1

From this StackOverflow thread, I get to know that symbolic links have their own inodes that are different from those of their targets. This can be verified with ls -i. The command will show that a symbolic link and its target have distinct inode numbers. But how things are with hard links? Does creating a hard link create a new inode, or it simply adds an entry in the data of the containing directory without creating any new inode? In other words, does creating a hard link create a real file? Creating a symbolic link certainly does.

2
0

The same method used to show ln -s creates a new inode can be used to verify ln alone does not. Creating a hard link creates a directory entry pointing to the very same inode (here number 26477281).

$ touch foo 
$ ls -li foo
26477281 -rw-r--r-- 1 jlliagre jlliagre 0 Nov 10 21:39 foo
$ ln foo bar
$ ls -li foo bar
26477281 -rw-r--r-- 2 jlliagre jlliagre 0 Nov 10 21:39 bar
26477281 -rw-r--r-- 2 jlliagre jlliagre 0 Nov 10 21:39 foo

Note that the link count was changed from 1 to 2 after the hard link creation.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.