54

I have an enum:

enum E {
    case A, B, C(Int)
}

let a: E = .A

Here's how I would check if a equals .B

if case .B = a {
    // works fine
}

But how do I check the opposite condition? (a not equal .B)? Here's what I tried:

if case .B != a { // Variable binding in a condition requires an initializer
    // ...
}

if !(case .B = a) { // Expected ',' separator
    // ...
}

Of course, I could do it this way:

if case .B = a {
    // ...
} else {
    // put your code here
}

but this is awkward, as well as using switch statement. Are there any better options?


EDIT: The solution @Greg suggested works if cases do not have associated values, but if they do == operator needs to be overloaded. Sorry for not clarifying this in the first place.

3
  • if !(case .B = a) { // Expected ',' separator. -- It should be double == not single one.
    – Greg
    Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 16:32
  • 1
    @Greg, nope, same error Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 16:33
  • I ran in similar situation and ended up making function for checking that and returning Bool. That made it easier. Commented Apr 17, 2018 at 15:53

5 Answers 5

39

This "answer" is nothing more than writing your awkward solution in a more compact manner. If you only care about the case when a value is not of a certain enum value, you could write it like this all in one line with the else immediately following the empty then clause:

enum E {
    case A, B(String), C(Int)
}

let a: E = .B("Hello")

if case .A = a {} else {
    print("not an A")
}

if case .B = a {} else {
    print("not a B")
}

if case .C = a {} else {
    print("not a C")
}
2
  • 3
    Somebody who reads this code might not notice the {} else part, but yeah, otherwise it's a viable solution :) Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 17:52
  • 1
    @AndriiChernenko Considering that Swift's guard keyword requires the use of else, I think this could would be grokkable by the average Swift programmer. Commented May 10, 2017 at 6:49
13

There aren't any answers yet mentioning the guard statement, introduced by Swift 2, which is a neat addition to the tools above and, if you ask me, the cleanest solution if you can live with the requirement to return from your function or closure within the else-block:

guard case .B = a else {
    // a does not match .B
    return
}

See Apple's "The Swift Programming Language (Swift 2.2): Statements" for more info.

3
  • 14
    If this is truly an invalid case then guard is acceptible. However if this is just a part of the flow to execute certain functionality guard would be misplaced here I think. What do you think?
    – Starceaker
    Commented Aug 30, 2016 at 19:49
  • 2
    The Swift compiler will yell at you if you try to "fall through" the guard clause: 'guard' body may not fall through, consider using 'return' or 'break' to exit the scope. I think "guarding" sounds less negative than "invalidating", which, if you approach them from a neutral perspective, might allow you to use guard-clauses for a lot more cases than just preventing catastrophy :)
    – epologee
    Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 7:30
  • It's good to know that the compiler prevents misuse of the guard clause (fall through). My project is still in it's baby steps and I have only used guard to actually catch the situations I don't allow. Thanks.
    – Starceaker
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 11:10
8

You are using single = sign which is an assignment operator. You have to use double == which is a comparison one and don't use case .A, use E.A is the right way to do that:

if E.A == a {
    // works fine
    print("1111")
}

if E.B != a {
    // works fine
    print("2222")
}

if E.B == a {
    // works fine
    print("3333")
}

Extended:

To make it works with associated values you have to implement Equatable protocol, example:

extension E: Equatable {}
func ==(lhs: E, rhs: E) -> Bool {
    switch (lhs, rhs) {
        case (let .C(x1), let .C(x2)):
            return x1 == x2
        case (.A, .A):
        return true

     default:
         return false
    }
}

Of course you have to handle all of the possibilities but I think you have an idea.

Extended:

I don't get your comment but this works for me fine:

enum E {
    case A, B, C(Int)
}

extension E: Equatable {}
func ==(lhs: E, rhs: E) -> Bool {
    switch (lhs, rhs) {
        case (let .C(x1), let .C(x2)):
            return x1 == x2
        case (.A, .A):
            return true
        case (.B, .B):
            return true

     default:
         return false
    }
}

let a: E = .A
let b: E = .B
let c: E = .C(11)

if E.A == a {
    // works fine
    print("aaa true")
}
if E.A != a {
    // works fine
    print("aaa false")
}

if E.B == b {
    // works fine
    print("bbb true")
}

if E.B == b {
    // works fine
    print("bbb false")
}

if E.C(11) == c {
    // works fine
    print("ccc true")
}

if E.C(11) != c {
    // works fine
    print("1 ccc false")
}

if E.C(22) != c {
    // works fine
    print("2 ccc false")
}
9
  • 4
    true, it works, but not if cases have associated values. sorry for not claryfing this. Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 16:42
  • 2
    if I overload == it will work for .A and .B, but not for .C, which has associated value. That's why pattern matching is needed. Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 17:02
  • 1
    I mean I cannot just write if .C == a {}, it has to be if .C(0) == a {}, which obviously will not work if a contains .C(1). Pattern matching covers this use case: if case .C = a {} will be true if a contains .C with any associated value. Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 17:12
  • 2
    No disagreement, it does, but if E.C != c will not work. And sometimes I need to check if the value of c is .C, not caring about the associated value. Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 17:18
  • 9
    As I mentioned before, pattern matching allows me to test if variable contains .C with ANY associated value (not some specific one like 0, 1, 22 or whatever). And the compiler is perfectly fine with if case .C = c {}. This is the only case == operator overloading, on which you insist, does not address. That is why such solution is not universal. Commented Nov 12, 2015 at 17:28
-1

I saw the guard answer, and I though I could improve upon it.

Note how the do block is named. I mean, it works

i: do { guard case .B = a else {
    print("foo")
break i }}

Granted, this is much smaller: if case .B = a {} else { *** }


You can use this if you really want that ! operator

func cases<T: Equatable>(_ a: T,_ b: T) -> Bool { return a == b }
if cases(.B, a) {}
if !cases(.B, a) {}
3
  • return a == b is wrong. What if case has associated values?!
    – Farid
    Commented Jan 13, 2023 at 15:44
  • @Farid I forgot to mention you have to add extension E: Equatable {} Thanks for pointing that out.
    – 0-1
    Commented Jan 14, 2023 at 23:18
  • Still wrong. How are you supposed to check if a and b has same associated values?
    – Farid
    Commented Jan 14, 2023 at 23:40
-6

Negating the .case statement is not possible. However you can use a normal comparison, like this:

if a != .B {

}

This is the most direct way to write it, in my opinion.

2
  • 14
    Unfortunately, this works only if .B does not have associated values. Commented Mar 2, 2018 at 17:06
  • 6
    @AndriiChernenko Thank you for letting me know. I will keep the answer, so other developers can learn from my mistake. Commented Sep 7, 2020 at 14:01

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