18

I'm sure this has been asked but I can't quite find the right search terms.

Given a schema like this:

| CarMakeID | CarMake
------------------------
|         1 | SuperCars
|         2 | MehCars

| CarMakeID | CarModelID | CarModel
-----------------------------------------
|         1 |          1 | Zoom
|         2 |          1 | Wow
|         3 |          1 | Awesome
|         4 |          2 | Mediocrity
|         5 |          2 | YoureSettling

I want to produce a dataset like this:

| CarMakeID | CarMake   | CarModels
---------------------------------------------
|         1 | SuperCars | Zoom, Wow, Awesome
|         2 | MehCars   | Mediocrity, YoureSettling

What do I do in place of 'AGG' for strings in SQL Server in the following style query?

SELECT *, 
 (SELECT AGG(CarModel) 
  FROM CarModels model
  WHERE model.CarMakeID = make.CarMakeID
  GROUP BY make.CarMakeID) as CarMakes
FROM CarMakes make

2 Answers 2

10

http://www.simple-talk.com/sql/t-sql-programming/concatenating-row-values-in-transact-sql/

It is an interesting problem in Transact SQL, for which there are a number of solutions and considerable debate. How do you go about producing a summary result in which a distinguishing column from each row in each particular category is listed in a 'aggregate' column? A simple, and intuitive way of displaying data is surprisingly difficult to achieve. Anith Sen gives a summary of different ways, and offers words of caution over the one you choose...

4
  • 2
    The article needs an update - the CLR was for SQL Server 2005. 2008 supports multiple parameters in an aggregate function, so you can recreate MySQL's GROUP_CONCAT's parameters.
    – OMG Ponies
    Jul 30, 2010 at 6:22
  • @OMG Ponies: can you explain more or link please? Not quite sure what you mean...
    – gbn
    Sep 22, 2011 at 10:38
  • 2005 CLR only supports the ability to define one parameter for a CLR aggregate function -- which would only be the column you're wanting to concatenate. MySQL's GROUP_CONCAT supports more parameters (IE: DISTINCT, ORDER BY, etc), which only SQL Server 2008+ supports if someone wants to recreate the MySQL functionality.
    – OMG Ponies
    Sep 22, 2011 at 13:55
  • 13
    While the linked article is absolutely perfect, SO encourages you not to post link-only answers. A brief description of the various methods described in the article, as well as a real solution to the sample data provided in the question would turn my downvote into an upvote.
    – airstrike
    Feb 13, 2014 at 9:09
6

If it is SQL Server 2017 or SQL Server VNext, Azure SQL database you can use String_agg as below:

SELECT  make.CarMakeId, make.CarMake, 
        CarModels = string_agg(model.CarModel, ', ') 
FROM CarModels model
    INNER JOIN CarMakes make 
    ON model.CarMakeId = make.CarMakeId
GROUP BY make.CarMakeId, make.CarMake

Output:

+-----------+-----------+---------------------------+
| CarMakeId |  CarMake  |         CarModels         |
+-----------+-----------+---------------------------+
|         1 | SuperCars | Zoom, Wow, Awesome        |
|         2 | MehCars   | Mediocrity, YoureSettling |
+-----------+-----------+---------------------------+

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