I'm really eager to start using Google's new Tensorflow library in C++. The website and docs are just really unclear in terms of how to build the project's C++ API and I don't know where to start.

Can someone with more experience help by discovering and sharing a guide to using tensorflow's C++ API?

  • 1
    +1 for your question. Any chance to install/compile on Windows ? Website shows only Linux/Mac . A guide to have bazel run is needed. This example could be a good starting point to learn: github.com/tensorflow/tensorflow/tree/master/tensorflow/… – alrama Nov 13 '15 at 15:39
  • This question still doesn't have an answer. How to install just C++ tensorflow C++ API libraries has no guide to it, and the accepted answer does not give any guidence on how to that, even through any of multiple provided links. – iantonuk Dec 19 '17 at 9:29
  • For Windows, I found this question and its accepted answer most helpful. By building the example trainer project, you build the entire TensorFlow project as a static library, then link to it. You can make your own projects and link TensorFlow the same way. – omatai Feb 20 at 21:24
up vote 44 down vote accepted

To get started, you should download the source code from Github, by following the instructions here (you'll need Bazel and a recent version of GCC).

The C++ API (and the backend of the system) is in tensorflow/core. Right now, only the C++ Session interface, and the C API are being supported. You can use either of these to execute TensorFlow graphs that have been built using the Python API and serialized to a GraphDef protocol buffer. There is also an experimental feature for building graphs in C++, but this is currently not quite as full-featured as the Python API (e.g. no support for auto-differentiation at present). You can see an example program that builds a small graph in C++ here.

The second part of the C++ API is the API for adding a new OpKernel, which is the class containing implementations of numerical kernels for CPU and GPU. There are numerous examples of how to build these in tensorflow/core/kernels, as well as a tutorial for adding a new op in C++.

  • 3
    No installation instructions for C++ is shown tensorflow.org/install, but there are example programs shown tensorflow.org/api_guides/cc/guide that clearly is using C++ api. How exactly did you install C++ for Tensorflow? – user3667089 Jun 5 '17 at 23:39
  • @user3667089 The location of the installation procedure is now located at tensorflow.org/install/install_sources – Dwight Jun 27 '17 at 20:07
  • 3
    @Dwight I saw that page before but I don't see any info about C++ – user3667089 Jun 27 '17 at 20:24
  • 2
    @user3667089 The headers, after the installation procedure above, will be located within the dist-packages folder of the python distribution you choose during the installation procedure(such as /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages). In that folder there will be a folder tensorflow/include, which will have all the headers. You'll need to do a little bit of work for making sure whatever you are building has that on it's include path. I personally use CMAKE, so am trudging through this. – Dwight Jun 28 '17 at 18:15
  • Hi mrry, It's been 2 years since your answers. I checked out tensorflow c++ API reference. I think It is now possible to build graph with tensorflow. But I don't find equivalent API to dataset/dataset provider which I think is crucial for speeding up training. Do you have information on this? – scott huang Dec 13 '17 at 7:56

To add to @mrry's post, I put together a tutorial that explains how to load a TensorFlow graph with the C++ API. It's very minimal and should help you understand how all of the pieces fit together. Here's the meat of it:

Requirements:

  • Bazel installed
  • Clone TensorFlow repo

Folder structure:

  • tensorflow/tensorflow/|project name|/
  • tensorflow/tensorflow/|project name|/|project name|.cc (e.g. https://gist.github.com/jimfleming/4202e529042c401b17b7)
  • tensorflow/tensorflow/|project name|/BUILD

BUILD:

cc_binary(
    name = "<project name>",
    srcs = ["<project name>.cc"],
    deps = [
        "//tensorflow/core:tensorflow",
    ]
)

Two caveats for which there are probably workarounds:

  • Right now, building things needs to happen within the TensorFlow repo.
  • The compiled binary is huge (103MB).

https://medium.com/@jimfleming/loading-a-tensorflow-graph-with-the-c-api-4caaff88463f

  • 1
    Hello Jim. is this tutorial still the best/easiest way to compile a c++ project with TF? Or is there an easier way now as you predict at the end of your post? – Sander Apr 14 '16 at 21:41
  • 3
    I believe there is now a built-in build rule. I submitted a PR for it a while back. I'm not sure about the caveats. I would expect the first to remain as it's a result of Bazel, not TF. The second could likely be improved upon. – Jim Apr 16 '16 at 0:02
  • I followed that tutorial, but when running ./loader I get an error: Not found: models/train.pb. – 9th Dimension Jul 6 '16 at 18:44
  • 3
    Is there now way to have your project outside of the TensorFlow source code directory? – Seanny123 May 24 '17 at 3:29
  • yep, how to make it oustide given you have shared .so library of tensorflow? – Xyz May 26 '17 at 17:36

If you wish to avoid both building your projects with Bazel and generating a large binary, I have assembled a repository instructing the usage of the TensorFlow C++ library with CMake. You can find it here. The general ideas are as follows:

  • Clone the TensorFlow repository.
  • Add a build rule to tensorflow/BUILD (the provided ones do not include all of the C++ functionality).
  • Build the TensorFlow shared library.
  • Install specific versions of Eigen and Protobuf, or add them as external dependencies.
  • Configure your CMake project to use the TensorFlow library.

First, after installing protobuf and eigen, you'd like to build Tensorflow:

./configure
bazel build //tensorflow:libtensorflow_cc.so

Then Copy the following include headers and dynamic shared library to /usr/local/lib and /usr/local/include:

mkdir /usr/local/include/tf
cp -r bazel-genfiles/ /usr/local/include/tf/
cp -r tensorflow /usr/local/include/tf/
cp -r third_party /usr/local/include/tf/
cp -r bazel-bin/libtensorflow_cc.so /usr/local/lib/

Lastly, compile using an example:

g++ -std=c++11 -o tf_example \
-I/usr/local/include/tf \
-I/usr/local/include/eigen3 \
-g -Wall -D_DEBUG -Wshadow -Wno-sign-compare -w  \
-L/usr/local/lib/libtensorflow_cc \
`pkg-config --cflags --libs protobuf` -ltensorflow_cc tf_example.cpp
  • I believe it is not necessary to install protobuf and eigen. The bazel workspace configuration includes rules to download and build those components. – 4dan Dec 13 '17 at 1:01

You can use this ShellScript to install (most) of it's dependencies, clone, build, compile and get all the necessary files into ../src/includes folder:

https://github.com/node-tensorflow/node-tensorflow/blob/master/tools/install.sh

I use a hack/workaround to avoid having to build the whole TF library myself (which saves both time (it's set up in 3 minutes), disk space, installing dev dependencies, and size of the resulting binary). It's officially unsupported, but works well if you just want to quickly jump in.

Install TF through pip (pip install tensorflow or pip install tensorflow-gpu). Then find its library _pywrap_tensorflow.so (TF 0.* - 1.0) or _pywrap_tensorflow_internal.so (TF 1.1+). In my case (Ubuntu) it's located at /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/tensorflow/python/_pywrap_tensorflow.so. Then create a symlink to this library called lib_pywrap_tensorflow.so somewhere where your build system finds it (e.g. /usr/lib/local). The prefix lib is important! You can also give it another lib*.so name - if you call it libtensorflow.so, you may get better compatibility with other programs written to work with TF.

Then create a C++ project as you are used to (CMake, Make, Bazel, whatever you like).

And then you're ready to just link against this library to have TF available for your projects (and you also have to link against python2.7 libraries)! In CMake, you e.g. just add target_link_libraries(target _pywrap_tensorflow python2.7).

The C++ header files are located around this library, e.g. in /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/tensorflow/include/.

Once again: this way is officially unsupported and you may run in various issues. The library seems to be statically linked against e.g. protobuf, so you may run in odd link-time or run-time issues. But I am able to load a stored graph, restore the weights and run inference, which is IMO the most wanted functionality in C++.

  • I couldn't get this to work. I got a bunch of link time errors about undefined references to python stuff like: undefined reference to 'PyType_IsSubtype' – 0xcaff Jun 1 '17 at 23:01
  • Oh, thanks for pointing it out... You must also link against the python2.7 library... I'll edit the post accordingly. – Martin Pecka Jun 2 '17 at 0:10

If you don't mind using CMake, there is also tensorflow_cc project that builds and installs TF C++ API for you, along with convenient CMake targets you can link against. The project README contains an example and Dockerfiles you can easily follow.

If you are thinking into using Tensorflow c++ api on a standalone package you probably will need tensorflow_cc.so ( There is also a c api version tensorflow.so ) to build the c++ version you can use:

bazel build -c opt //tensorflow:libtensorflow_cc.so

Note1: If you want to add intrinsics support you can add this flags as: --copt=-msse4.2 --copt=-mavx

Note2: If you are thinking into using OpenCV on your project as well, there is an issue when using both libs together (tensorflow issue) and you should use --config=monolithic.

After building the library you need to add it to your project. To do that you can include this paths:

tensorflow
tensorflow/bazel-tensorflow/external/eigen_archive
tensorflow/bazel-tensorflow/external/protobuf_archive/src
tensorflow/bazel-genfiles

And link the library to your project:

tensorflow/bazel-bin/tensorflow/libtensorflow_framework.so (unused if you build with --config=monolithic)
tensorflow/bazel-bin/tensorflow/libtensorflow_cc.so

And when you are building your project you should also specify to your compiler that you are going to use c++11 standards.

Side Note: Paths relative to tensorflow version 1.5 (You may need to check if in your version anything changed).

Also this link helped me a lot into finding all this infos: link

If you don't want to build Tensorflow yourself and your operating system is Debian or Ubuntu, you can download prebuilt packages with the Tensorflow C/C++ libraries. This distribution can be used for C/C++ inference with CPU, GPU support is not included:

https://github.com/kecsap/tensorflow_cpp_packaging/releases

There are instructions written how to freeze a checkpoint in Tensorflow (TFLearn) and load this model for inference with the C/C++ API:

https://github.com/kecsap/tensorflow_cpp_packaging/blob/master/README.md

Beware: I am the developer of this Github project.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.