2

I have a decorator @newthread which wraps functions to run in a separate thread (using wraps from functools and Thread from threading). However, there are some functions for which I only want this to happen some of the time.

At the moment, I have @newthread check the keyword arguments of the function to be wrapped and if it finds a bool new_thread equal to True then it runs the function in a separate thread, otherwise it runs the function normally. For example,

@newthread
def foo(new_thread=False)
     # Do stuff...

foo() # Runs normally
foo(new_thread=True) # Runs in new thread

Is this the canonical way of doing this, or am I missing something?

  • 2
    @Kevin What code is there to be reviewed? The @newthread implementation isn't shown, and the foo stuff is all hypothetical. – 200_success Nov 12 '15 at 18:09
  • Or you could do thread_foo = newthread(foo) and use foo or thread_foo depending on your needs, but I think your way is better. – Sébastien Deprez Nov 12 '15 at 18:09
  • @200_success: Yeah, it would probably help if OP actually provided some code to review. – Kevin Nov 12 '15 at 18:10
  • 2
    @ArtOfWarfare 1. Speaking as a moderator of Code Review, I guarantee you that this question would be immediately closed on Code Review, for the reasons stated above. 2. "Because it belongs on Code Review" is not a valid reason to classify this question as off-topic for Stack Overflow. See the help center for a list of valid off-topic reasons. Also read A guide to Code Review for Stack Overflow users. – 200_success Nov 12 '15 at 18:16
  • 1
    What about conditional decorater ? See Python3 decorating conditionally? – mr.wolle Nov 12 '15 at 18:17
2

Don't use newthread as a decorator, then. A decorator is just a function that takes a function and returns a function.

If you want it to run in the current thread, call

foo(some, params)

If you want to run foo in a new thread, call

newthread(foo)(some, params)
1
@newthread
def foo(new_thread=False)
     # Do stuff...

foo() # Runs normally
foo(new_thread=True) # Runs in new thread

That is good - but, I for one, would prefer to have the decorator do consume the "new_thread" argument, instead of having it showing on the parameter list of the decorated functions.

Also, you could use a "default" value so that you'd pick the actual need to use a different thread from somewhere else (like an enviroment variable):

MARKER = object()
def newthread(func):
    def wrapper(*args, newthread=MARKER, **kwargs):
        if newthread is MARKER:
              newthread = os.environ.get("force_threads", True)
        if newthread:
             ...
             # cretae new thread and return future-like object
        else:
             return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrapper

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