7

I have a simple form as

<tr>
    <td> <input type="text" name="qty[]" placeholder="qty"/> </td>
    <td> <input type="text" name="price[]" placeholder="price"/> </td>
    <td> <input type="text" name="total[]" placeholder="Total"/> </td>
</tr>

we can have multiple row with the same as above.

What I need is when the User inputs the qty or price the row total needs to update.

What I tried

$('input[name=\'qty[]\']').on('change keyup', function(){
    var qty = $(this).val();
    var price = $(this).parent('tr').find('input[name=\'price[]\']').val();  
});

price is undefined

Or is there an easier way to do it? Please check the Fiddle

UPDATE :

.parent(..) selects the direct parent of each of the elements in the current set of elements. The first argument filters this set. The direct parent of your input element is the td element, not the tr element.

Updated Fiddle

3
  • 2
    .parent(..) selects the parent of each element in the set, filtered by the selector. The direct parent is td, not tr.
    – Sumurai8
    Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 11:02
  • $(this).parent('td').parent('tr') - works !
    – epynic
    Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 11:05
  • Or just .parent().parent(); it's not that you have more than 1 element in that set...
    – Sumurai8
    Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 11:07

5 Answers 5

9

first of, think about making your html as such:

<tr>
    <td> <input type="number" name="qty[]" placeholder="qty"/> </td>
    <td> <input type="number" name="price[]" placeholder="price"/> </td>
    <td> <input type="number" name="total[]" placeholder="Total"/> </td>
</tr>

Also. As far a javascript goes:

jQuery(document).on("change ,  keyup" , "input[name='qty[]'] , input[name='price[]']" ,function(){
     var parent_element = jQuery(this).closest("tr");
     var qty = jQuery(parent_element).find("input[name='qty[]']").val();
     var price = jQuery(parent_element).find("input[name='price[]']").val();
     if( qty.trim() != "" && price.trim() != "")
      {
        jQuery(parent_element).find("input[name='total[]']").val( parseFloat(qty) *parseFloat(price) );
      }
      else
      {
        jQuery(parent_element).find("input[name='total[]']").val("");
      }
});

EDIT :Better approach, properly taking into account empty fields

8
  • you could consider also adding jQuery(document).on("change , keyup" , "input[name='qty[]'] , input[name='price[]'] , input[name='total[]']" ,function(){ to be sure that if someone tries to alter total by hand, it will instead recalculate it. also you can make total disabled on its html markup (just write disabled inside the <input blablabla disabled > tag
    – Elentriel
    Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 11:19
  • 1
    Your jQuery(parent_element)'s can all be replaced with just parent_element. .closest() always returns a jQuery object; you're not gaining anything by using jQuery() here.
    – Matt
    Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 16:38
  • well, its a matter of normalization for me, i prefer to always let jQuery decide of what i give it is an element or a selector (this way functions can receive both selectors and elements as input) so i ALWAYS pass it through jQuery
    – Elentriel
    Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 17:34
  • Fair enough, but surely you only need to do that for inputs you receive from outside the function. In this case, parent_element is always a jQuery object, so calling jQuery() on it does nothing except waste time. (Anyway, I see that you're still writing jQuery(...).find(...).val(...) instead of jQuery(jQuery(...).find(...)).val(...). If you don't trust .closest() to always return a jQuery object, why would you trust .find() to do so?) Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 21:13
  • It is not a matter of closest, that i trust, but as a rule i do not trust a variable to contain an element versus a selector, it does not matter if i just put it there on the line above, 2 years from now and a lot of changes latter i will be glad i did not trust that variable all that time ago. As i said it is just a matter of normalization for me excluding the reason i stated about functions. In term of speed, it is actually about the same, t wont do any more actions to the object compared to calling it directly
    – Elentriel
    Commented Nov 14, 2015 at 21:20
4

Just change parent() to parents():

Demo:

https://jsfiddle.net/yqe4kwbz/9/

Citing from https://api.jquery.com/parents/ sbout parents():

Get the ancestors of each element in the current set of matched elements, optionally filtered by a selector. The .parents() and .parent() methods are similar, except that the latter only travels a single level up the DOM tree.

0
3
$('input[name=\'qty[]\']').on('change keyup', function(){
    var qty = $(this).val();
    var price = $(this).closest("tr").find('input[name=\'price[]\']').val();
});

Although this code works, you have to deal with lots of validations.

3

I"m not sure if you're able to change in the HTML code,but if you can i think it will be better to give your inputs a classs like following example :

<tr>
    <td> <input class='calculate' type="number" name="qty[]" placeholder="qty"/> </td>
    <td> <input class='calculate' type="number" name="price[]" placeholder="price"/> </td>
    <td> <input class='total' type="number" name="total[]" placeholder="Total"/> </td>
</tr>

And use class selectors to get your values :

$('.calculate']').on('change keyup', function(){
    var qty   = parseFloat( $(this).parents('tr').find('.qte').val() );
    var price = parseFloat( $(this).parents('tr').find('.price').val() );  

    $(this).parents('tr').find('.total').val( qty * price );  
});

Hope this helps.

0
2

.parent(..) selects the direct parent of each of the elements in the current set of elements. The first argument filters this set. The direct parent of your input element is the td element, not the tr element.

Since you only have 1 element in your set, don't filter at all. Just get the parent twice, so you select the tr element.

$('input[name=\'qty[]\']').on('change keyup', function(){
    var qty = $(this).val();
    var price = $(this).parent().parent().find('input[name=\'price[]\']').val();  
});

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