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I am working on Win7 using VS2010 with a code base that makes heavy use of the Qt 5.1.1 framework, and we have set our compilation warning level to 4 so that we can catch as many or our own issues as possible. We are using the free version of Qt, so I suppose maybe that's where the problem lies, but we are getting loads of warnings from the included Qt headers.

I created two header files, one with the following:

// header file 1
#pragma warning(push)
#pragma warning(disable: 4091)
#pragma warning(disable: 4127)
#pragma warning(disable: 4231)
#pragma warning(disable: 4244)
#pragma warning(disable: 4251)
#pragma warning(disable: 4481)
#pragma warning(disable: 4512)
#pragma warning(disable: 4718)
#pragma warning(disable: 4800)

and the other with the following:

// header file 2
#pragma warning(pop)

And then around every include of a Qt header file or group of Qt header files in the code, I preceded that by including header file 1, and then after the last Qt header I ended it by including header file 2. This worked very well in a small project in the solution, but for one of the large projects, I am still getting very many warnings for codes that I have disabled in my header file 1.

I had a suspicion and did a grep through the whole Qt source tree and found that there are some headers that themselves do pragma warning push/pops. Some of these do this in the middle of the code, and I am starting to wonder whether my push is closed by their pop.

My question is, is it the case that a #pragma warning(push) directive can be nested, as with a #ifdef? In other words, just as I can do:

#ifdef DEF1
#ifdef DEF2
<dosomething>
#endif // for DEF2
#endif // for DEF1

Is it possible to do the following:

// outer layer - my cpp file about to include a Qt header
#pragma warning(push)
#pragma warning(disable: 4091)

// inner layer - included Qt header file pushes and pops and then continues with more code
#pragma warning(push)
#pragma warning(disable: 2403)
<some code that actually uses this stuff>
#pragma warning(pop)

// back to outer layer - my file after the Qt header include
#pragma warning(pop)

Or does the first pop actually pop both? I would have thought that it would nest, since it is supposed to push onto a stack, but can't figure out another reason why I am still seeing these Qt warnings. The Qt warnings themselves are referencing Qt files, like this one does:

6>c:\qt\qt5.1.1\5.1.1\msvc2010\include\qtcore\qhash.h(72): warning C4127: conditional expression is constant

Any ideas on this? I have looked around for nested pragma warning push/pop, but see no one talking about it, and the following MSDN page on warning doesn't say anything:

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2c8f766e.aspx

Very important this gets cleaned up, because the real goal is to start dealing with out in-house warnings that have been overlooked because of the deluge of Qt warnings.

0

Using a simple MCVE:

void test()
{
#pragma warning( push )
#pragma warning( disable : 4305 ) // 'initializing' : truncation from 'double' to 'float'

#pragma warning( push )
#pragma warning( disable : 4244 ) // conversion from 'double' to 'float', possible loss of data
    {
        float f;
        double d = 21.0;
        f = d;  // warning C4244 : '=' : conversion from 'double' to 'float', possible loss of data
    }
#pragma warning( pop )

    {
        float ff = 1.02;  // warning C4305: 'initializing' : truncation from 'double' to 'float'
    }
#pragma warning( pop )

}

and compiled with Visual Studio 2013 (I haven't checked any others) results in zero warnings. This would indicate that (at least naïvely) nested pop/pushes works as expected. Depending on the external libraries, they may actually enable disabled warnings warning if it's done with disable/default pairs (instead of push/pop pairs):

void test()
{
#pragma warning( push )
#pragma warning( disable : 4305 ) // 'initializing' : truncation from 'double' to 'float'

#pragma warning( disable : 4244 ) // conversion from 'double' to 'float', possible loss of data
#pragma warning( disable : 4305 ) // 'initializing' : truncation from 'double' to 'float'
    {
        float f;
        double d = 21.0;
        f = d;  // warning C4244 : '=' : conversion from 'double' to 'float', possible loss of data
        f = 1.02;  // warning C4305: 'initializing' : truncation from 'double' to 'float'
    }
#pragma warning( default : 4244 ) // conversion from 'double' to 'float', possible loss of data
#pragma warning( default : 4305 ) // 'initializing' : truncation from 'double' to 'float'

    {
        // In this case, the following line results in a warning,
        // despite the #pragma warning( disable : 4305 ) line above
        float ff = 1.02;  // warning C4305: 'initializing' : truncation from 'double' to 'float'
    }
#pragma warning( pop )

}

In this case, we get a warning at the float ff = 1.02; line, despite the #pragma warning( disable : 4305 ) line at the top. What you can do to turn off all compiler warnings (so that the default becomes off) would be to replace your

#pragma warning( push )
#pragma warning( disable : 123456789 )
// included external code you don't want to hear about
#pragma warning( pop )

with

#pragma warning( push, 0 )
// included external code you don't want to hear about
#pragma warning( pop )

which will result in no compiler warnings (linker warnings not included).

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