5

It's code where warning arises:

public async Task<Metadata> GetFolderAsync(string strDirectoryPathName, dynamic varKnownFolder = null)
{
    using (await _FolderPathToInfoMapSync.EnterAsync().ConfigureAwait(false))
    {
        Metadata objFolder;
        string strPathName = strDirectoryPathName;
        if (varKnownFolder == null)
        {
            objFolder = await _Storage.Client.Files.GetMetadataAsync(strPathName);
        }
        else
        {
            //Here warning arises
            if (varKnownFolder != null) _FolderPathToInfoMap.Add(strDirectoryPathName, varKnownFolder);
            else objFolder = null;
        }
    }
    return objFolder;
}

I mean reason for this is a varKnownFolder in method signature, but I don't understand what is wrong here.

2
  • 4
    You get "Expression always true" on varKnownFolder != null because the expression varKnownFolder != null is always true! :)
    – CompuChip
    Nov 10, 2015 at 10:50
  • It's best what I heard forever. Thanks =)
    – ukod
    Nov 10, 2015 at 11:54

4 Answers 4

9

If your code enters the first else block it means that (varKnownFolder == null) was evaluated to false.

So the second check is useless as varKnownFolder could never be null in this block.

public async Task<Metadata> GetFolderAsync(string strDirectoryPathName, dynamic varKnownFolder = null)
{
     using (await _FolderPathToInfoMapSync.EnterAsync().ConfigureAwait(false))
     {
           Metadata objFolder;
           string strPathName = strDirectoryPathName;

           if (varKnownFolder == null)
           {
               // This would happen if varKnownFolder is null 

               objFolder = await _Storage.Client.Files.GetMetadataAsync(strPathName);
           }
           else
           {
               // The code enters HERE BECAUSE varKnownFolder is not null

               if (varKnownFolder != null) // <-- So this check is useless
                   _FolderPathToInfoMap.Add(strDirectoryPathName, varKnownFolder);
               else 
                  objFolder = null;
            }

            return objFolder;
      }

}

Also, it means that you could replace it with this :

public async Task<Metadata> GetFolderAsync(string strDirectoryPathName, dynamic varKnownFolder = null)
{
     using (await _FolderPathToInfoMapSync.EnterAsync().ConfigureAwait(false))
     {
           Metadata objFolder = null;
           string strPathName = strDirectoryPathName;

           if (varKnownFolder == null)
           {
               objFolder = await _Storage.Client.Files.GetMetadataAsync(strPathName);
           }
           else
           {
               // The code enters HERE BECAUSE varKnownFolder is not null
               _FolderPathToInfoMap.Add(strDirectoryPathName, varKnownFolder);
            }

            return objFolder;
      }

}
5
  • Don't you need to initialize objFolder to null in the last code snippet?
    – CompuChip
    Nov 10, 2015 at 12:03
  • objFolder is not readen in this piece of code. So initializing objFolder to null is useless.
    – Perfect28
    Nov 10, 2015 at 12:16
  • It is returned as the result of the function.
    – CompuChip
    Nov 10, 2015 at 12:50
  • Right !! So it should be initialized to null. Edit made. Anyway the scope in the OP is wrong
    – Perfect28
    Nov 10, 2015 at 12:55
  • True. Technically you don't even need the variable, the if could just return await ... and then you can drop the else and return null there. But that's probably partially personal preference so let's stick to the OP's code as closely as possible.
    – CompuChip
    Nov 10, 2015 at 12:58
6

Because you are checking the inverse of the same condition within a block that has already been asserted by the outer if statement. Logically your code is the equivalent of...

if(x==false)
{

}
else // x must be true here
{
    if(x==true) { }
}
3
        if (varKnownFolder == null)
        {
        }
        else
        {
            //You already know it is not null (because of the "if" check)
            if (varKnownFolder != null)
        }

Your "if" statement checks if you have a null object.
Inside your "else", varKnownFolder can't be null.

I mean reason for this is a varKnownFolder in method signature

Nope, the varKnownFolder = null inside method signature just means that, if you call this method without varKnownFolder, it will be null.

3

The compiler is clever and spotted your mistake, then it warned you about it.

 if (varKnownFolder == null)
 {
     // null
 }
 else
 {
     // *** NOT null ***
     if (varKnownFolder != null) _FolderPathToInfoMap.Add(strDirectoryPathName, varKnownFolder);
     else objFolder = null;
}

So what you wrote is equivalent to

  if (varKnownFolder == null)
  {
      objFolder = await _Storage.Client.Files.GetMetadataAsync(strPathName);
  }
  else
  {
      _FolderPathToInfoMap.Add(strDirectoryPathName, varKnownFolder);
  }

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