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Given a hashmap in Golang which has a key and a value, what is the simplest way of retrieving the key given the value?

For example Ruby equivalent would be key = hashMap[value]

  • I am no Ruby expert, so I could be missing something. But I don't think it has functionality to look up keys by values. To get a key corresponding to given value, I would do something like this: hashMap.invert[value]. – Akavall Nov 14 '15 at 3:27
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There is no built-in function to do this; you will have to make your own. Below is an example function that will work for map[string]int, which you can adapt for other map types:

func mapkey(m map[string]int, value int) (key string, ok bool) {
  for k, v := range m {
    if v == value { 
      key = k
      ok = true
      return
    }
  }
  return
}

Usage:

key, ok := mapkey(hashMap, value)
if !ok {
  panic("value does not exist in map")
}
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  • @hhh: No problem. Remember to accept answers on your questions. – Tim Cooper Nov 13 '15 at 21:52
  • got it! ... kind new to so – hhh Nov 13 '15 at 21:58
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The important question is: How many times will you have to look up the value?

If you only need to do it once, then you can iterate over the key, value pairs and keep the key (or keys) that match the value.

If you have to do the look up often, then I would suggest you make another map that has key, values reversed (assuming all keys map to unique values), and use that for look up.

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I am in the midst of working on a server based on bitcoin and there is a list of constants and byte codes for the payment scripts. In the C++ version it has both identifiers with the codes and then another function that returns the string version. So it's really not much extra work to just take the original, with opcodes as string keys and the byte as value, and then reverse the order. The only thing that niggles me is duplicate keys on values. But since those are just true and false, overlapping zero and one, all of the first index of the string slice are the numbers and opcodes, and the truth values are the second index.

To iterate the list every time to identify the script command to execute would cost on average 50% of the map elements being tested. It's much simpler to just have a reverse lookup table. Executing the scripts has to be done maybe up to as much as 10,000 times on a full block so it makes no sense to save memory and pay instead in processing.

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