9

I am working on a website in which the database is huge. 1 million records are in the table at the time. When I perform a query then it takes too much time to execute. One sample query is given below:

select * from `ratings` order by id limit 499500, 500

Every query takes more than one minute, but when I drop the table to 10 thousand records then this query executes fastly.

As I have read that there is not problem for 1 million records in a table because in database tables, there is not problem of big records.

I have used indexing of id in the table by the help of Stack Overflow question How do I add indices to MySQL tables?, but still I got the same problem.

*** I am using CodeIgniter for the project.

12
  • 3
    Do you use indexes in your table? Also, 1M records is not that big for MySQL. – D4V1D Nov 12 '15 at 7:17
  • table has three columns ranking_id, id and website.... i have not concept of indexing... but there should not be a problem for 1M records – M Razwan Nov 12 '15 at 7:19
  • 1
    indexes in place? You are bringing back 500 rows, not 1M (or half that) – Drew Nov 12 '15 at 7:19
  • 1
    Can you give a snapshot of the execution plan of the query. That should be helpful for all of us. – Abhay Chauhan Nov 12 '15 at 7:26
  • 4
    SELECT * is a problem, ORDER BY LIMIT X ,y can only be accomplished by a scan,it has to get all the rows before ordering them – Mihai Nov 12 '15 at 7:46
15

Note, this is not suggesting for a minute to use MyISAM. I use that only to get my ids, min,max, and count to line up. So ignore the engine, please.

create table ratings
(   id int auto_increment primary key,
    thing int null
)engine=MyISAM;
insert ratings (thing) values (null),(null),(null),(null),(null),(null),(null),(null),(null);
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;

insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;

insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;
insert ratings (thing) select thing from ratings;

I now have 4.7M rows

select count(*),min(id),max(id) from ratings;
+----------+---------+---------+
| count(*) | min(id) | max(id) |
+----------+---------+---------+
|  4718592 |       1 | 4718592 |
+----------+---------+---------+
select * from `ratings` order by id limit 499500, 500;
-- 1 second on a dumpy laptop

.

explain select * from `ratings` order by id limit 499500, 500;
+----+-------------+---------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+---------+----------------+
| id | select_type | table   | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows    | Extra          |
+----+-------------+---------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+---------+----------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ratings | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 4718592 | Using filesort |
+----+-------------+---------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+---------+----------------+

.

explain select * from `ratings` where id>=499501 limit 500;
+----+-------------+---------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+---------+-----------------------+
| id | select_type | table   | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows    | Extra                 |
+----+-------------+---------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+---------+-----------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | ratings | range | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL | 4198581 | Using index condition |
+----+-------------+---------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+---------+-----------------------+

Moral of the story may be to use a where clause.

One cannot rule out the possibility of a deadlock.

5
  • 1
    Thanks. by where condition and order by, its working. – M Razwan Nov 12 '15 at 7:52
  • ">=" only works if there are no gaps in the ids! (And, yes, InnoDB and MyISAM should work similarly for this case.) – Rick James Sep 5 '16 at 19:19
  • @RickJames the engine was chosen because innodb would have caused range allocation gaps during the self-inserts – Drew Sep 5 '16 at 19:21
  • One can always mess with the innodb mode like here but I basically wasn't up for it at the moment. – Drew Sep 5 '16 at 19:27
  • or an ALTER TABLE table_name ENGINE=InnoDB; – Drew Sep 5 '16 at 19:28
1

Start with checking the execution plan of the query to identify the bottleneck and create indexes if required. I think you should atleast have a index on Id column.

There are many factors which can also affect your query performance:

  1. Fragmentation of Data pages
  2. Statistics of table not updated
  3. Many request running in parallel

and many more....

Follow the below links to get the execution plan and to identify the performance degrading factors: http://www.sitepoint.com/using-explain-to-write-better-mysql-queries/

How to optimise MySQL queries based on EXPLAIN plan

Let me know if you face any troubles.

1

Checklist:

  • Created clustered index (index) on 'id' column order by ASC
  • Check your query time from command line, see this
  • Check your PHP code (I see you using CodeIgniter). About your algorithm: Did you use the CodeIgniter database library see this?
    If you are using a raw query, check your loop.

Alternative way is to try a query using to an active index:

select * from `ratings` where id>=456789 limit 500;
0

Check for indexing. There should be a primary key in each table and there may attributes in your where clause of your query that are not part of the primary index or of a clustered index.

1
  • 1
    I am not using where condition in the query. – M Razwan Nov 12 '15 at 7:26
-1

Here is the link of Tuts-plus which will help you to solve your problem .

Most Probable solution is indexing the database and instead of (*) use column names Better way to Query

-1

If you are using the InnoDB engine for your table, change it to MyISAM. It is faster for read operations. When to use MyISAM and InnoDB.

In addition, if you have queries with search criteria, make sure frequently used column are indexed.

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