100

I have a Spark DataFrame (using PySpark 1.5.1) and would like to add a new column.

I've tried the following without any success:

type(randomed_hours) # => list

# Create in Python and transform to RDD

new_col = pd.DataFrame(randomed_hours, columns=['new_col'])

spark_new_col = sqlContext.createDataFrame(new_col)

my_df_spark.withColumn("hours", spark_new_col["new_col"])

Also got an error using this:

my_df_spark.withColumn("hours",  sc.parallelize(randomed_hours))

So how do I add a new column (based on Python vector) to an existing DataFrame with PySpark?

161

You cannot add an arbitrary column to a DataFrame in Spark. New columns can be created only by using literals (other literal types are described in How to add a constant column in a Spark DataFrame?)

from pyspark.sql.functions import lit

df = sqlContext.createDataFrame(
    [(1, "a", 23.0), (3, "B", -23.0)], ("x1", "x2", "x3"))

df_with_x4 = df.withColumn("x4", lit(0))
df_with_x4.show()

## +---+---+-----+---+
## | x1| x2|   x3| x4|
## +---+---+-----+---+
## |  1|  a| 23.0|  0|
## |  3|  B|-23.0|  0|
## +---+---+-----+---+

transforming an existing column:

from pyspark.sql.functions import exp

df_with_x5 = df_with_x4.withColumn("x5", exp("x3"))
df_with_x5.show()

## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+
## | x1| x2|   x3| x4|                  x5|
## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+
## |  1|  a| 23.0|  0| 9.744803446248903E9|
## |  3|  B|-23.0|  0|1.026187963170189...|
## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+

included using join:

from pyspark.sql.functions import exp

lookup = sqlContext.createDataFrame([(1, "foo"), (2, "bar")], ("k", "v"))
df_with_x6 = (df_with_x5
    .join(lookup, col("x1") == col("k"), "leftouter")
    .drop("k")
    .withColumnRenamed("v", "x6"))

## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+----+
## | x1| x2|   x3| x4|                  x5|  x6|
## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+----+
## |  1|  a| 23.0|  0| 9.744803446248903E9| foo|
## |  3|  B|-23.0|  0|1.026187963170189...|null|
## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+----+

or generated with function / udf:

from pyspark.sql.functions import rand

df_with_x7 = df_with_x6.withColumn("x7", rand())
df_with_x7.show()

## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+----+-------------------+
## | x1| x2|   x3| x4|                  x5|  x6|                 x7|
## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+----+-------------------+
## |  1|  a| 23.0|  0| 9.744803446248903E9| foo|0.41930610446846617|
## |  3|  B|-23.0|  0|1.026187963170189...|null|0.37801881545497873|
## +---+---+-----+---+--------------------+----+-------------------+

Performance-wise, built-in functions (pyspark.sql.functions), which map to Catalyst expression, are usually preferred over Python user defined functions.

If you want to add content of an arbitrary RDD as a column you can

  • "New columns can be created only by using literals" What exactly does literals mean in this context? – timbram Feb 9 '18 at 21:06
  • Spark's Documentation is great, see df.withColumn spark.apache.org/docs/2.1.0/api/python/… – Steven Black Mar 12 '18 at 18:15
  • 3
    Spark documentation is "great" only in that it leaves great swaths of usage up to an exercise for the astute reader. Spark (and Pyspark) covers a veritable zoo of data structures, with little or no instruction on how to convert among them. Case in point: proliferation of questions just like this one. – shadowtalker Jan 7 at 20:06
53

To add a column using a UDF:

df = sqlContext.createDataFrame(
    [(1, "a", 23.0), (3, "B", -23.0)], ("x1", "x2", "x3"))

from pyspark.sql.functions import udf
from pyspark.sql.types import *

def valueToCategory(value):
   if   value == 1: return 'cat1'
   elif value == 2: return 'cat2'
   ...
   else: return 'n/a'

# NOTE: it seems that calls to udf() must be after SparkContext() is called
udfValueToCategory = udf(valueToCategory, StringType())
df_with_cat = df.withColumn("category", udfValueToCategory("x1"))
df_with_cat.show()

## +---+---+-----+---------+
## | x1| x2|   x3| category|
## +---+---+-----+---------+
## |  1|  a| 23.0|     cat1|
## |  3|  B|-23.0|      n/a|
## +---+---+-----+---------+
25

For Spark 2.0

# assumes schema has 'age' column 
df.select('*', (df.age + 10).alias('agePlusTen'))
  • 1
    Needs to be df.select('*', (df.age + 10).alias('agePlusTen')) – Frank B. Jan 13 '17 at 17:37
  • 1
    Thanks, and if you enter df = df.select('*', (df.age + 10).alias('agePlusTen')) you are effectively adding an arbitrary column as @zero323 warned us above was impossible, unless there's something wrong with doing this in Spark, in Pandas it's the standard way.. – cardamom Sep 13 '17 at 11:54
  • Is there is a version of this for pySpark? – Tagar Nov 2 '17 at 23:39
  • @Tagar Above snippet is python. – Luke W Nov 4 '17 at 14:15
  • 1
    @GeoffreyAnderson, df.select('*', df.age + 10, df.age + 20) – Mark Rajcok Jul 28 '18 at 20:30
0

I would like to offer a generalized example for a very similar use case:

Use Case: I have a csv consisting of:

First|Third|Fifth
data|data|data
data|data|data
...billion more lines

I need to perform some transformations and the final csv needs to look like

First|Second|Third|Fourth|Fifth
data|null|data|null|data
data|null|data|null|data
...billion more lines

I need to do this because this is the schema defined by some model and I need for my final data to be interoperable with SQL Bulk Inserts and such things.

so:

1) I read the original csv using spark.read and call it "df".

2) I do something to the data.

3) I add the null columns using this script:

outcols = []
for column in MY_COLUMN_LIST:
    if column in df.columns:
        outcols.append(column)
    else:
        outcols.append(lit(None).cast(StringType()).alias('{0}'.format(column)))

df = df.select(outcols)

In this way, you can structure your schema after loading a csv (would also work for reordering columns if you have to do this for many tables).

0

The simplest way to add a column is to use "withColumn". Since the dataframe is created using sqlContext, you have to specify the schema or by default can be available in the dataset. If the schema is specified, the workload becomes tedious when changing every time.

Below is an example that you can consider:

from pyspark.sql import SQLContext
from pyspark.sql.types import *
sqlContext = SQLContext(sc) # SparkContext will be sc by default 

# Read the dataset of your choice (Already loaded with schema)
Data = sqlContext.read.csv("/path", header = True/False, schema = "infer", sep = "delimiter")

# For instance the data has 30 columns from col1, col2, ... col30. If you want to add a 31st column, you can do so by the following:
Data = Data.withColumn("col31", "Code goes here")

# Check the change 
Data.printSchema()
-1

You can define a new udf when adding a column_name:

u_f = F.udf(lambda :yourstring,StringType())
a.select(u_f().alias('column_name')
-1
from pyspark.sql.functions import udf
from pyspark.sql.types import *
func_name = udf(
    lambda val: val, # do sth to val
    StringType()
)
df.withColumn('new_col', func_name(df.old_col))
  • You need to call StringType(). – gberger Sep 15 '17 at 17:01

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