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I know that the data contained in an OpenCV matrix is not guaranteed to be continuous. To make myself clear, here is a paragraph from Opencv documentation:

enter image description here

OpenCV provides a function called isContinuous() to test if the data of a given matrix is continuous. My questions are

  1. If I create a new matrix as follows
cv::Mat img = cv::imread(img_name)

Is the data in img guaranteed to be continuous?

  1. I know that creating a new matrix by borrowing data from the existing matrix would result in discontinuous data
cv::Mat small_mat = large_mat.col(0);

The above code creates a new matrix small_mat by borrowing the 0th column of large_mat, leading to discontinuous data in small_mat. So the question is if I create a brand new matrix without borrowing data from the existing matrix, will the brand new matrix have continuous data or discontinuous data?

  1. Is the following code guaranteed to create a matrix with continuous data?
cv::Mat mat(nRows, nCols, CV_32FC1);
1
  • I guess it is not guaranteed to be continuous if you use things like IPP with odd image dimensions. So it might depend on your speicific OpenCV build.
    – Micka
    Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 9:45

3 Answers 3

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You can see in the OpenCV doc for isContinuous:

The method returns true if the matrix elements are stored continuously without gaps at the end of each row. Otherwise, it returns false. Obviously, 1x1 or 1xN matrices are always continuous. Matrices created with Mat::create() are always continuous. But if you extract a part of the matrix using Mat::col(), Mat::diag() , and so on, or constructed a matrix header for externally allocated data, such matrices may no longer have this property.

So, as long as you are creating a new matrix (i.e. you're calling create), your matrix will be continuous.

create works like:

  1. If the current array shape and the type match the new ones, return immediately. Otherwise, de-reference the previous data by calling Mat::release().
  2. Initialize the new header.
  3. Allocate the new data of total()*elemSize() bytes.
  4. Allocate the new, associated with the data, reference counter and set it to 1.

This means that when you (implicitly) call create, the matrix will be continuous (step 3).


Your questions

If I create a new matrix with imread is the data guaranteed to be continuous

Yes, because imread internally calls create.

I know that creating a new matrix by borrowing data from existing matrix would result in incontinuous data.

Correct, data will be non continuous. To make the new matrix continuous, you can call clone(), which calls create to create the new matrix.

if I create a brand new matrix without borrowing data from existing matrix, will the brand new matrix have incontinuous data?

Yes, the constructor internally calls create.

Matrix constructor is guaranteed to create a matrix with continuous data?

Yes, the constructor internally calls create.

This is a small example to summarize:

#include <opencv2\opencv.hpp>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
using namespace cv;

int main()
{
    // Read image
    Mat img = imread("path_to_image");
    cout << "img is continuous? " << img.isContinuous() << endl; 
    // Yes, calls create internally

    // Constructed a matrix header for externally allocated data
    Mat small_mat = img.col(0);
    cout << "small_mat is continuous? " << small_mat.isContinuous() << endl; 
    // No, you're just creating a new header.

    // Matrix (self) expression
    small_mat = small_mat + 2;
    cout << "small_mat is continuous? " << small_mat.isContinuous() << endl; 
    // No, you're not even creating a new header

    // Matrix expression
    Mat expr = small_mat + 2;
    cout << "expr is continuous? " << expr.isContinuous() << endl; 
    // Yes, you're creating a new matrix

    // Clone
    Mat small_mat_cloned = img.col(0).clone();
    cout << "small_mat_cloned is continuous? " << small_mat_cloned.isContinuous() << endl; 
    // Yes, you're creating a new matrix

    // Create
    Mat mat(10, 10, CV_32FC1);
    cout << "mat is continuous? " << mat.isContinuous() << endl; 
    // Yes, you're creating a new matrix

    return 0;
}
5

Data stored in OpenCV cv::Mats are not always continuous in memory, which can be verified via API Mat::isContinuous(). Instead, it follows the following rules:

  1. Matrices created by imread(), clone(), or a constructor will always be continuous.
  2. The only time a matrix will not be continuous is when it borrows data from an existing matrix (i.e. created out of an ROI of a big mat), with the exception that the data borrowed is continuous in the big matrix, including
    • borrow a single row;
    • borrow multiple rows but with full original width.

The following code from my blog demonstrates this in a better way (see the inline comments for further explanation).

std::vector<cv::Mat> mats(7);

// continuous as created using constructor
mats[0] = cv::Mat::ones(1000, 800, CV_32FC3);      

// NOT continuous as borrowed data is not continuous (multiple rows and not full original width)
mats[1] = mats[0](cv::Rect(100, 100, 300, 200));     

// continuous as created using clone()
mats[2] = mats[1].clone();               

// continuous for single row always    
mats[3] = mats[2].row(10);             

// NOT continuous as borrowed data is not continuous (multiple rows and not full original width)         
mats[4] = mats[2](cv::Rect(5, 5, 100, 2));     

// continuous as borrowed data is continuous (multiple rows with full original width)   
mats[5] = mats[2](cv::Rect(0, 5, mats[2].cols, 2));

// NOT continuous as borrowed data is not continuous (multiple rows and not full original width) 
mats[6] = mats[2].col(10);                            
4

When you create a Mat with Mat::create, it is continuous. Such operation like explicitly Mat::create, or implicitly Mat::clone, Mat::Mat(...).

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