164

What I need is a migration to apply unique constraint to a combination of columns. i.e. for a people table, a combination of first_name, last_Name and Dob should be unique.

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  • 2
    Just an FYI for anyone reading this question: Don't make a constraint based on first name, last name, and date of birth, because more than one person can match on all three of those. (This is mentioned in an answer, but it isn't really an answer.)
    – cesoid
    Nov 25, 2020 at 13:49

6 Answers 6

279

add_index :people, [:firstname, :lastname, :dob], unique: true

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  • 15
    I think that's adding a unique index, not a constraint. Or does the index add the constraint as well? Aug 24, 2011 at 16:24
  • 19
    Nope, it's all good. My bad! The unique constraint comes with the unique index. Aug 24, 2011 at 16:34
  • 8
    I agree with @paul-cantrell : ain't there any way to only add a constraint, not an index (which has db storage influences) Jul 4, 2013 at 15:24
  • 21
    The problem with the model level validation is that it doesn't scale. Two servers could run the same data through at the same time (like a double tap on an api heavy app) I have two identical records in my DB right now and the model has the validation..
    – baash05
    Mar 17, 2015 at 1:26
  • 6
    I like to have both.. Just to make sure
    – baash05
    Mar 17, 2015 at 1:26
28

According to howmanyofme.com, "There are 46,427 people named John Smith" in the United States alone. That's about 127 years of days. As this is well over the average lifespan of a human being, this means that a DOB clash is mathematically certain.

All I'm saying is that that particular combination of unique fields could lead to extreme user/customer frustration in future.

Consider something that's actually unique, like a national identification number, if appropriate.

(I realise I'm very late to the party with this one, but it could help future readers.)

3
  • 3
    hrm... you are certainly right. but probably it was just an example of what Ian wanted to do just to make the question clear.
    – eritiro
    May 12, 2016 at 22:45
  • 2
    Maybe. The answer wasn't intended for Ian though. Or indeed Rangalo. May 13, 2016 at 13:10
  • It was intended for all foo-s, not just Ian or rangalo.
    – ARK
    Dec 17, 2019 at 12:28
26

You may want to add a constraint without an index. This will depend on what database you're using. Below is sample migration code for Postgres. (tracking_number, carrier) is a list of the columns you want to use for the constraint.

class AddUniqeConstraintToShipments < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    execute <<-SQL
      alter table shipments
        add constraint shipment_tracking_number unique (tracking_number, carrier);
    SQL
  end

  def down
    execute <<-SQL
      alter table shipments
        drop constraint if exists shipment_tracking_number;
    SQL
  end
end

There are different constraints you can add. Read the docs

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  • 13
    Docs for PostgreSQL 9.4 say: Adding a unique constraint will automatically create a unique btree index on the column or group of columns used in the constraint. A uniqueness constraint on only some rows can be enforced by creating a partial index. So IMHO there's no need to drop to raw SQL when the outcome will be basically the same as using the add_index method. ;) Mar 23, 2015 at 10:32
  • 8
    Actually there is one reason: It is an implementation detail and discouraged by the docs. Also note that you cannot refer to the constraint by name, since it is not added to the pg_constraint table.
    – kaikuchn
    May 11, 2015 at 10:58
17

For completeness sake, and to avoid confusion here are 3 ways of doing the same thing:
Adding a named unique constraint to a combination of columns in Rails 5.2+

Let's say we have Locations table that belongs to an advertiser and has column reference_code and you only want 1 reference code per advertiser. so you want to add a unique constraint to a combination of columns and name it.

Do:

rails g migration AddUniquenessConstraintToLocations

And make your migration look either something like this one liner:

class AddUniquenessConstraintToLocations < ActiveRecord::Migration[5.2]
  def change
    add_index :locations, [:reference_code, :advertiser_id], unique: true, name: 'uniq_reference_code_per_advertiser'
  end
end

OR this block version.

class AddUniquenessConstraintToLocations < ActiveRecord::Migration[5.2]
  def change
    change_table :locations do |t|
     t.index ['reference_code', 'advertiser_id'], name: 'uniq_reference_code_per_advertiser', unique: true
    end
  end
end

OR this raw SQL version

class AddUniquenessConstraintToLocations < ActiveRecord::Migration[5.2]
  def change
      execute <<-SQL
          ALTER TABLE locations
            ADD CONSTRAINT uniq_reference_code_per_advertiser UNIQUE (reference_code, advertiser_id);
        SQL
  end
end

Any of these will have the same result, check your schema.rb

11

Hi You may add unique index in your migration to the columns for example

add_index(:accounts, [:branch_id, :party_id], :unique => true)

or separate unique indexes for each column

1
  • Sorry, it worked, first I tried by editing and existing migration which didn't work, then added a new one and it worked, thanks.
    – rangalo
    Jul 30, 2010 at 11:10
5

In the typical example of a join table between users and posts:

create_table :users
create_table :posts

create_table :ownerships do |t|
  t.belongs_to :user, foreign_key: true, null: false
  t.belongs_to :post, foreign_key: true, null: false
end

add_index :ownerships, [:user_id, :post_id], unique: true

Trying to create two similar records will throw a database error (Postgres in my case):

ActiveRecord::RecordNotUnique: PG::UniqueViolation: ERROR:  duplicate key value violates unique constraint "index_ownerships_on_user_id_and_post_id"
DETAIL:  Key (user_id, post_id)=(1, 1) already exists.
: INSERT INTO "ownerships" ("user_id", "post_id") VALUES ($1, $2) RETURNING "id"

e.g. doing that:

Ownership.create!(user_id: user_id, post_id: post_id)
Ownership.create!(user_id: user_id, post_id: post_id)

Fully runnable example: https://gist.github.com/Dorian/9d641ca78dad8eb64736173614d97ced

db/schema.rb generated: https://gist.github.com/Dorian/a8449287fa62b88463f48da986c1744a

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