4

So I was messing with Visual C++ 2015, and I noticed that there's an issue with the way Visual C++ seems to compile constants and the accessing of them.

Consider the following:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <stdio.h>
#include <Windows.h>

#define ITERATIONS 500000
#define GET_START_TIME QueryPerformanceCounter(&StartingTime);
#define GET_END_TIME QueryPerformanceCounter(&EndingTime);
#define CALC_DIFF_TIME ElapsedMicroseconds.QuadPart = EndingTime.QuadPart - StartingTime.QuadPart; ElapsedMicroseconds.QuadPart *= 1000000; ElapsedMicroseconds.QuadPart /= Frequency.QuadPart;

int main()
{
    short results[ITERATIONS];
    const int n = 5;
    int m = 5;
    LARGE_INTEGER StartingTime, EndingTime, ElapsedMicroseconds;
    LARGE_INTEGER Frequency;

    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&Frequency);

    // This loop seems to take about 1400 us on my computer.
    printf("Beginning loop over %i iterations with n constant.\n", ITERATIONS);

    GET_START_TIME;

    for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++)
    {
        int statement = i % 10;

        if (statement == 0)
            results[i] = n * 0;
        else if (statement == 4)
            results[i] = n * 4;
        else if (statement == 2)
            results[i] = n * 2;
        else if (statement == 5)
            results[i] = n * 5;
        else if (statement == 7)
            results[i] = n * 7;
        else if (statement == 6)
            results[i] = n * 6;
        else if (statement == 1)
            results[i] = n * 1;
        else if (statement == 3)
            results[i] = n * 3;
        else if (statement == 9)
            results[i] = n * 9;
        else if (statement == 8)
            results[i] = n * 8;
    }

    GET_END_TIME;
    CALC_DIFF_TIME;

    printf("Finished in %lld us.\n", ElapsedMicroseconds.QuadPart);

    // This one takes about 800 us on my computer.
    printf("Beginning loop over %i iterations with m variable.\n", ITERATIONS);

    GET_START_TIME;

    for (int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++)
    {
        int statement = i % 10;

        if (statement == 0)
            results[i] = m * 0;
        else if (statement == 4)
            results[i] = m * 4;
        else if (statement == 2)
            results[i] = m * 2;
        else if (statement == 5)
            results[i] = m * 5;
        else if (statement == 7)
            results[i] = m * 7;
        else if (statement == 6)
            results[i] = m * 6;
        else if (statement == 1)
            results[i] = m * 1;
        else if (statement == 3)
            results[i] = m * 3;
        else if (statement == 9)
            results[i] = m * 9;
        else if (statement == 8)
            results[i] = m * 8;
    }

    GET_END_TIME;
    CALC_DIFF_TIME;

    printf("Finished in %lld us.\n", ElapsedMicroseconds.QuadPart);

    getchar();

    return 0;
}

The top section runs slower (by about 75% extra time) than the bottom section, and the only difference is that n is a const int instead of a regular int.

My questions: is this by design, or a flaw/bug in Visual C++? Does this have to do with the fact that I am assigning the result to a short?

After further debugging, it seems that if I change the short array to an int array, then the speed for the regular variable increases from ~800us to 1400us with the const value.

So an additional question: why does it take longer for the regular variable arithmetic result to be assigned to an int array, than a short array, and why does the const int take the same amount of time for either?


Additional notes: further troubleshooting revealed that this only happens in Release mode, not in Debug mode.

I've included the .asm file on Gist for anyone interested.

  • Can you show the disassembly? – Mysticial Nov 13 '15 at 17:13
  • @Mysticial I have no idea how to get it, care to enlighten me? – Der Kommissar Nov 13 '15 at 17:14
  • It's buried in one of the preferences. I don't VS in front of me at the moment and I can't name the option name off the top of my head. So you'll have to look around. IIRC, it's probably under "output files". – Mysticial Nov 13 '15 at 17:18
  • 5
    The compiler completely took out all those branches. So you're actually benchmarking an empty loop. What you're seeing is the difference of how empty the loop is. – Mysticial Nov 13 '15 at 17:44
  • 2
    Looking at the machine code is important to see what is happening. Very little of your code remains after the optimizer is done with it, the result[] assignments are all removed since they don't have any observable side-effects and the n and m identifiers never get used. All that remains is the code for i % 10. Which is optimized to a multiplication, much faster on Intel cores. It uses two different strategies for some reason, one is signed and the other is unsigned. You are seeing that the unsigned version is slightly faster. – Hans Passant Nov 13 '15 at 18:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.