118

Unfortunately, I don't have JQuery or Underscore, just pure javascript (IE9 compatible).

I'm wanting the equivalent of SelectMany() from LINQ functionality.

// SelectMany flattens it to just a list of phone numbers.
IEnumerable<PhoneNumber> phoneNumbers = people.SelectMany(p => p.PhoneNumbers);

Can I do it?

EDIT:

Thanks to answers, I got this working:

var petOwners = 
[
    {
        Name: "Higa, Sidney", Pets: ["Scruffy", "Sam"]
    },
    {
        Name: "Ashkenazi, Ronen", Pets: ["Walker", "Sugar"]
    },
    {
        Name: "Price, Vernette", Pets: ["Scratches", "Diesel"]
    },
];

function property(key){return function(x){return x[key];}}
function flatten(a,b){return a.concat(b);}

var allPets = petOwners.map(property("Pets")).reduce(flatten,[]);

console.log(petOwners[0].Pets[0]);
console.log(allPets.length); // 6

var allPets2 = petOwners.map(function(p){ return p.Pets; }).reduce(function(a, b){ return a.concat(b); },[]); // all in one line

console.log(allPets2.length); // 6
2
  • 5
    That's not unfortunate at all. Pure JavaScript is amazing. Without context, it's very hard to understand what you're trying to achieve here. Nov 12, 2015 at 19:42
  • 3
    @SterlingArcher, see how specific the answer turned out to be. There's weren't too many possible answers and the best answer was short and concise.
    – toddmo
    Aug 18, 2016 at 22:53

11 Answers 11

166

for a simple select you can use the reduce function of Array.
Lets say you have an array of arrays of numbers:

var arr = [[1,2],[3, 4]];
arr.reduce(function(a, b){ return a.concat(b); }, []);
=>  [1,2,3,4]

var arr = [{ name: "name1", phoneNumbers : [5551111, 5552222]},{ name: "name2",phoneNumbers : [5553333] }];
arr.map(function(p){ return p.phoneNumbers; })
   .reduce(function(a, b){ return a.concat(b); }, [])
=>  [5551111, 5552222, 5553333]

Edit:
since es6 flatMap has been added to the Array prototype. SelectMany is synonym to flatMap.
The method first maps each element using a mapping function, then flattens the result into a new array. Its simplified signature in TypeScript is:

function flatMap<A, B>(f: (value: A) => B[]): B[]

In order to achieve the task we just need to flatMap each element to phoneNumbers

arr.flatMap(a => a.phoneNumbers);
5
  • 11
    That last one can also be written as arr.reduce(function(a, b){ return a.concat(b.phoneNumbers); }, [])
    – Timwi
    Jan 29, 2018 at 11:18
  • You shouldn't need to use .map() or .concat(). See my answer below.
    – WesleyAC
    Nov 15, 2019 at 17:13
  • doesn't this alter the original array?
    – Ewan
    Mar 26, 2020 at 10:22
  • Less important now, but flatMap doesn't meet the OP's request for an IE9 compatible solution -- browser compat for flatmap.
    – ruffin
    Aug 31, 2020 at 21:29
  • 2
    reduce() fails on empty array, so you would have to add an initial value. see stackoverflow.com/questions/23359173/…
    – halllo
    Dec 9, 2020 at 11:07
37

As a simpler option Array.prototype.flatMap() or Array.prototype.flat()

const data = [
{id: 1, name: 'Dummy Data1', details: [{id: 1, name: 'Dummy Data1 Details'}, {id: 1, name: 'Dummy Data1 Details2'}]},
{id: 1, name: 'Dummy Data2', details: [{id: 2, name: 'Dummy Data2 Details'}, {id: 1, name: 'Dummy Data2 Details2'}]},
{id: 1, name: 'Dummy Data3', details: [{id: 3, name: 'Dummy Data3 Details'}, {id: 1, name: 'Dummy Data3 Details2'}]},
]

const result = data.flatMap(a => a.details); // or data.map(a => a.details).flat(1);
console.log(result)

4
  • 3
    Simple and concise. By far the best answer.
    – Ste Brown
    Jun 12, 2019 at 16:15
  • flat() is not available in Edge according to MDN as of 12/4/2019.
    – pettys
    Dec 5, 2019 at 0:44
  • But the new Edge(based on Chromium) will support it. Dec 5, 2019 at 13:27
  • 3
    It looks like Array.prototype.flatMap() is also a thing, so your example could be simplified to const result = data.flatMap(a => a.details)
    – Kyle
    Feb 11, 2020 at 15:41
12

For those a while later, understanding javascript but still want a simple Typed SelectMany method in Typescript:

function selectMany<TIn, TOut>(input: TIn[], selectListFn: (t: TIn) => TOut[]): TOut[] {
  return input.reduce((out, inx) => {
    out.push(...selectListFn(inx));
    return out;
  }, new Array<TOut>());
}
9

Sagi is correct in using the concat method to flatten an array. But to get something similar to this example, you would also need a map for the select part https://msdn.microsoft.com/library/bb534336(v=vs.100).aspx

/* arr is something like this from the example PetOwner[] petOwners = 
                    { new PetOwner { Name="Higa, Sidney", 
                          Pets = new List<string>{ "Scruffy", "Sam" } },
                      new PetOwner { Name="Ashkenazi, Ronen", 
                          Pets = new List<string>{ "Walker", "Sugar" } },
                      new PetOwner { Name="Price, Vernette", 
                          Pets = new List<string>{ "Scratches", "Diesel" } } }; */

function property(key){return function(x){return x[key];}}
function flatten(a,b){return a.concat(b);}

arr.map(property("pets")).reduce(flatten,[])
4
  • I';m going to make a fiddle; I can use your data as json. Will try to flatten your answer to one line of code. "How to flatten an answer about flattening object hierarchies" lol
    – toddmo
    Nov 12, 2015 at 19:57
  • Feel free to use your data... I explictly abstracted the map function so that you could easily select any property name without having to write a new function each time. Just replace arr with people and "pets" with "PhoneNumbers" Nov 12, 2015 at 20:02
  • Edited my question with flattened version and voted your answer up. Thanks.
    – toddmo
    Nov 12, 2015 at 20:33
  • 2
    The helper functions do clean things up, but with ES6 you can just do this: petOwners.map(owner => owner.Pets).reduce((a, b) => a.concat(b), []);. Or, even simpler, petOwners.reduce((a, b) => a.concat(b.Pets), []);.
    – ErikE
    Jan 27, 2017 at 21:56
3
// you can save this function in a common js file of your project
function selectMany(f){ 
    return function (acc,b) {
        return acc.concat(f(b))
    }
}

var ex1 = [{items:[1,2]},{items:[4,"asda"]}];
var ex2 = [[1,2,3],[4,5]]
var ex3 = []
var ex4 = [{nodes:["1","v"]}]

Let's start

ex1.reduce(selectMany(x=>x.items),[])

=> [1, 2, 4, "asda"]

ex2.reduce(selectMany(x=>x),[])

=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

ex3.reduce(selectMany(x=> "this will not be called" ),[])

=> []

ex4.reduce(selectMany(x=> x.nodes ),[])

=> ["1", "v"]

NOTE: use valid array (non null) as intitial value in the reduce function

3

try this (with es6):

 Array.prototype.SelectMany = function (keyGetter) {
 return this.map(x=>keyGetter(x)).reduce((a, b) => a.concat(b)); 
 }

example array :

 var juices=[
 {key:"apple",data:[1,2,3]},
 {key:"banana",data:[4,5,6]},
 {key:"orange",data:[7,8,9]}
 ]

using :

juices.SelectMany(x=>x.data)
0
3

I would do this (avoiding .concat()):

function SelectMany(array) {
    var flatten = function(arr, e) {
        if (e && e.length)
            return e.reduce(flatten, arr);
        else 
            arr.push(e);
        return arr;
    };

    return array.reduce(flatten, []);
}

var nestedArray = [1,2,[3,4,[5,6,7],8],9,10];
console.log(SelectMany(nestedArray)) //[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]

If you don't want to use .reduce():

function SelectMany(array, arr = []) {
    for (let item of array) {
        if (item && item.length)
            arr = SelectMany(item, arr);
        else
            arr.push(item);
    }
    return arr;
}

If you want to use .forEach():

function SelectMany(array, arr = []) {
    array.forEach(e => {
        if (e && e.length)
            arr = SelectMany(e, arr);
        else
            arr.push(e);
    });

    return arr;
}
3
  • 2
    I think it's funny that I asked this 4 years ago, and the stack overflow notification for your answer popped up, and what I am doing at this moment is struggling with js arrays. Nice recursion!
    – toddmo
    Nov 16, 2019 at 2:59
  • I'm just glad someone saw it! I was surprised that something like I wrote wasn't already listed, given how long the thread has been going and how many attempted answers there are.
    – WesleyAC
    Nov 16, 2019 at 20:06
  • @toddmo For what it's worth, if you're working on js arrays right now, you might be interested in the solution I added recently here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1960473/….
    – WesleyAC
    Nov 16, 2019 at 20:33
2

Here you go, a rewritten version of joel-harkes' answer in TypeScript as an extension, usable on any array. So you can literally use it like somearray.selectMany(c=>c.someprop). Trans-piled, this is javascript.

declare global {
    interface Array<T> {
        selectMany<TIn, TOut>(selectListFn: (t: TIn) => TOut[]): TOut[];
    }
}

Array.prototype.selectMany = function <TIn, TOut>( selectListFn: (t: TIn) => TOut[]): TOut[] {
    return this.reduce((out, inx) => {
        out.push(...selectListFn(inx));
        return out;
    }, new Array<TOut>());
}


export { };
1

You can try the manipula package that implements all C# LINQ methods and preserves its syntax:

Manipula.from(petOwners).selectMany(x=>x.Pets).toArray()

https://github.com/litichevskiydv/manipula

https://www.npmjs.com/package/manipula

1
  • nice solution!.
    – toddmo
    Jun 18, 2019 at 21:50
1

For later versions of JavaScript you can do this:

  var petOwners = [
    {
      Name: 'Higa, Sidney',
      Pets: ['Scruffy', 'Sam']
    },
    {
      Name: 'Ashkenazi, Ronen',
      Pets: ['Walker', 'Sugar']
    },
    {
      Name: 'Price, Vernette',
      Pets: ['Scratches', 'Diesel']
    }
  ];

  var arrayOfArrays = petOwners.map(po => po.Pets);
  var allPets = [].concat(...arrayOfArrays);

  console.log(allPets); // ["Scruffy","Sam","Walker","Sugar","Scratches","Diesel"]

See example StackBlitz.

0

Exception to reduce and concat methods, you can use the native flatMap api.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/flatMap

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.