I'm building a front-end for a search system where almost all user actions need to trigger the same async action to re-fetch search results. For example, if a user enters a keyword, then we need to fetch /api/search?q=foo, and if they later select a category we fetch /api/search?q=foo&categoryId=bar. I originally had separate action types for FETCH_RESULTS, SELECT_CATEGORY, DESELECT_CATEGORY, etc. I created one asynchronous action creator for FETCH_RESULTS, but the others are synchronous. The more I think about it, they all end up needing to re-fetching the results from the backend and update the app state based on the response from the backend.

Would it make sense for me to use the single async action-creator for any change? Or would it be better to use async action creators for each distinct user action (selecting a keyword, category, or filter)?

I think the advantage of granular actions would be the events more accurately reflect what the user did (e.g. the user selected a category) vs having to peer into the payload to figure out what actually changed, but they are all pretty similar.

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is of course something only you can really answer based on what you know about the project. I don't think that there is any inherent advantage to having the actions be more granular, and if there aren't any, its not worth the extra effort. I would have a generic FILTER_CHANGED event and not worry about being able to see what specifically changed--presumably the action isn't going to be complicated, so I'm not going to be debugging the action a lot. As the filter state becomes more complicated and diverse, it might make more sense to break out the actions. By default though, I don't really see much value.

I fully agree with Nathan’s answer.

I just want to add that in order to tell whether actions A and B are really one or two actions, you need to ask yourself: “If I change how some reducers react to A, will I also need to change how they react to B?”

When the handlers change together in the reducer code, it’s likely they should be a single action. When their changes may not affect each other, or if many reducers handle just one of them but not the other, they should probably stay separate.

I agree with Dan Abramov: if the text and categories are highly coupled in your interface, just fire FETCH_RESULTS with the text and categories as action payload.

If the text input and categories selection widget do not share a close parent component, it is complicated to fire a FETCH_RESULTS which contains the text and categories (unless passing a lot of props down the tree...): you then need the action granularity.

One pattern that I have found helpful when such granularity is needed is the Saga / Process manager pattern. I've written a bit about it here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/33501899/82609

Basically, implementing this on redux would mean there's a very special kind of reducer that can trigger side-effects. This reducer is not pure, but do not have the purpose of triggering React renderings, but instead manage coordination of components.

Here's an example of how I would implement your usecase:

function triggerSearchWhenFilterChangesSaga(action,state,dispatch) {
    var newState = searchFiltersReducer(action,state);
    var filtersHaveChanged =  (newState !== state);
    if ( filtersHaveChanged )  {
        triggerSearch(newFiltersState,dispatch)
    }
    return newState;
}


function searchFiltersReducer(action,state = {text: undefined,categories: []}) {
    switch (action.type) {
        case SEARCH_TEXT_CHANGED:
            return Object.assign({}, state, {text: action.text});
            break;
        case CATEGORY_SELECTED:
            return Object.assign({}, state, {categories: state.categories.concat(action.category) });
            break;
        case CATEGORY_UNSELECTED:
            return Object.assign({}, state, {categories: _.without(state.categories,action.category) });
            break;
    }
    return state;
}

Note if you use any time-traveling (record/replay/undo/redo/whatever) debugger, the saga should always be disabled when replaying actions because you don't want new actions to be dispatched during the replay.

EDIT: in Elm language (from which Redux is inspired) we can perform such effects by "reducing" the effects, and then applying them. See that signature: (state, action) -> (state, Effect)

There is also this long discussion on the subjet.

EDIT:

I did not know before but in Redux action creators can access state. So most problems a Saga is supposed to resolve can often be solved in the action creators (but it creates more unnecessary coupling to UI state):

function selectCategory(category) {
  return (dispatch, getState) => {
    dispatch({type: "CategorySelected",payload: category});
    dispatch({type: "SearchTriggered",payload: getState().filters});
  }
}
  • In Redux, we ask people to never cause side effects from reducer. If you want a side effect, add a store.subscribe listener and do it there. – Dan Abramov Nov 20 '15 at 15:09
  • 1
    @DanAbramov I understand your point in maintening this golden rule. But actually the saga pattern needs state, and a reducer is a nice abstraction to compute state over an event log. Basically the saga pattern could be defined as "a reducer that may performs side effect" (and it does not depend on Redux in anycase btw). You can wire this like you want in Redux, including inside store.subscribe – Sebastien Lorber Nov 20 '15 at 15:50
  • This seems very similar to the pattern I settled on to keep url state consistent with the rest of the app state. Actions only directly modify the URL state via redux-router and a store.subscribe function triggers async fetches if the URL state doesn't match the rest of the app state. It doesn't feel like pure Redux, but it handles pageloads and updates gracefully so I think we'll stick with it. – Kevan Ahlquist Nov 20 '15 at 18:31
  • Maybe, a Saga can be implemented as a Redux middleware (so that a side effect is only triggered when state is changed through dispatch())? – Thai Dec 8 '15 at 5:40
  • @Thai check my edits – Sebastien Lorber Dec 8 '15 at 9:34

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