25

I am trying to learn data structures well and implemented the following code for a depth-first traversal/application of a callback on a regular tree:

Tree.prototype.traverse = function (callback) {
  callback(this.value);

  if (!this.children) {
    return;
  }
  for (var i = 0; i < this.children.length; i++) {
    var child = this.children[i];
    child.traverse(callback);
  }
};

How could I change this to make it breadth first instead? This is what the Tree Class looks like:

var Tree = function (value) {
  var newTree = {};

  newTree.value = value;
  newTree.children = [];
  extend(newTree, treeMethods);

  return newTree;
};
58

Fundamentally, the difference between DFS and BFS is that with a DFS you push the children of the current node onto a stack, so they will be popped and processed before everything else, while for BFS you push the children onto the end of a queue, so they will be popped and processed after everything else.

DFS is easy to implement recursively because you can use the call stack as the stack. You can't do that with BFS, because you need a queue. Just to make the similarity clear, lets convert your DFS to an iterative implementation first:

//DFS
Tree.prototype.traverse = function (callback) {
  var stack=[this];
  var n;

  while(stack.length>0) {

    n = stack.pop();
    callback(n.value);

    if (!n.children) {
      continue;
    }

    for (var i = n.children.length-1; i>=0; i--) {
       stack.push(n.children[i]);
    }
  }
};

And now BFS

//BFS
Tree.prototype.traverse = function (callback) {
  var queue=[this];
  var n;

  while(queue.length>0) {

    n = queue.shift();
    callback(n.value);

    if (!n.children) {
      continue;
    }

    for (var i = 0; i< n.children.length; i++) {
       queue.push(n.children[i]);
    }
  }
};
7
  • You can replace the for with stack = stack.concat(n.children) – Andras Szell Nov 23 '17 at 17:44
  • 1
    @AndrasSzell that would change the complexity of the algorithm from O( |V| + |E| ) to O( |V|^2 + |E| ), since concat() allocates a new array. – Matt Timmermans Nov 23 '17 at 18:01
  • Array in JS is basically a hashtable, so there's no difference in complexity between concat and push. – Andras Szell Nov 23 '17 at 18:41
  • 10
    No, an array is not implemented like a hash table. You can use it like a hash, but JS implementations typically optimize arrays for array-like access. HOWEVER... it makes no difference to the above -- allocating a new hash table would also change the complexity similarly, and the difference between concat and push is that concat allocates a whole new one, while push does not. – Matt Timmermans Nov 23 '17 at 18:58
  • 1
    @Totty.js That's so I visit the children in the order I discovered them. In DFS we pop from the end of the stack, so I want to first child at the end. In BFS we pop from the front of the queue so I want the first child at the front. It's not super important, but it's nice – Matt Timmermans Oct 31 '18 at 16:13

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