time error saying a type mismatch:

Error:(18, 16) Gradle: Type inference failed: inline fun kotlin.Iterable.filter(predicate: (T) -> kotlin.Boolean): kotlin.List cannot be applied to receiver: kotlin.List arguments: (kotlin.reflect.KFunction2) Error:(18, 23) Gradle: Type mismatch: inferred type is kotlin.reflect.KFunction2 but (kotlin.Int) -> ??? was expected Error:(18, 23) Gradle: Type mismatch: inferred type is kotlin.reflect.KFunction2 but (kotlin.Int) -> kotlin.Boolean was expected Error:(18, 25) Gradle: Left-hand side of a callable reference with a receiver parameter cannot be empty. Please specify the type of the receiver before '::' explicitly

I'm not sure what the error is nor what type I should specify explicitly before '::'

Another question: Can I use another objects function as reference in kotlin? Something like this:

class Bar {
    fun isOdd(x: Int): Boolean = x % 2 != 0
}

class Foo {

    fun getFilteredList(){
        val bar = Bar()
        val numbers = listOf(1, 2, 3)
        numbers.filter(bar::isOdd) // Use Bar's method
    }
}
18

On the second example: yes, the bound function reference syntax is supported since Kotlin 1.1, so you can write bar::isOdd similarly to Java.

In the first example, the error is trying to say that isOdd is in fact a function of two parameters (of types Foo and Int), and passing a function taking two parameters as an argument whose type is function of one parameter is not allowed. To make the example compile, you can make isOdd a top-level or a local function, which would make it a function of one parameter of type Int. Or, if you use Kotlin 1.1+, use the bound function reference syntax and simply write this::isOdd.

3
  • Would be handy, because of testablity. If I pass a lambda directly there is no real way to unit test the lambda itself. Hence I was looking for a way to use a function, since a function itself is unit testable. As far as I see you can also define a function in a class like this: class Foo{ val isOdd = fun(i : Int) : Boolean { return i % 2 != 0 } } . Then in the class Foo you can pass isOdd instead of a lambda and isOdd will still be unit testable. However, this seems to be a workaround. Would be pretty nice to have similar function references as java 8 just for unit testing – sockeqwe Nov 9 '15 at 21:11
  • @udalov What you mean by a local function? How do you create one? By a lambda? – voddan Nov 10 '15 at 7:52
  • A local function is the one declared within another function, see kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/functions.html#local-functions – Alexander Udalov Nov 10 '15 at 8:52
7

That's funny. "Java strikes back". Haha

Your problem is simple: you declared isOdd in class Foo, right? Then it is not a function, but a method. Which means that it requires an instance of Foo to be passed in (the this reference) - that's why it is a function of 2 parameters: Foo.(Int) -> Boolean. And the syntax error shows that - a reference to a method looks like Foo::isOdd.

Anyway, declaring a non-static method which does not use the object is an antipattern even in Java, don't you agree?

The problem might be solved by declaring a free function without a class or by making it an extension: fun Int.isOdd()

P.S. Regarding your second question - that feature is not supported yet.

3
  • I have to disagree about the anti-pattern. isOdd() could be an overridable method, and the class could use it to implement the template pattern. Java supports such method references just fine, and I think Kotlin should support it. I see that as a step back when coming from pure Java 8. Same as not being able to use a lambda to implement a functional interface defined in Kotlin: not being able to name things is a step backward to me. And the difference between Java interfaces and Kotlin interfaces is bizarre. – JB Nizet Nov 10 '15 at 7:36
  • 1
    @nizet OK, you have your point. I agree that kotlin is a bit strange with functional references. As someone said, functions are not first-class citizens, but lambdas are. I believe that Kotlin must support not less than Java – voddan Nov 10 '15 at 7:56
  • Functions in Kotlin are first class citizens. The issue here is that a function that has two parameters (receiver, param0) cannot be used in place of one that expects only one parameter. What you are looking for there is a method closure, which can turn a method into a function by carrying the reference to the receiver into the call. The code could easily do this by passing in a lambda that calls the class method. That would close on the instance of the class as the receiver. Later Kotlin might do this automatically. – Jayson Minard Dec 27 '15 at 2:40

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