9

I want to create the effect similar to the old mouse trails where the div is delayed but follows the cursor.

I have come reasonably close by using set interval to trigger an animation to the coordinates of the cursor.

$("body").mousemove(function (e) {
    if (enableHandler) {
        handleMouseMove(e);
        enableHandler = false;
    }
});

timer = window.setInterval(function(){
    enableHandler = true;
}, 250);

function handleMouseMove(e) {

  var x = e.pageX,
      y = e.pageY;

      $("#cube").animate({
        left: x,
        top: y
      }, 200);

}

JSFiddle

There are two problems that remain now:

  1. The 'chasing' div is very jumpy (because of the required use of set interval)

  2. If the mouse move stops before the animation is triggered, the div is left in place, away from the cursor.

1
  • I'm accepting Mikes answer as the result is definitely the closest to the effect I am after but there are other solid ideas here which are probably more lightweight as well. Nov 12 '15 at 19:39
7

I did it slightly differently. Instead of using setInterval (or even setTimeout) - I just made the animation take x amount of milliseconds to complete. The longer the animation, the less responsive the following div will seem to be.

The only problem I notice is that it gets backed up if the mouse is moved a lot.

$(document).ready(function () {

    $("body").mousemove(function (e) {
        handleMouseMove(e);
    });

    function handleMouseMove(event) {

        var x = event.pageX;
        var y = event.pageY;

        $("#cube").animate({
            left: x,
            top: y
        }, 1);
    }
});

https://jsfiddle.net/jvmravoz/1/

5
  • 1
    This is fantastic and pretty much exactly the effect I am after. I think I tried something like this along the way but was concerned about the animation being triggered so often, how much of an issue would this be? Nov 12 '15 at 16:07
  • 1
    Could be a lot, I'm not really sure how much performance impact it'll have considering the animation will be triggered every time the mouse is moved the slightest bit. One solution might be to find a way to only trigger at the start, a few mid-points, and end of a mouse move. That might be easier said than done though Nov 12 '15 at 16:12
  • Yes I figured it might ultimately come down to that, definitely easier said than done unfortunately. Nov 12 '15 at 16:15
  • Here's one method where you only trigger the animation if the mouse has been moved at least 2 pixels. Still not a great solution though - jsfiddle.net/jvmravoz/2 Nov 12 '15 at 16:24
  • 1
    That's nice it takes a bit of weight off for sure Nov 12 '15 at 18:50
4

Remove SetInterval and add a $("#cube").stop(); to stop the old animation based on old (x,y) so you can start a new "faster" one.

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("body").mousemove(function (e) {
        $("#cube").stop();
        handleMouseMove(e);
    });

function handleMouseMove(event) {

  var x = event.pageX,
      y = event.pageY;

      $("#cube").animate({
        left: x,
        top: y
      }, 50);

}
});

Working example https://jsfiddle.net/jabnxgp7/

3
  • This is great, close to what I am after and a nice simple solution. My only issue here is that I imagined the div would slow down as it approached the cursor, as oppose to it jumping over. Additionally, in a completely ideal world the 'chase animation' would be smoother still. Thanks! Nov 12 '15 at 16:05
  • Yeah I dropped in easeOutExpo and it actually helped. Nov 12 '15 at 16:15
  • You're welcome. Glad it helped. :) You can change the animation dalay to put more effort on it Nov 12 '15 at 16:25
2

Super late to the game here but I didn't really like any of the options for adding a delay here since they follow the mouse's previous position instead of moving towards the mouse. So I heavily modified the code from Mike Willis to get this -

$(document).ready(function () {

$("body").mousemove(function (e) {
  mouseMoveHandler(e);
});
var currentMousePos = { x: -1, y: -1 };
function mouseMoveHandler(event) {
  currentMousePos.x = event.pageX;
  currentMousePos.y = event.pageY;
}

mouseMover = setInterval(positionUpdate, 15);

function positionUpdate() {

  var x_cursor = currentMousePos.x;
  var y_cursor = currentMousePos.y;
  var position = $("#cube").offset();
  var x_box = position.left;
  var y_box = position.top;

  $("#cube").animate({
    left: x_box+0.1*(x_cursor-x_box),
    top: y_box+0.1*(y_cursor-y_box) 
  }, 1, "linear"); 
}
});
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
body { overflow:hidden; position:absolute; height:100%; width:100%; background:#efefef; }

#cube {
  height:18px;
  width:18px;
  margin-top:-9px;
  margin-left:-9px;
  background:red;
  position:absolute;
  top:50%;
  left:50%;   
}
.circleBase {
    border-radius: 50%;
}
.roundCursor {
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    background: red;
    border: 0px solid #000;
}

https://jsfiddle.net/rbd1p2s7/3/

It saves the cursor position every time it moves and at a fixed interval, it updates the div position by a fraction of the difference between it and the latest cursor position. I also changed it to a circle since the circle looked nicer.

One concern here is that it triggers very often and could slow down a weak machine, reducing the update frequency makes the cursor jump more than I'd like, but maybe there's some middle ground between update frequency and jumpiness to be found, or using animation methods I'm not familiar with to automate the movement.

2
  • With additional inspiration from guest271314 I reduced update rate by using CSS animation to get a similar effect, but its nowhere near as smooth as just updating every time jsfiddle.net/rbd1p2s7/4
    – c10yas
    Aug 12 '20 at 20:31
  • +1 for smoothness, and producing a true follow with lag. This is somewhat like stabilization in most drawing softwares and was exactly what I was looking for.
    – KarmaPenny
    Oct 24 '21 at 17:17
1

Here is a solution that might mimic the mouse-trail a bit more because it is only remembering the last 100 positions and discarding older ones which kind of sets the length of the mouse trail.

https://jsfiddle.net/acmvhgzm/6/

$(document).ready(function() {

var pos = new Array();
$("body").mousemove(function (e) {
        handleMouseMove(e);
});

timer = window.setInterval(function() {
    if (pos.length > 0) {
        $('#cube').animate(pos.shift(),15);
    }
}, 20);

function handleMouseMove(event) {
  var x = event.pageX,
      y = event.pageY;
  if (pos.length = 100) {
      pos.shift();
  }
  pos.push({'left':x, 'top':y});
}

});
1

Old mouse-trail feature used a list of several windows shaped like cursors which updated their positions with every frame. Basically, it had a list of "cursors" and every frame next "cursor" in list was being moved to current cursor position, achieving effect of having every fake cursor update its own position with a delay of fake cursors - 1 frames.

Smooth, on-demand delayed movement for a single object can be simulated using requestAnimationFrame, performance.now and Event.timeStamp. Idea is to hold mouse events in internal list and use them only after specific time passed after their creation.

function DelayLine(delay, action){
    capacity = Math.round(delay / 1000 * 200);
    this.ring = new Array(capacity);
    this.delay = delay;
    this.action = action;
    this._s = 0;
    this._e = 0;
    this._raf = null;
    this._af = this._animationFrame.bind(this);
    this._capacity = capacity;
}
DelayLine.prototype.put = function(value){
    this.ring[this._e++] = value;
    if (this._e >= this._capacity) this._e = 0;
    if (this._e == this._s) this._get();
    cancelAnimationFrame(this._raf);
    this._raf = requestAnimationFrame(this._af);
}
DelayLine.prototype._get = function(){
    var value = this.ring[this._s++];
    if (this._s == this._capacity) this._s = 0;
    return value;
}
DelayLine.prototype._peek = function(){
    return this.ring[this._s];
}
DelayLine.prototype._animationFrame = function(){
    if (this._length > 0){
        if (performance.now() - this._peek().timeStamp > this.delay)
            this.action(this._get());
        this._raf = requestAnimationFrame(this._af);
    }
}
Object.defineProperty(DelayLine.prototype, "_length", {
    get: function() { 
        var size = this._e - this._s;
        return size >= 0 ? size : size + this._capacity;
    }
});

var delayLine = new DelayLine(100, function(e){
    pointer.style.left = e.x - pointer.offsetWidth/2 + "px";
    pointer.style.top = e.y - pointer.offsetHeight/2 + "px";
});

document.addEventListener("mousemove", function(e){
    delayLine.put(e);
}, false);

https://jsfiddle.net/os8r7c20/2/

0

Try removing setInterval , using .css() , css transition

$(document).ready(function () {
    var cube = $("#cube");
    $("body").mousemove(function (e) {
        handleMouseMove(e);
    });

    function handleMouseMove(event) {
        var x = event.pageX,
            y = event.pageY;
        cube.css({
            left: x + cube.width() / 2 + "px",
            top: y + cube.height() / 2 + "px"
        }).parents("body").mousemove()
    }
});
body {
    overflow:hidden;
    position:absolute;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    background:#efefef;

}
#cube {
    height:50px;
    width:50px;
    margin-top:-25px;
    margin-left:-25px;
    background:red;
    position:absolute;
    top:50%;
    left:50%;
    transition:all 1.5s ease-in-out;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="container">
    <div id="cube"></div>
</div>

3
  • Sorry if I was unclear - the point is for the div to 'chase' the cursor - with a delay, so as the mouse moves, the div will slowly (and smoothly) follow it to gradually catch up once the mouse stops. Nov 12 '15 at 15:49
  • @chris.carruthers See updated post. "chase" could be adjusted at both transition setting and left , top settings at .css() Nov 12 '15 at 15:53
  • I'm not sure if I'm missing something here but tried both those methods and it still seemed to be totally stuck to the cursor. Nov 12 '15 at 16:03

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