10

Python NLTK has cmudict that spits out phonemes of recognized words. For example 'see' -> [u'S', u'IY1'], but for words that are not recognized it gives an error. For example 'seasee' -> error.

import nltk

arpabet = nltk.corpus.cmudict.dict()

for word in ('s', 'see', 'sea', 'compute', 'comput', 'seesea'):
    try:
        print arpabet[word][0]
    except Exception as e:
        print e

#Output
[u'EH1', u'S']
[u'S', u'IY1']
[u'S', u'IY1']
[u'K', u'AH0', u'M', u'P', u'Y', u'UW1', u'T']
'comput'
'seesea'

Is any there any module that doesn't have that limitation but able to find/guess phonemes of any real or made-up words?

If there is none, is there any way I can program it out? I am thinking about doing loops to test increasing portion of the word. For example in 'seasee', the first loop takes "s", next loop takes 'se', and third takes 'sea'... etc and run the cmudict. Though the problem is I don't know how to signal it's the right phoneme to consider. For example, both 's' and 'sea' in 'seasee' will output some valid phonemes.

Working progress:

import nltk

arpabet = nltk.corpus.cmudict.dict()

for word in ('s', 'see', 'sea', 'compute', 'comput', 'seesea', 'darfasasawwa'):
    try:
        phone = arpabet[word][0]
    except:
        try:
            counter = 0
            for i in word:
                substring = word[0:1+counter]
                counter += 1
                try:
                    print substring, arpabet[substring][0]
                except Exception as e:
                    print e
        except Exception as e:
            print e

#Output
c [u'S', u'IY1']
co [u'K', u'OW1']
com [u'K', u'AA1', u'M']
comp [u'K', u'AA1', u'M', u'P']
compu [u'K', u'AA1', u'M', u'P', u'Y', u'UW0']
comput 'comput'
s [u'EH1', u'S']
se [u'S', u'AW2', u'TH', u'IY1', u'S', u'T']
see [u'S', u'IY1']
sees [u'S', u'IY1', u'Z']
seese [u'S', u'IY1', u'Z']
seesea 'seesea'
d [u'D', u'IY1']
da [u'D', u'AA1']
dar [u'D', u'AA1', u'R']
darf 'darf'
darfa 'darfa'
darfas 'darfas'
darfasa 'darfasa'
darfasas 'darfasas'
darfasasa 'darfasasa'
darfasasaw 'darfasasaw'
darfasasaww 'darfasasaww'
darfasasawwa 'darfasasawwa'
6

I encountered the same issue, and I solved it by partitioning unknown recursively (see wordbreak)

import nltk
from functools import lru_cache
from itertools import product as iterprod

try:
    arpabet = nltk.corpus.cmudict.dict()
except LookupError:
    nltk.download('cmudict')
    arpabet = nltk.corpus.cmudict.dict()

@lru_cache()
def wordbreak(s):
    s = s.lower()
    if s in arpabet:
        return arpabet[s]
    middle = len(s)/2
    partition = sorted(list(range(len(s))), key=lambda x: (x-middle)**2-x)
    for i in partition:
        pre, suf = (s[:i], s[i:])
        if pre in arpabet and wordbreak(suf) is not None:
            return [x+y for x,y in iterprod(arpabet[pre], wordbreak(suf))]
    return None
2
  • Recursion on the word boundaries
    – Uri Goren
    Apr 13 '20 at 3:47
  • Best answer, thank you. Also helps to merge the output into a single list: phonemes = list(itertools.chain.fromiterable(wordbreak(word)))
    – deepdreams
    Jun 28 '20 at 21:03
3

Try pronouncing module:

https://pronouncing.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

Sample:

pronouncing.phones_for_word("word")

i hope this works :)

3
  • 1
    I don't think pronouncing works for words not in the CMU Dictionary. e.g. a word like "sorceress" doesn't return anything. See this Jupyter Notebook for an interactive example: colab.research.google.com/drive/…
    – Tazik_S
    Dec 18 '20 at 2:03
  • guess i dont have anything to say after i tested it XD Jan 10 at 15:14
  • 1
    it might be a good idea to update your original post to reflect that, lest future readers be misled.
    – Tazik_S
    Jan 26 at 2:56
2

You can use LOGIOS Lexicon Tool. This was the output for your example:

S   EH S
SEE S IY
SEA S IY
COMPUTE K AH M P Y UW T
COMPUT  K AH M P UH T
SEESEA  S IY S IY

I'm not aware of any python implementation, you can try to implement yourself, or call the perl code using subprocess.call

7
  • Thanks but it is possible to get it implemented in Python? Everything I have is in Python and I would like to automate in a script as much as possible.
    – KubiK888
    Nov 12 '15 at 8:09
  • I'm not aware of any python implementation, you can try to implement yourself, or call the perl code using subprocess.call. Edited answer
    – dimid
    Nov 12 '15 at 8:17
  • You can also use jython (haven't tested it) source.cet.uct.ac.za/svn/people/smarquard/sphinx/scripts/…
    – dimid
    Nov 12 '15 at 8:37
  • Sorry but could you elaborate more (maybe a simple code example) on how to use these other languages' codes in Python using subprocess.call? It's way over my head.
    – KubiK888
    Nov 13 '15 at 4:01
  • 1
    @KubiK, do you understand what Jython is? It's a different python engine, and it knows about .jar files. You can't use them with your regular "C Python".
    – alexis
    Nov 16 '15 at 20:22
1

You can use g2p library

INSTALLATION:

pip install g2p_en

OR

python setup.py install

Usage:

from g2p_en import G2p

texts = ["using g2p"]
g2p = G2p()
for text in texts:
    out = g2p(text)
    print(out)
1
  • It's better to format your codes in questions and answer for better readabilty Dec 1 '19 at 8:17
0

I just completed Dunno's answer. By using this the following code, you will get exactly the same result as you can get from LOGIOS Lexicon Tool , which is based on CMUdict.

import re
import pronouncing
text = "april is the cruelest month breeding lilacs out of the dead"
words = text.split()
WordToPhn=[]
for word in words:
    pronunciation_list = pronouncing.phones_for_word(word)[0] # choose the first version of the phoneme
    WordToPhn.append(pronunciation_list)

SentencePhn='  '.join(WordToPhn) 
Output = re.sub(r'\d+', '', SentencePhn) #Remove the digits in phonemes

#SentencePhn: EY1 P R AH0 L  IH1 Z  DH AH0  K R UW1 L AH0 S T  M AH1 N TH  B R IY1 D IH0 NG  L AY1 L AE2 K S  AW1 T  AH1 V  DH AH0  D EH1 D

#Output:EY P R AH L  IH Z  DH AH  K R UW L AH S T  M AH N TH  B R IY D IH NG  L AY L AE K S  AW T  AH V  DH AH  D EH D

I used two spaces between each word's phonemes. If you want to have only one space like LOGIOS Lexicon Tool, you can change it to one space here:

SentencePhn='  '.join(WordToPhn) 

Hope it helps!

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