42

I know the rule-of-thumb to read declarations right-to-left and I was fairly sure I knew what was going on until a colleague told me that:

const MyStructure** ppMyStruct;

means "ppMyStruct is a pointer to a const pointer to a (mutable) MyStructure" (in C++).

I would have thought it meant "ppMyStruct is a pointer to a pointer to a const MyStructure". I looked for an answer in the C++ spec, but apparently I'm not very good at that...

What does in mean in C++, and does it mean the same thing in C?

0

7 Answers 7

67

Your colleague is wrong. That is a (non-const) pointer to a (non-const) pointer to a const MyStructure. In both C and C++.

4
  • 7
    It's also part of the reason you will sometimes see the alternative "spelling recommended: MyStructure const * *ppMyStruct; Then you can read right-to-left: pointer to pointer to const Mystructure. Commented Dec 3, 2008 at 14:00
  • Who reads RTL? Surely none of my customers :-) I think we don't need RTL support, do we?
    – dom0
    Commented Jul 27, 2013 at 19:14
  • This is an old post so probably my comment-qustion will not be answered : How to create a const pointer to a const pointer to a const MyStructure?
    – tchronis
    Commented Jan 31, 2015 at 15:22
  • 1
    @tchronis, I haven't tested (only that it compiles), but try something like: MyStructure const * const * const ptrMyStr;
    – Javier Mr
    Commented Apr 28, 2015 at 7:01
65

In such cases the tool cdecl (or c++decl) can be helpfull:

     [flolo@titan ~]$ cdecl explain "const struct s** ppMyStruct"
     declare ppMyStruct as pointer to pointer to const struct s
5
  • 1
    Very useful. Why isn't this tool well-known?
    – David Holm
    Commented Dec 3, 2008 at 10:59
  • Do you happen to know if it's available for windows?
    – Niklas
    Commented Dec 3, 2008 at 11:03
  • It is open source and afaik it doesnt have any specific requirements to the OS. When lucky it should be compileable with any compiler, in worst case you have to use the gcc/cygwin or mingw stuff.
    – flolo
    Commented Dec 3, 2008 at 11:13
  • @flolo you are a hero! I have never heard of that tool! Thank you for sharing it! +1
    – DJJ
    Commented Mar 6, 2020 at 3:01
  • Online version at cdecl.org Works the other way round too! Enter the English, get the code.
    – Ant
    Commented Jun 29, 2020 at 10:21
24

You were right in your interpretation. Here's another way to look at it:

const MyStructure *      *ppMyStruct;        // ptr --> ptr --> const MyStructure
      MyStructure *const *ppMyStruct;        // ptr --> const ptr --> MyStructure
      MyStructure *      *const ppMyStruct;  // const ptr --> ptr --> MyStructure

These are all the alternatives of a pointer-to-pointer with one const qualifier. The right-to-left rule can be used to decipher the declarations (at least in C++; I'm no C expert).

2
  • What about MyStructure const* *ppMyStruct;?
    – tobi
    Commented Jan 19, 2013 at 20:56
  • 2
    @tobi, that's the same as the first line. See stackoverflow.com/q/3694630 (they talk about references, but pointers behave the same).
    – efotinis
    Commented Jan 20, 2013 at 15:35
7

Your colleague is wrong, and it's the same for C and C++. Try the following:

typedef struct foo_t {
    int i;
} foo_t;

int main()
{
    foo_t f = {123};
    const foo_t *p = &f;
    const foo_t **pp = &p;
    printf("f.i = %d\n", (*pp)->i);
    (*pp)->i = 888; // error
    p->i = 999;     // error
}

Visual C++ 2008 gives the following errors for the last two lines:

error C2166: l-value specifies const object
error C2166: l-value specifies const object

GCC 4 says:

error: assignment of read-only location '**pp'
error: assignment of read-only location '*p'

G++ 4 says:

error: assignment of data-member 'foo_t::i' in read-only structure
error: assignment of data-member 'foo_t::i' in read-only structure
2
  • Why is this downvoted? I just thought it was better to give a specific example, instead of just telling him that he is right.
    – csl
    Commented Dec 3, 2008 at 10:01
  • guess it was a Visual C++ hater, GNU C++ lover :-)
    – dmityugov
    Commented Dec 3, 2008 at 10:28
5

You are right.

Another answer already pointed to the "Clockwise Spiral Rule". I liked that one very much - a little elaborate, though.

3

As a corollary to the other comments, don't put 'const' first. It really belongs after the type. That would have clarified the meaning immediately, just read it RTL as usual:

MyStructure const** ppMyStruct;
2
  • 2
    I fail to see how that makes it clearer, but I suppose it's a matter of habit. If the const comes first, I find it just as easy to read it RTL as "a pointer to a pointer to a MyStructure which is const".
    – Niklas
    Commented Dec 9, 2008 at 11:42
  • when i tried it i got this cdecl> explain struct MyStructure const** ppMyStruct; syntax error Can any one explain why if this is a right form C declaration
    – prajul
    Commented May 22, 2012 at 16:33
0
void Foo( int       *       ptr,
          int const *       ptrToConst,
          int       * const constPtr,
          int const * const constPtrToConst )
{
    *ptr = 0; // OK: modifies the pointee
    ptr  = 0; // OK: modifies the pointer

    *ptrToConst = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the pointee
    ptrToConst  = 0; // OK: modifies the pointer

    *constPtr = 0; // OK: modifies the pointee
    constPtr  = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the pointer

    *constPtrToConst = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the pointee
    constPtrToConst  = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the pointer
}
1
  • I don't see how this is an answer to the question. Did you misread it?
    – Niklas
    Commented Feb 6, 2010 at 8:14

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