10

So I have a string that I need to split by semicolon's

Email address: "one@tw;,.'o"@hotmail.com;"some;thing"@example.com

Both of the email addresses are valid

So I want to have a List<string> of the following:

  • "one@tw;,.'o"@hotmail.com
  • "some;thing"@example.com

But the way I am currently splitting the addresses is not working:

var addresses = emailAddressString.Split(new[] { ';' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
                .Select(x => x.Trim()).ToList();

Because of the multiple ; characters I end up with invalid email addresses.

I have tried a few different ways, even going down working out if the string contains quotes and then finding the index of the ; characters and working it out that way, but it's a real pain.

Does anyone have any better suggestions?

16
  • 1
    My suggestion would be to make sure that your delimiter character does not show up anywhere else other than to mark the boundary between emails, so emails with ; as part of their name (e.g. "some;[email protected]") should not be allowed. Otherwise, find a different delimiter character, like a pipe |?
    – code_dredd
    Nov 11, 2015 at 13:36
  • 1
    Try the following: (^|;)(.*?)@([\d\w]+[-]*)+\.\w+
    – Camo
    Nov 11, 2015 at 13:39
  • 1
    @ray unfortunatly I need to use a ; character and it is valid inside an email address
    – Jamie Rees
    Nov 11, 2015 at 13:41
  • 1
    @ray Business requirement.
    – Jamie Rees
    Nov 11, 2015 at 13:44
  • 1
    @juharr: I agree with that, but normally outside of email context (e.g. csv files). This is at least the first time I ever see this kind of mess in an email address setting, especially since I thought it'd be pretty straightforward to follow "normal" practices regarding email address formats. E.g. some email clients (e.g. Outlook) use ; to delimit addresses when you're adding recipients, so I probably wouldn't be able to send emails to such "valid" addresses if they were to show up.
    – code_dredd
    Nov 11, 2015 at 13:54

3 Answers 3

13

Assuming that double-quotes are not allowed, except for the opening and closing quotes ahead of the "at" sign @, you can use this regular expression to capture e-mail addresses:

((?:[^@"]+|"[^"]*")@[^;]+)(?:;|$)

The idea is to capture either an unquoted [^@"]+ or a quoted "[^"]*" part prior to @, and then capture everything up to semicolon ; or the end anchor $.

Demo of the regex.

var input = "\"one@tw;,.'o\"@hotmail.com;\"some;thing\"@example.com;hello@world";
var mm = Regex.Matches(input, "((?:[^@\"]+|\"[^\"]*\")@[^;]+)(?:;|$)");
foreach (Match m in mm) {
    Console.WriteLine(m.Groups[1].Value);
}

This code prints

"one@tw;,.'o"@hotmail.com
"some;thing"@example.com
hello@world

Demo 1.

If you would like to allow escaped double-quotes inside double-quotes, you could use a more complex expression:

((?:(?:[^@\"]|(?<=\\)\")+|\"([^\"]|(?<=\\)\")*\")@[^;]+)(?:;|$)

Everything else remains the same.

Demo 2.

3
  • What if double-quotes are allowed?
    – Jamie Rees
    Nov 11, 2015 at 14:09
  • @JamieR It depends on the rules of allowing extra double-quotes. If extra double-quotes are allowed inside quoted strings, but they must be escaped, then this part "[^"]*" of the regex would become a lot trickier, but still workable. Allowing unrestricted double-quotes everywhere would be ambiguous. Nov 11, 2015 at 14:13
  • 1
    @JamieR Here is a demo of an expression that allows escaped quotes inside or outside quoted strings. Note that you need to un-escape these quotes in you code, because they are transferred to the output unchanged. Nov 11, 2015 at 14:19
4

I obviously started writing my anti regex method at around the same time as juharr (Another answer). I thought that since I already have it written I would submit it.

    public static IEnumerable<string> SplitEmailsByDelimiter(string input, char delimiter)
    {
        var startIndex = 0;
        var delimiterIndex = 0;

        while (delimiterIndex >= 0)
        {
            delimiterIndex = input.IndexOf(';', startIndex);
            string substring = input;
            if (delimiterIndex > 0)
            {
                substring = input.Substring(0, delimiterIndex);
            }

            if (!substring.Contains("\"") || substring.IndexOf("\"") != substring.LastIndexOf("\""))
            {
                yield return substring;
                input = input.Substring(delimiterIndex + 1);
                startIndex = 0;
            }
            else
            {
                startIndex = delimiterIndex + 1;
            }
        }
    }

Then the following

            var input = "[email protected];\"one@tw;,.'o\"@hotmail.com;\"some;thing\"@example.com;hello@world;[email protected];";
            foreach (var email in SplitEmailsByDelimiter(input, ';'))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(email);
            }

Would give this output

[email protected]
"one@tw;,.'o"@hotmail.com
"some;thing"@example.com
hello@world
[email protected]
3

You can also do this without using regular expressions. The following extension method will allow you to specify a delimiter character and a character to begin and end escape sequences. Note it does not validate that all escape sequences are closed.

public static IEnumerable<string> SpecialSplit(
    this string str, char delimiter, char beginEndEscape)
{
    int beginIndex = 0;
    int length = 0;
    bool escaped = false;
    foreach (char c in str)
    {
        if (c == beginEndEscape)
        {
            escaped = !escaped;
        }
            
        if (!escaped && c == delimiter)
        {
            yield return str.Substring(beginIndex, length);
            beginIndex += length + 1;
            length = 0;
            continue;
        }

        length++;
    }

    yield return str.Substring(beginIndex, length);
}

Then the following

var input = "\"one@tw;,.'o\"@hotmail.com;\"some;thing\"@example.com;hello@world;\"D;D@blah;blah.com\"";
foreach (var address in input.SpecialSplit(';', '"')) 
    Console.WriteLine(v);

While give this output

"one@tw;,.'o"@hotmail.com

"some;thing"@example.com

hello@world

"D;D@blah;blah.com"

Here's the version that works with an additional single escape character. It assumes that two consecutive escape characters should become one single escape character and it's escaping both the beginEndEscape charter so it will not trigger the beginning or end of an escape sequence and it also escapes the delimiter. Anything else that comes after the escape character will be left as is with the escape character removed.

public static IEnumerable<string> SpecialSplit(
    this string str, char delimiter, char beginEndEscape, char singleEscape)
{
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    bool escapedSequence = false;
    bool previousEscapeChar = false;
    foreach (char c in str)
    {
        if (c == singleEscape && !previousEscapeChar)
        {
            previousEscapeChar = true;
            continue;
        }

        if (c == beginEndEscape && !previousEscapeChar)
        {
            escapedSequence = !escapedSequence;
        }

        if (!escapedSequence && !previousEscapeChar && c == delimiter)
        {
            yield return builder.ToString();
            builder.Clear();
            continue;
        }

        builder.Append(c);
        previousEscapeChar = false;
    }

    yield return builder.ToString();
}

Finally you probably should add null checking for the string that is passed in and note that both will return a sequence with one empty string if you pass in an empty string.

3
  • What if inside the " there is another " e.g. "very.(),:;<>[]\".VERY.\"very@\\ \"very\".unusual"@strange.example.com
    – Jamie Rees
    Nov 11, 2015 at 14:17
  • In that case you also need to tell it that there's an escape character for the double quote. Also you have to then think about what can and cannot be escaped. Presumeable "\\" will give you a single backslash, but what about "\t". Do you want a tab or just a single t?
    – juharr
    Nov 11, 2015 at 14:20
  • 3
    Also I'd probably abandon using string.Substring and instead use a StringBuilder to add characters as I loop through the data.
    – juharr
    Nov 11, 2015 at 14:26

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