7

I would like to know if there is a way to let the program continue after an exception is thrown. For example:

Try
  line 1
  line 2
  line 3
  line 4 ( here the exception is thrown and jumps to the catch)
  line 5  <-- i would like the program to continue its execution loging the error
  line 6  

Catch ex as Exception
   log(ex.tostring)
End Try

Thanks.

11

If you're doing something that you know how to recover from or that isn't vital, you're supposed to wrap just that line in the try/catch with a specific catch. e.g.

Try 
  line 1
  line 2
  line 3
  Try
     line 4 ( here the exception is throw and jumps to the catch)
  Catch iox as IOException ' or whatever type is being thrown
     'log it
  End Try
  line 5  <-- i would like the program to continue its execution after loggin the error
  line 6  

Catch ex as Exception
   log(ex.tostring)
End Try
6

Use 'Continue For'

Not good practice everywhere, but useful in some circumstances, e.g. find a file while handling denied access to certain directories:

    Dim dir As New DirectoryInfo("C:\")
    Dim strSearch As String = ("boot.ini")

    For Each SubDir As DirectoryInfo In dir.GetDirectories
        Try
            For Each File As FileInfo In SubDir.GetFiles
                Console.WriteLine("Sub Directory: {0}", SubDir.Name)
                If File.Name = strSearch Then
                    Console.Write(File.FullName)
                End If
            Next
        Catch ex As Exception
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message)
            Continue For
        End Try
    Next
  • I believe this is redundant. The_TryCatch is inside the for loop, so after the exception is handled, you'll hit End Try, then you'll hit Next anyway. The only time this is useful is if you DON'T want to continue the ForLoop , then you would use EXIT FOR to step out of the loop. – NapkinBob Apr 25 '18 at 14:16
3

Although On Error Resume Next is still available in VB.NET, it is mutually exclusive to the preferred method of structured exception handling.

Instead, I would recommend the use of the Finally clause of a Try..Catch..Finally block to ensure Line 5 and Line 6 get executed even if Line 4 (or any preceding Line) throws.

Try
  line 1
  line 2
  line 3
  line 4
Catch ex as Exception
   log(ex.tostring)
Finally
  line 5
  line 6  
End Try
  • In this case the exception is couse by a dbnullconversion to int after reading from a dB ... but this was just one data of many others, and is why i wanted to keep reading .. Thanks !! for the comments ! – carlos Jul 29 '10 at 20:35
1
try 
  line 1
catch ex as exception
   log(ex.tostring)
end try
try
  line 2
catch ex as exception
   log(ex.tostring)
end try
try
  line 3
catch ex as exception
   log(ex.tostring)
end try
try
  line 4 ( here the exception is throw and jumps to the catch)
catch ex as exception
   log(ex.tostring)
end try
try
  line 5  <-- i would like the program to continue its execution after loggin the error
catch ex as exception
   log(ex.tostring)
end try
try
  line 6  
catch ex as exception
end try
  • 8
    Did you feel the need to take a shower after typing that? :) – Jay Riggs Jul 29 '10 at 20:28
  • aww...you beat me to it :) and if you didn't feel like creating all the try-catch blocks there's always the dreaded goto statement. But I wouldn't suggest that! – Ashley Grenon Jul 29 '10 at 20:30
  • uff well it seems like it is the only way to go .. thanks – carlos Jul 29 '10 at 20:36
  • @carlos: as opposed to what? How else can this be done? – S.Lott Jul 29 '10 at 20:48
0

VB.net does not support this type of construct. Once the exception unwinds the stack, it can't be unwound back again. Some languages do permit you to resume the exception, but they require more sophisticated stack management – essentially coroutines.

0

If I am not mistaken the "Best Practices for Handling Exceptions" says if you can check for an error that will likely occur then check for that condition. If you can check for dbnull then do so.

0

Here is an example in code:

Sub yourSub()
  Dim cDelegate As CatchDelegate = Sub(ex As Exception)
                                       Your Catch Code
                                   End Sub
 line 1
 line 2
 line 3
 TCResumeNext(Sub() line 4, cDelegate)
 line 5
 line 6
End Sub

Delegate Sub CatchDelegate(e As Exception)

Sub TCResumeNext(tryDelegate As [Delegate], catchDelgate As CatchDelegate)
   Try
     tryDelegate.DynamicInvoke()
   Catch ex As Exception
      catchDelgate.DynamicInvoke(ex)
   End Try
End Sub
0

In VB.NET you can use VISUAL BASIC 6.0 Code:

PRIVATE SUB PROCESO
ON ERROR GOTO VERERROR:
10: line1
20: line2 
30: line3
EXIT SUB
VERERROR:
MSGBOX("ERROR " & ERR.NUM & "." & ERR.DESCRIPTION)
RESUME NEXT 
'RESUME FOR RETRY
END SUB 

And you can use ERL() for view err line writer before of code '10:' (o no write this numbers/labels)

-1

quite an old post but for the sake of others . personally i would use "on error resume next" in this case it is a necessary evil

  • 1
    No professional developer would ever use 'on error resume next' in any situation. Once you use this ALL error are simply ignored..... Roughly translated it mean, 'I've got an error and I don't care'.... – Monty Mar 15 '16 at 21:08

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