3

Is there a way to check the OS that a PowerShell script is running on, and make an If Statement which says:

[pseudo code]

if its this OS 
    do this 
if its this other OS 
    do this 

Only for a certain line in the script? I have to make a PowerShell script that is setting up private message queues. Sadly, some of the clients of my company don't use Windows Server 2012, so the way more simple version of adding a private message queue wont work on Windows Server 2008 and the outdated PowerShell version. To resolve this problem, I have to also put in the massively complex old way of doing it instead, but I want both methods to be there.

6
  • Sorry i meant "if statement" not loop.
    – Dpw808
    Commented Nov 13, 2015 at 15:42
  • 3
    Sorry but this seems like a rather trivial request. Have you looked up how to get the OS Version. WMI perhaps..... Then you could use a switch statement to action based on results. Example for starting: blogs.technet.com/b/heyscriptingguy/archive/2009/12/08/…
    – Matt
    Commented Nov 13, 2015 at 15:54
  • sorry im still pretty new to powershell, and also new to here so i wasnt sure how to phrase that the way you edited it. oh yes i suppose i could use a switch statement and have the user pick which OS, though i was hoping to automate it.
    – Dpw808
    Commented Nov 13, 2015 at 15:57
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Get operating system without using WMI
    – briantist
    Commented Nov 13, 2015 at 15:57
  • That linked question shows you how to get it 2 different ways.
    – briantist
    Commented Nov 13, 2015 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

10

Switches would be cleaner, but since you asked how to do it that specific way...

Set your variable to check against OS version (lifted from linked thread Get operating system without using WMI):

$OSVersion = (get-itemproperty -Path "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" -Name ProductName).ProductName

Construct your IF statement:

If($OSVersion -eq "Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard")
{
Write-Host "Hooray It's Server 2K8 r2!"
Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\Hooray.jpg"
}
ElseIf($OSVersion -eq "Windows 7 Professional")
{
Write-Host "Okay, Windows 7 is cool, too!"
Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\Smiley.jpg"
}
ElseIf($OSVersion -eq "Windows Vista")
{
Write-Host "What have I done with my life?!"
Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\GunToHead.jpg"
}
ElseIf($OSVersion -eq "Windows Millennium Edition")
{
Write-Host "Go away, operating system.  You are drunk."
Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\LiquorAndHiccups.jpg"
}

Hope that helps. I'm assuming you're new to PowerShell, but when you get comfortable, start learning switches.

1
  • i am new and i do know how to use switches, just not that well i guess lol. ive used it in the past for things like asking the user to put in a number and when they do that number it does a thing
    – Dpw808
    Commented Nov 18, 2015 at 22:24
3

For anyone else who's new to switches here's the Switch statement equivalent of @Nate's answer for comparison. There's also more advanced ways you can choose with them (including regex), and if they get truly complicated you can move the tests to well named functions

$OSVersion = (get-itemproperty -Path "HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" -Name ProductName).ProductName

switch ($OSVersion)
{
    "Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard"
    {
        Write-Host "Hooray It's Server 2K8 r2!"
        Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\Hooray.jpg"
    }
    "Windows 7 Professional"
    {
        Write-Host "Okay, Windows 7 is cool, too!"
        Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\Smiley.jpg"
    }
    "Windows Vista"
    {
        Write-Host "What have I done with my life?!"
        Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\GunToHead.jpg"
    }
    "Windows Millennium Edition"
    {
        Write-Host "Go away, operating system.  You are drunk."
        Invoke-Item "C:\Pictures\LiquorAndHiccups.jpg"
    }
}

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