-3

With the release of a new PHP version, PHP 7, new features are introduced. among these new features is an operator I am not familiar with. The Null coalesce operator.

What is this operator and what are some good use cases?

closed as off-topic by Mitch Wheat, u_mulder, D4V1D, Matteo Tassinari, Sulthan Allaudeen Nov 12 '15 at 11:13

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – Mitch Wheat, u_mulder, D4V1D, Matteo Tassinari, Sulthan Allaudeen
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    From the manual: "The null coalesce operator (??) has been added as syntactic sugar for the common case of needing to use a ternary in conjunction with isset(). It returns its first operand if it exists and is not NULL; otherwise it returns its second operand." – D4V1D Nov 12 '15 at 7:29
4

You can use it to init a variable that might be null

The ?? operator is called the null-coalescing operator. It returns the left-hand operand if the operand is not null; otherwise it returns the right hand operand.

Source: https://msdn.microsoft.com/nl-nl/library/ms173224.aspx

(not dependent on language)

Use case

You can write

$rabbits;

$rabbits = count($somearray);

if ($rabbits == null) {
    $rabbits = 0;
}

You can use the shorter notation

$rabbits = $rabbits ?? 0;
1

According to the PHP Manual:

The null coalesce operator (??) has been added as syntactic sugar for the common case of needing to use a ternary in conjunction with isset(). It returns its first operand if it exists and is not NULL; otherwise it returns its second operand.

// Fetches the value of $_GET['user'] and returns 'nobody'
// if it does not exist.
$username = $_GET['user'] ?? 'nobody';
// This is equivalent to:
$username = isset($_GET['user']) ? $_GET['user'] : 'nobody';

// Coalesces can be chained: this will return the first
// defined value out of $_GET['user'], $_POST['user'], and
// 'nobody'.
$username = $_GET['user'] ?? $_POST['user'] ?? 'nobody';
0
$username = $_GET['user'] ?? 'nobody'; 

is same as

$username = isset($_GET['user']) ? $_GET['user'] : 'nobody';

?? is ternary shorthand

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.