2

We're looking into using node.js to host multiple websites on our web server. Currently, we host everything in IIS, use domain names to differentiate websites, and use URL rewriting to go from HTTP to HTTPS.

From what I've read, nginx seems to be the way to go for hosting multiple node applications on the same server: essentially nginx is the facade that all clients connect to and then it sends the requests to the various node processes depending on the host name.

But what I can't wrap my head around is the SSL part. Node.js provides SSL capabilities, but so does nginx. If nginx hosts the SSL certificate, and listens on 443, and forwards requests to various node.js applications, do the node.js applications also have to be running SSL certificates as well? Is there any security loss by doing it that way? Or is it better to run each node js application using https, and then do http to https inside the node.js application and pass-through all the way back up and out of nginx?

1

do the node.js applications also have to be running SSL certificates as well?

No, the node.js applications can serve cleartext HTTP.

Typically it would be HTTPS from browser/client to nginx and then HTTP from nginx back to the node.js app servers. Thus nginx is both a reverse proxy and a "TLS terminator" in architecture terminology.

Most deployments don't run HTTPS from nginx to their node app servers in the same datacenter/VPC for maintenance overhead and performance reasons, but you certainly could do it if you were concerned about extra security for that hop and you can handle the management of certs etc. But such a setup is pretty rare based on what I've seen.

0

Your best bet would be to let Nginx do the SSL termination. This would mean incoming requests first hit the Nginx instance on port 443 and then Nginx forwards them to the upstream Node.JS servers on port 80, or perhaps some other non-privileged port that your application uses.

In general Node.JS is not great at handling CPU bound tasks. Unfortunately just about any form of crypto is going to be CPU bound which means you will likely see much better benchmarks when moving SSL handling out of Node and onto Nginx. However, if you are concerned about somebody watching your traffic between Nginx and Node you may still want to use SSL on the Node interface.

Here's an Nginx config listening for HTTP and HTTPS requests that acts as a reverse proxy for a Node process, while also supporting websockets. It listens on ports 80 and 443, performs SSL termination on HTTPS requests, and forwards all traffic to port 8000 on the same host.


upstream example {
    # your Node application's host and port belong here
    server 127.0.0.1:8000;
}

server {
    listen 80;
    # all hostnames should be defined here
    server_name example.com www.example.com
    # you may need to create /var/log/nginx
    access_log /var/log/nginx/example.access.log;
    error_log  /var/log/nginx/example.error.log;

    # prevents 502 bad gateway error
    large_client_header_buffers 8 32k;

    location / {

        proxy_next_upstream error timeout invalid_header http_500 http_502 http_503 http_504;

        proxy_set_header Accept-Encoding "";
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
        proxy_set_header X-NginX-Proxy true;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Connection "upgrade";
        proxy_set_header Host $host;

        proxy_buffers 8 32k;
        proxy_buffer_size 64k;

        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme;

        proxy_pass http://example; 
        proxy_redirect off;
    }
}

server {
    listen 443 ssl;
    # all hostnames should be defined here
    server_name example.com www.example.com
    # you may need to create /var/log/nginx
    access_log /var/log/nginx/example.access.log;
    error_log  /var/log/nginx/example.error.log;

    ssl_certificate /path/to/example.com.crt;
    ssl_certificate_key /path/to/example.com.key;

    ssl_protocols TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
    ssl_ciphers RC4:HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5;
    ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
    keepalive_timeout 60;
    ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:10m;
    ssl_session_timeout  10m;

    # prevents 502 bad gateway error
    large_client_header_buffers 8 32k;

    location / {

        proxy_next_upstream error timeout invalid_header http_500 http_502 http_503 http_504;

        proxy_set_header Accept-Encoding "";
        proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
        proxy_set_header X-NginX-Proxy true;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Connection "upgrade";
        proxy_set_header Host $host;

        proxy_buffers 8 32k;
        proxy_buffer_size 64k;

        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme;

        proxy_pass http://example; 
        proxy_redirect off;
    }
}

0

You need to use SSL Certificate in NGINX only. In addition NGINX can be used as load balancer for Node.js servers and it's extremely easy to configure.

Also redirecting all http traffic to https is really easy.

Check following config file from my servers. I add comments and hope it's easy to understand:

http {

    # ......    
    # add proxy, gzip and other http settings here //
    # ......    

    # running node.js servers for nginx proxy - servers are choosen randomly and can be used as load balancers
    # You can add as many servers as you want or just use one, but all servers must be running same script
    # if you want to add servers with different script, just add new upstream and link it to other location in server settings
    upstream example_com {
      server 127.0.0.1:3000;
      server 127.0.0.1:3001;
      keepalive 64;
    }

    # listen http on port 80 and redirect all requested urls to https server
    server {
           listen 80;
           server_name example.com www.example.com;
           return 301 https://$server_name$request_uri;
    }

    # listen https on port 443 and proxy Node.js servers
    server {
        listen 443 ssl;

        # SSL Certificate settings
        ssl_certificate /ssl_cert/location/example.com.bundle.crt;
        ssl_certificate_key /ssl_cert/location/example.com.key;
        ssl_protocols SSLv3 TLSv1;
        ssl_ciphers HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5;

        server_name example.com www.example.com;

        # ......
        # add location, rewrite, error handling, public folders for static files served from directly NGINX and other settings here
        # ......

        # redirect traffic to Node.js servers.
        location / {
          proxy_redirect off;
          # Proxy original headers to Node.js
          # for example if you want to get client IP address from Node.js, there is no way without redirecting headers from NGINX
          proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
          proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
          proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme;
          proxy_set_header Host $http_host;
          proxy_set_header X-NginX-Proxy true;
          proxy_set_header Connection "";
          proxy_http_version 1.1;
          # Add comment (#) to "proxy_cache one;" and "proxy_cache_key sfs$request_uri$scheme;" if you want to serve files more than 2MB from Node.js
          proxy_cache one;
          proxy_cache_key sfs$request_uri$scheme;
          # upstream name with Node.js servers in it
          # no need to install SSL for Node.js, you can use http:// between NGINX and Node.js, all traffic to client will be encrypted by NGINX anyway
          proxy_pass http://example_com;
        }
    }
}

To use multiple apps under same domain use config file above and just add upstream and location for other apps

http {

    # ..........

    upstream example_com {
      server 127.0.0.1:3000;
      server 127.0.0.1:3001;
      keepalive 64;
    }

    upstream example_com_second_app {
      server 127.0.0.1:3002;
      server 127.0.0.1:3003;
      keepalive 64;
    }


    # ..........

    server {

        # ..........

        location / {

          # ..........

          proxy_pass http://example_com;
        }

        location /second_app/ {

          # ..........

          proxy_pass http://example_com_second_app;
        }
    }
}

To use different domains and SSL certificates on same server you can use same config and add another servers with different server_name

http {

    # ..........

    # Configure server for example.com
    server {
           listen 80;
           server_name example.com www.example.com;
           return 301 https://$server_name$request_uri;
    }

    server {
        listen 443 ssl;

        # SSL Certificate settings
        ssl_certificate /ssl_cert/location/example.com.bundle.crt;
        ssl_certificate_key /ssl_cert/location/example.com.key;
        ssl_protocols SSLv3 TLSv1;
        ssl_ciphers HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5;

        server_name example.com www.example.com;

        # ..........     
    }

    # Configure server for my_example.com
    server {
           listen 80;
           server_name my_example.com www.my_example.com;
           return 301 https://$server_name$request_uri;
    }

    server {
        listen 443 ssl;

        # SSL Certificate settings
        ssl_certificate /ssl_cert/location/my_example.com.bundle.crt;
        ssl_certificate_key /ssl_cert/location/my_example.com.key;
        ssl_protocols SSLv3 TLSv1;
        ssl_ciphers HIGH:!aNULL:!MD5;

        server_name my_example.com www.my_example.com;

        # ..........     
    }
}

You even can use same upstream for different domains.

NGINX is really cool, free, fastest and easy to configure :)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.