54

Is there a method for moving a column from one position in a data.frame to the next - without typing an entirely new data.frame()

For example:

a <- b <- c <- d <- e <- f <- g <- 1:100
df <- data.frame(a,b,c,d,e,f,g)

Now let's say I wanted "g" in front of "a"

I could retype it, as

df <- data.frame(g,a,b,c,d,e,f)

But is there not a quicker way? (Imagine 1500+ columns)

15 Answers 15

52

Here is one way to do it:

> col_idx <- grep("g", names(df))
> df <- df[, c(col_idx, (1:ncol(df))[-col_idx])]
> names(df)
[1] "g" "a" "b" "c" "d" "e" "f"
  • 18
    I think this is the same basic idea: df[,c("g",setdiff(names(df),"g"))] – Frank Aug 31 '13 at 0:17
  • 4
    How could I use this to move "G" to any position I wanted? Perhaps I wanted "G" to be the 2nd column or the 4th? – David Sep 18 '15 at 16:19
  • 1
    @david probably be easier using Ken's solution. Something like subset(df, select=c(a:b,g,c:f)) – Brandon Bertelsen May 2 '16 at 1:30
61

The subset function has a nice select argument that gives a convenient way to select ranges of columns by name:

df <- subset(df, select=c(g,a:f))
  • 2
    Note: this also works with numbers instead of colnames – Bas Mar 9 '16 at 8:21
  • not applicable to hundreds of columns, with real names – Ferroao Feb 25 '17 at 17:45
  • 1
    @Ferroao - it doesn't matter whether it's real names or these fake ones a:g, it works just as well if you do subset(df, select=c(foo, bar:baz)). In particular it doesn't depend on the names being ordered, if that's what you're concerned about. – Ken Williams Feb 26 '17 at 6:20
46

I wrote this function recently called moveme. It's designed to work on vectors, with the intent of shuffling column orders around.

Here's the function:

moveme <- function (invec, movecommand) {
  movecommand <- lapply(strsplit(strsplit(movecommand, ";")[[1]], 
                                 ",|\\s+"), function(x) x[x != ""])
  movelist <- lapply(movecommand, function(x) {
    Where <- x[which(x %in% c("before", "after", "first", 
                              "last")):length(x)]
    ToMove <- setdiff(x, Where)
    list(ToMove, Where)
  })
  myVec <- invec
  for (i in seq_along(movelist)) {
    temp <- setdiff(myVec, movelist[[i]][[1]])
    A <- movelist[[i]][[2]][1]
    if (A %in% c("before", "after")) {
      ba <- movelist[[i]][[2]][2]
      if (A == "before") {
        after <- match(ba, temp) - 1
      }
      else if (A == "after") {
        after <- match(ba, temp)
      }
    }
    else if (A == "first") {
      after <- 0
    }
    else if (A == "last") {
      after <- length(myVec)
    }
    myVec <- append(temp, values = movelist[[i]][[1]], after = after)
  }
  myVec
}

Usage is simple. Try these out:

moveme(names(df), "g first")
moveme(names(df), "g first; a last; e before c")

Of course, using it to reorder the columns in your data.frame is straightforward:

df[moveme(names(df), "g first")]

And for data.tables (moves by reference, no copy) :

setcolorder(dt, moveme(names(dt), "g first"))

The basic options are:

  • first
  • last
  • before
  • after

Compounded moves are separated by a semicolon.

  • 1
    Late to the party answer, for sure.... – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Aug 30 '13 at 19:28
  • @MatthewDowle, thanks for the edit. – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Aug 31 '13 at 3:32
  • 4
    this function is really useful! Why not include it in data.table? – Wet Feet Jan 17 '14 at 8:05
  • @WetFeet, thanks! I enjoyed writing the Function. Not sure if Matthew Dowle sees an actual need for it though :-) – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Jan 17 '14 at 10:53
  • 2
    @Mark, sorry--cannot reproduce, and there's no reason that it should depend on the size of the data.frame -- only on the number of moves required. Perhaps you're mixing up the time it takes to print a large data.frame to the console rather than the amount of time it takes to reorder the columns. For instance, if you have a data.frame named "DF" and did system.time(DF[moveme(names(DF), "V8 before V5; V3 last")]) that should take no time, but system.time(print(DF[moveme(names(DF), "V8 before V5; V3 last")])) would definitely rack up at least a few seconds (7 seconds on my system). – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Feb 16 '18 at 6:27
44

Use select from the dplyr package and its everything() function to move specific columns to the start or end of a data.frame.

Move to the beginning:

library(dplyr)
df %>%
  select(g, everything())

Move to the end:

df %>%
  select(-a, everything())

Or without the %>% pipe operator, those would be select(df, g, everything()) and select(df, -a, everything()) respectively.

8

Here is my solution

df[c(7,1:6)]

or you can also reorder by column name:

df[c("g",names(df)[-7])]
1

This is slightly more elegant and allows to arrange first few leftmost columns and leave the rest unarranged to the right.

ordered_columns_leftside=c('var10','var34','var8')
df=df[c(ordered_columns_leftside, setdiff(names(df),ordered_columns_leftside))]
  • Of all the many alternatives provided to move columns without having to name all columns (and thus useful for moving only the last column in a dataframe with doznes of colums) this is the only one that worked for me. – Krug May 5 '16 at 1:26
1

Here's a similar way I used to move 'n'th column to 2nd position in a huge data frame based on the column name.

Move a column to first position:

## Move a column with name "col_name"  to first column 
colX <- grep("^col_name", colnames(df.original)) 
# get the column position from name 

df.reordered.1 <- df.original[,c(colX,1:(colX-1), (colX+1):length(df.original))]  
# get new reordered data.frame
# if the column is the last one, error "undefined columns selected" will show up. Then do the following command instead of this

df.reordered.1 <- df.original[,c(colX,1:(colX-1)]  
# get new reordered data.frame, if the column is the last one

From anywhere to To 'n'th position

## Move a column with name "col_name"  to column position "n", 
## where n > 1 (in a data.frame "df.original")

colX <- grep("^col_name", colnames(df.original)) 
# get the column position from name 

n <- 2 
# give the new expected column position (change to the position you need) 

df.reordered.2 <- df.original[,c(1:(n-1), colX, n:(colX-1), (colX+1):length(df.original))] 
# get new reordered data.frame

## Optional; to replace the original data frame with sorted data.frame 
## if the sorting looks good
df.original <- df.reordered.2
rm(df.reordered.2) # remove df
  • not working from several possibilities, example, colname= b n=5 – Ferroao Feb 25 '17 at 17:42
1

This is a very old post , but I developed this code which dynamically changes column position within a dataframe. Just change the value of n and Column Name ("g" here) and get dataframe with new column arrangements.

df1 = subset(df, select = c(head(names(df),n=3),"g", names(df) [! names(df) %in% c(head(names(df),n=3),"g")]))
0

If the reordering is a shift, as in your example, you can use the shift function from the taRifx package. It acts on vectors, hence apply it to the column names:

> a <- b <- c <- d <- e <- f <- g <- 1:5
> df <- data.frame(a,b,c,d,e,f,g)
> df[, taRifx::shift(seq_along(df),-1)]
  g a b c d e f
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

In fact the shift function can also be applied to a data frame, but not as expected. You can write a function:

> shift_df <- function(df, n) df[, taRifx::shift(seq_along(df),n)]
> shift_df(df, -1)
  g a b c d e f
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
> shift_df(df, 2)
  c d e f g a b
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5
0

Here is a simple but flexible function I wrote to move a column anywhere in a data frame.

move.col <- function(df, move_this, next_to_this, before = FALSE) {
  if (before==FALSE)
    df[,c(match(setdiff(names(df)[1:which(names(df)==next_to_this)],move_this),names(df)),
          match(move_this,names(df)),
          match(setdiff(names(df)[which(names(df)==next_to_this):ncol(df)],c(next_to_this,move_this)),names(df)))]
  else
    df[,c(match(setdiff(names(df)[1:(which(names(df)==next_to_this))],c(next_to_this,move_this)),names(df)),
          match(move_this,names(df)),
          match(setdiff(names(df)[(which(names(df)==next_to_this)):ncol(df)],move_this),names(df)))]
}

Usage: Specify the data frame (df), the column name you want to move (move_this), and the column name of which you want to move beside (next_to_this). By default, the function will move the move_this column after the next_to_this column. You can specify before = TRUE to move move_this before next_to_this.

Examples:

  1. Move "b" after "g" (i.e., make "b" last column).

move.col(df, "b", "g")

  1. Move "c" after "e".

move.col(df, "c", "e")

  1. Move "g" before "a" (i.e., make "g" first column).

move.col(df, "g", "a", before=TRUE)

  1. Move "d" and "f" before "b" (i.e., move multiple columns).

move.col(df,c("d","f"),"b", before=TRUE)

0

Most solutions seem overly verbose or lack encapsulation. Here's another way to solve the problem

push_left <- function(df, pushColNames){
    df[, c(pushColNames, setdiff(names(df), pushColNames))]
}

push_left(iris, c("Species", "Sepal.Length"))
0

I found a pretty simple way of doing this that suited my needs and doesn't take much time.

You have the following column names: "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g", "h", "i", "j"

Move "d" to second position (after "a"):

attach(df)

df <- cbind(a, d, df[,c(2:3,5:10)])

Move "j" to 4th position (after "c"):

df <- cbind(df[,c(1:3)], j, df[,c(4:9)])
0

I would like to contribute another universal working approach, similar to the previous answers of rcs, Manuel and Scott Kaiser, which only work in specific cases:

move<-function(new.pos,nameofcolumn,dfname) {
  col_idx <- grep(nameofcolumn, names(dfname))
  if (length(col_idx)==0){print("invalid column name");return(dfname)} else {
  if(new.pos>ncol(dfname)){print("invalid column number");return(dfname)} else {
  if (new.pos==1) {
    b<-dfname[ , c( col_idx, c((new.pos):ncol(dfname))[-(abs(new.pos-1-col_idx))] )]  
    }
  else if(col_idx==1 & new.pos==ncol(dfname)){
    b<-dfname[ , c((1:(new.pos-1)+1), col_idx )] 
    }
  else if(col_idx==1){
    b<-dfname[ , c((1:(new.pos-1)+1), col_idx, c((new.pos+1):ncol(dfname)) )] 
    }
  else if(new.pos==ncol(dfname)){
    b<-dfname[ , c((1:(new.pos))[-col_idx], col_idx)] 
    }
  else if(new.pos>col_idx){
    b<-dfname[ , c((1:(new.pos))[-col_idx], col_idx, c((new.pos+1):ncol(dfname)) )] 
    } 
  else{
    b<-dfname[ , c((1:(new.pos-1)), col_idx, c((new.pos):ncol(dfname))[-(abs(new.pos-1-col_idx))] )]
    }
  return(b)
  if(length(ncol(b))!=length(ncol(dfname))){print("error")}
  }
}}

Usage:

a <- b <- c <- d <- e <- f <- g <- 1:5
df <- data.frame(a,b,c,d,e,f,g)
move(1,"g",df)
  • 1
    The <<- is unnecessary. Indentation and more spaces would make your code much more readable. – Gregor Feb 22 '17 at 19:09
-1

Here is one function that might help

  • df: the dataframe
  • ColName: the name of the column(s) to be moved
  • Position: the column number that you want the moved column to appear

moveCol <- function(df,ColName,Position=1) {
    D <- dim(df)[2]
    DFnames <- names(df)
    if (Position>D+1 | Position<1) {
        warning(paste0('Column position ',sprintf('%d',Position), ' is out of range [1-',sprintf('%d',D),']'))
        return()
    }
    for (i in ColName) {
        x <- i==DFnames
        if (all(!x)) {
            warning(paste0('Column \"', i, '\" not found'))
        } else {
            D1 <- seq(D)
            D1[x] = Position - 0.5
            df<- df[order(D1)]
        }
    }
    return(df)
}
  • in several cases, +1 has to be added to "Position" to work as expected – Ferroao Feb 23 '17 at 0:52
-2

@David asked how to move "G" to an arbitrary position, such as 4. Building on @rcs answer,

new.pos <- 4
col_idx <- grep("g", names(df))
df      <- df[ , c((1:new.pos)[-col_idx], col_idx, c((new.pos):ncol(df))[-col_idx])]
  • this doest'n work for me like it should – Manuel May 1 '16 at 11:47
  • Doesn't work... try with df = mtcars moving the "cyl" column to position 4: You get two copies of the hp column and the drat column is dropped. – Gregor Feb 22 '17 at 18:57
  • I think you can make it work if instead of using [-col_idx] you use setdiff(1:new.pos, col_idx) (and similarly for the other end of the sequence). You also need the tail of the sequence to start at new.pos + 1 otherwise the column originally at new.pos is duplicated. – Gregor Feb 22 '17 at 19:00

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